1985 Chev 305 No Spark

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What type of emissions testing is mandated where you live?
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On Thu, 17 Aug 2006 04:35:00 GMT, aarcuda69062

Use to check CO,NC and NOx emissions here bi-anually until last year when they stopped doing it. That burb easily passed it every time and well below limits.. Matter of fact, none of my cars ever failed. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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I meant HC not NC ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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Okay, pretty much the same gasses as are checked elsewhere.
Doesn't answer my question though.
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On Thu, 17 Aug 2006 16:12:33 GMT, aarcuda69062

It was simulated driving cycle on a dyno if that is what you are looking for. It was about a 10 minute cycle but if vehicle was far below max limits, the software would terminate test and pass vehicle early. It would only go full cycel if it was close to limits and they needed a bigger data spread to work with. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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In article

Did you disconnect the vacuum advance before you checked he timing, was the idle speed all the way down to curb idle? Did you take the cap and rotor off and check that the mechanical advance isn't seized?

Ah-hem...
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aarcuda69062 wrote:

Ja, Ja, did the vacuum advance....its an older van...stationed here in -40C Winnipeg, Canada....the battery been frozen over at least 4 times. First time I started it in nearly 2 years. Still has that old gas from two years ago....but I might need to adjust the Carb because there was an issue about it before the tear down.
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An 85 G chassis van is not TBI.
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Ok... you got 12vdc...good.
When you installed the new coil, did you make sure the grounding strap was connected between the frame of the coil and the middle leg of the connector on the side of the cap? If not, it'll smoke your new module in a hurry.
I asked in another response, but I'll ask again...does the module have 4 or 5 pins? If it's a 5-pin module, there's a GM service bulletin that pertains to bypassing the basic ECM that connects to it.
~jp
General wrote:

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Jon R. Pickens wrote:

When asking about the module....I assume the black horseshoe item located beneath the rotor. If so...it is a five prong Module, three on one side 2 on the other. So...does this mean I should still be able to get spark?
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In article

Go to where the missing box is under the drivers seat, jumper the green wire to the black wire, this bypasses the ESC function. (you'll no longer need the module under the seat, so don't run out and waste any money on one)
A blue scotch-loc will work fine for his.
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On Tue, 15 Aug 2006 18:24:57 GMT, aarcuda69062

Better be ready to run timing at ATDC some because it will knock on 87 octane in warm weather big time if it is a ESC system and when you retard spark you retard MPG too. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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On Tue, 15 Aug 2006 23:43:04 GMT, aarcuda69062

I know it is different as it was first generation (they are on third gen now) but even the modern replacement parts for it are more relaible than those parts made nearly 25 years ago. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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Well there you go then!

Silly me. Spent the whole day working on a Nissan Maxima, I guess I forgot my GM basics.
Wait...
... no I didn't.

No, the newer -designs- are more reliable, not to mention that your 89 has no mechanical fuel pump to contribute noise into the knock sensor circuit and uses a serpentine belt instead of the (vintage 85) vee belts which would get hot and stretch in the G vans and contribute enough racket into the knock sensor to cause power loss and poor fuel economy. The term "couldn't pull cotton out of a Kotex" was frequently used back in the mid 80s WRT 305 trucks and the way the ESC [didn't] work.
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On Wed, 16 Aug 2006 03:00:20 GMT, aarcuda69062

You know I have been driving since late 60's and have been around and dirven most of the vehicle discussed here or ones like them. I saw some reliable ESC systems. Also the knock sensor has a quarts crystal in it and it listens for a certain frequency that a knock produces and it is a lot different than fuel pump noise in this regard. Van generally were more prone to knock because they had higher underhood temps which increase tendancy to knock on lower octane fuel and would make them appear more troublesome at times. BTW, the reason they went to a electronic pump is because TBI fuel injection needed a stead fuel presure supply not because the pump was interfering with knock sensor. I know all about those pumps because my dad rep'ed for a company that did prototype work on the pump motor for GM in mid 80's and provided them for a while too. I could tell you all about those motors. I used to have one of the prototypes years ago but it is long gone now. It was a bit of a challange at first to make them work and last but they worked it out before production. My 89 still has original pump too. (one of my "dad's" motors so to speak) ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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Driving does not make you a mechanic.

"Been around" and "dirven" hardly beats factory training.

Not in the late 60's.

'Quartz' "Quarts" is how they sell booze.

Wow, you know more than the engineers at GM. Did I perhaps meet you at some time at the GM/ Delco engineering facility on Port Washington Rd. in Milwaukee?

The TSB applied equally to vans and pick up trucks.

Pathetic that you would imply that I said anything remotely close to that.

And this proves what? (other than you like to go off on irrelevant tangents)
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aarcuda69062 wrote:

Nor does being an engineer,

U can TRAIN a Dog or animal to do anything BUT they Still know NOTHING !

Doesnot mean u Know anything, We remember that GM engineer's Created all those parts that NEEDED to be RECALLED !! And a TRUE MECHANIC had to change them!

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Indeed. Seems I recall Snoball making a claim to that effect...

Agreed. A classic example would be comparing a mechanical/vacuum advance distributor with ESC in a 1985 van to a computer controlled EST/ESC system in a 1989 Suburban (or S-10) and expecting the second to behave the same as the first.

What recall would that be?
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Without the ESC/ECM module connected, you probably will not be able to get spark.
The purpose of the ESC (electronic spark control) is to delay (retard) spark timing based on input from a knock sensor. The 5-pin module you have basically has an "in" and an "out", which are pins 1 & 3 on the 3-pin side of the ignition module.
Aarcuda69062 gave you the quick fix on how to bypass the ESC. If the ESC is missing altogether, then this is also the solution to get up and running with that 5-pin ignition module. Basically, if you traced them back to the distibutor, the two wires he describes connect to those two outer pins on the ignition module. You're just bypassing the computer and letting it form a loop.
As I stated earlier, that early form of electronic spark control was problematic enough to where GM issued a service bulletin detailing the very simple process of bypassing the system. Once the two wires are jumpered together, the ESC can be disconnected altoghether.
~jp
General wrote:

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NO SPARK
TIMING CHAIN GEARS Broken ( does the ignition rotor Turn when rolling over the Engine?)
Distributor Gear pin SHEARED
Distributor MODULE ( NEVER CHECK for Spark by grounding an ignition wire. Also Attach a good spark plug to that wire or U will Blow The IGNITION module )
ignition fuse blown in the fuse box ( No 12 volts on the RED wire that hooks to the ignition cap )
Jon R. Pickens wrote:

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