1500 & weight capacity

I recently bought an 88 1500 4wd. It seems like it doesn't take much weight to drop the rear end down. How do I tell if the springs are shot?
I was carrying a 1/2 yard of loam and the rear dropped way down. In fact it
didt really come back up until I removed about half.
Did the 1500's come with different rear leaf springs? Should I just put on air shocks?
I am not looking to haul a lot of weight but I dont know if I have had a 1/2 ton on it.
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A set of coil-over shocks would serve u well or some helper springs aka add-a-leafs
--
Mad-Dog
'79 Chevy K-10
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that would make my 3/4 ton squat. use airbags.

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wrote:

a 1/2 yard of wet loam will weigh about 1200lbs... dry sand is almost exactly 1 ton per yard. what exactly do you expect out of your truck? my '88 K2500 will squat until it sits on the 1" thick overload.... doesn't sink at all after that.
-Bret
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Connor wrote:

I had 40, 60-pound bags of cement in the back of my Dakota 4x4. It was riding pretty low, but did it just fine. (2400 pounds in a half ton truck? yep) Is that about what your truck looked like? here is what the truck looks like with that much weight.
http://www.socalrider.net/2004/40_bags.jpg
http://www.socalrider.net/2004/40_bags2.jpg
and here it is empty
http://www.socalrider.net/2004/empty.jpg
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. . ================== snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Trey) wrote:
I had 40, 60-pound bags of cement in the back of my Dakota 4x4. It was riding pretty low, but did it just fine. (2400 pounds in a half ton truck? yep)
<snip>
============================ God ain't made the fool that'll put 2 ton of brick in a one ton truck.
but he shure made one that would try it.
sorry, couldn't help myself.
marsh ~:~ ====================
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Marsh Monster wrote:

oh, I've had well over two tons in my old 1971 F-250. Had broken up concrete filled to the top of the 8' bed, then filled a trailer the same way. funny thing though, the truck hardly felt it! I guess I should just spring for the one ton Diesel.
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......... <INLINE> (untill we run out of lines...then we start spewing forth) ================== snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (Connor) wrote:
I recently bought an 88 1500 4wd. It seems like it doesn't take much weight to drop the rear end down.
......... How do I tell if the springs are shot?
<you need to check the ride height> <with NO payload in the truck>
I was carrying a 1/2 yard of loam and the rear dropped way down. In fact it didt really come back up until I removed about half.
.......... Did the 1500's come with different rear leaf springs?
<No...they did not>
......... Should I just put on air shocks?
<No...not if you're going to be hauling heavy loads...and looks like you are>
........ I am not looking to haul a lot of weight but I dont know if I have had a 1/2 ton on it.
<If the truck is squating down on the rubber absorbers.....then YOU ARE hauling a lot of weight>
==========================Travis, If the trucks ride height looks okay front to back, WITHOUT any payload, and it looks like you have plenty of room between the springs and the rubber stops...then most likely the springs are sufficiently sturdy to handle the load the truck was designed for. You most likely had it way overloaded.
You need to decide the payload you NEED to be hauling in the truck. Then you can decide how sturdy to beef up the suspension.
Keep in mind you WILL be giving up ride quality by stiffening the rear springs up, so you need to decide HOW OFTEN you're going to have it loaded down to the point that you did this time.
Maybe you can find a happy medium without a lot of trial and error.
Air shocks would be fine......if.....the thing isn't sitting down on the rubber stops when you have it loaded with what you need. Too much of that WILL blow even the best shocks.
Helper springs are an option, and would give that happy medium. (Probably yer best option) The truck will still squat when overloaded though.
However..... if you're going to have this thing OVERLOADED a lot.....out of necessity..... then you may want to stiffen up the rear to the point that IT WILL NOT SQAUT. Keep in mind that ride quality thing we discussed.
How?..you ask?
well......
coil springs of course....always my favorite.
Get you some old timer to weld a set of salvage yard, laying around rusting, never will sell, useless for anything, $10 set of coil springs between the axle housing and the frame.
Gar roan tead results.......or yer money back.
bumpy when empty..... sturdy when loaded...
oh yeah.... and don't go hit'n no RR tracks at 90 mph unless you got you some weight in the back.
and.....wear a helmet.
So it's a common sense answer to yer question.
How often are you going to have it loaded like that?
Once a year?.........live with what you have and save your money.
Once every month or two?.....that's often enough to consider the coil springs, because do you really want the hassle of going back to the AutoZonedOut store to warranty those air shocks..much less have to do the labor...every year or so? And....why even bother with the helper springs when they ARE NOT going to make that big a difference with a payload like that?
You could always have a custom set of springs made.....but dammit man....that ain't no brand new truck yer driving....
quit overloading....or use the coilspring idea and get out for under $50, labor and all.
~:~ MarshMonster ~fact...not fiction~ ========================
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a few years ago i had a pallet of sod in my 91 s-10 went all the way to the bumper stops. then it still had the 2.8 in it, you could barely feel the load in the back. what they have listed is just a recomendation, like the trailers from uhaul that say speed limit 45 when you look in the side view mirror. i have seen people going down I-95 going 85-90.
--
urb's91
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