1998 Tahoe 6.5TD Heater Hose Quick-Connect Leak

Just finished replacing/repairing the leaking quick-connect (from thermostat bell housing to heater hose/tube). As expected, the bast*rd snapped off quite easily leaving about 1/2" sticking out of the bell housing. Tried a vise grip on what remained and snapped that off, too, leaving about 1/8" sticking out.
A shortened (as in snapped) hacksaw blade would not fit so I used a 1/2" drill bit on a right-angle drill to slowly/carefully remove material from the remaining broken quick connect. Used a small vise-grip to hold the fine-tooth hacksaw blade which I used to cut the broken piece into four sections (cut on the pull stroke). Used a medium-tooth jigsaw blade to finish the cuts (cut on pull stroke). Used a propane torch to heat the exterior of the bell housing. Used a screwdriver and a hammer to dislodge the segments from the bell housing. I had gone too far on one cut and scored the threads but not to worry. Used a battery terminal brush to clean the threads. Used pipe joint compound w/Teflon (better than Teflon tape) on the 5/8" I.D. barb-to-1/2" MIP brass adapter (Home Depot plumbing section, SKU #48643-07450 / WATTS #A-493, $2.45). Used a 2" length of 5/8" heater hose and hose clamps to connect the metal tube the barb.
Two and half hours of work and four cans of beer and the leak is now gone. No sense in replacing the quick connect ($8-10) which would leak again later. Also cheaper than replacing the thermostat manifold. Good luck to anyone else patient enough to attempt same.
Regards, Franko
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Greetings,
I feel your pain, brother. Been there - done that on my former '95 Chevy but fortunately for me didn't have all the issues you did removing the pieces. One other thing that I did run into - I had to double-clamp the hose when I got all the pieces into place, but thankfully it wasn't that much of a problem. No leaks at all after that.
I don't know who approved those quick disconnects they used, but I don't like it.
Cheers - Jonathan
Just finished replacing/repairing the leaking quick-connect (from thermostat bell housing to heater hose/tube). As expected, the bast*rd snapped off quite easily leaving about 1/2" sticking out of the bell housing. Tried a vise grip on what remained and snapped that off, too, leaving about 1/8" sticking out.
A shortened (as in snapped) hacksaw blade would not fit so I used a 1/2" drill bit on a right-angle drill to slowly/carefully remove material from the remaining broken quick connect. Used a small vise-grip to hold the fine-tooth hacksaw blade which I used to cut the broken piece into four sections (cut on the pull stroke). Used a medium-tooth jigsaw blade to finish the cuts (cut on pull stroke). Used a propane torch to heat the exterior of the bell housing. Used a screwdriver and a hammer to dislodge the segments from the bell housing. I had gone too far on one cut and scored the threads but not to worry. Used a battery terminal brush to clean the threads. Used pipe joint compound w/Teflon (better than Teflon tape) on the 5/8" I.D. barb-to-1/2" MIP brass adapter (Home Depot plumbing section, SKU #48643-07450 / WATTS #A-493, $2.45). Used a 2" length of 5/8" heater hose and hose clamps to connect the metal tube the barb.
Two and half hours of work and four cans of beer and the leak is now gone. No sense in replacing the quick connect ($8-10) which would leak again later. Also cheaper than replacing the thermostat manifold. Good luck to anyone else patient enough to attempt same.
Regards, Franko
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Franko wrote:

bell housing to heater hose/tube). As expected, the bast*rd snapped off quite easily leaving about 1/2" sticking out of the bell housing. Tried a vise grip on what remained and snapped that off, too, leaving about 1/8" sticking out.

Just wondering if - or why not if you didn't - you tried an E-Z out on it.
JLarsson
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I'm not sure what that red/orange adhesive/compound is but there was no way an E-Z out was going to break the adhesion. Besides, the material is a soft alloy that would end up expanding more into the bell housing as the E-Z out is tightened...Franko

the bast*rd snapped off quite easily leaving about 1/2" sticking out of the bell housing. Tried a vise grip on what remained and snapped that off, too, leaving about 1/8" sticking out.

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Mine actually came out without breaking, but something I read somewhere suggested the e-z out in case it did break. Sounds like a good thing I didn't have to use it.
JLarsson
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JLarsson wrote:

    Internal Pipe removers. They are a type of e-z outs. Using square e-z outs in pipe fittings will have bad results. Charles
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Charles Bendig wrote:

Nice to know, Charles. Thanks.
JLarsson
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Now it's my turn to replace the quick-connect that has corroded on my vehicle. I know it has been a while since some of you tackled this not-so-enjoyable issue on your vehicles... But should the heater hose come out of the quick-connect piece before trying to screw out the connector that is threaded into the block? Or did you leave it connected until it screwed out? The quick-connect on my vehicle is rusting/corroding in two places: where it is threaded into the block and also where the hose goes into the quick-connect piece. Should I use a torch to try and loosen the threads? Will WD40 or liquid wrench help to loosen it up?
Any other steps or suggestions on this repair would be greatly appreciated! Thank you in advance!
Charles Bendig wrote:

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ttalc wrote:

I would DEFINITELY remove the hose from the fitting. You can get the proper-size deep-wall socket on it that way and have the greatest chance of removing it in one piece.
I wouldn't be comfortable trying to focus as much heat as I think you'll need down on that joint. Plus, the heat will be absorbed a lot by the....what, block? Manifold? I don't even know what that screws into right now. lol
The compound used to seal the threads on mine looked like it would repel any application of oil, but it could maybe possibly potentially help a little. Sort of. Maybe. Or not.
If you can get the right-size socket on there and make sure you keep your force perpendicular to the axis of the bore of the adapter, you just might get it out of there. I assume it's leaking where the seal is, not from a crack in the adapter somewhere.
Good luck. Let us know how it turns out. Get it? How it "TURNS OUT"! I gotta' get more sleep. lol
JLarsson
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ttalc wrote:

    Follow JLarsson advice. To that I will add: Do not heat this area via flame. If your manifold is iron you could do 4 small tack/spot welds near it very carefully. That would produce enough heat right before attempting to remove the fitting. Especially if the fitting has a ice cube in it. Epand the manifold, contract the fitting.
    If you have galvanic corriosion around the top of the fitting, PB Blaster works well. Spray it down atleast 8 hours before you go to remove it, then again a hour before.
    If you get lucky it will come out intact. Charles
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Charles Bendig wrote: "Now it's my turn to replace the quick-connect that has corroded on my vehicle. I know it has been a while since some of you tackled this not-so-enjoyable issue on your vehicles... But should the heater hose come out of the quick-connect piece before trying to screw out the connector that is threaded into the block? Or did you leave it connected until it screwed out? The quick-connect on my vehicle is rusting/corroding in two places: where it is threaded into the block and also where the hose goes into the quick-connect piece. Should I use a torch to try and loosen the threads? Will WD40 or liquid wrench help to loosen it up? Any other steps or suggestions on this repair would be greatly appreciated! Thank you in advance!"
I recently changed my connection on a 2000 Chevy C2500 with the 5.7 litter. I had trouble while on the road no where near my home. I made it to a NAPA store and bought the necessary replacement fitting. I also purchased the tools to remove the hose but as my luck has it the fitting broke off in the engine block. I then purchased an easy out to fit and it still would not come out. I finally decided to use a long extension and try to wedge it in the fitting. This worked and I was able to unscrew it from the block. Had I been at home and had the time to let it soak in Kroil or JB Blast I would have but broke down 300 miles from home you try what you can.
Sarge
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Sarge wrote:

    When you drive a square peg in a round hole, something has to give. I advise not doing so as it's normially the threads on the intake, or worse the intake that gives. The tool to use is a internal pipe ez-out/remover. It's circular and has teath to grab in to the fitting with out destorting it enough to crack the manifold.
    Another thing that can be done is to chiesel the fitting out of the threds carefully. Use long reach neadle nose pliers, a shop vac, what have you to remove the debris. I almost thing these fittings should be replaced at 100,000 mile mark. Especially on Astrovans. I see more broke on those then I do S--10's and fullm size trucks. Charles
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Forgot to mention that when I removed the broken fitting, I replaced it with a pipe nipple and hose-barb adapter. I cut the quick-connect part out of the hose, hose over the adapter, two hose clamps, and I'm a happy guy. The flex-loom around the original hose helps hold it up so it doesn't crimp at the adapter, as do the two hose clips located lower, one on the engine and one on the body, I think.
JLarsson
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JLarsson wrote:

    Use a BBC water pump to water neck hose in applications with a 45 to 90 degree bend. Other then that the barb fitting is the same as the front carberated SBC fitting on any 68 to 88 engine. The threads are 1/2 NPT. Charles
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Charles Bendig fired up his mental motor, engaged the gears, let out the clutch, and wrote:

Thanks for that info, Charles. The original hose has a couple bends molded into it also, but if and when I have to replace that hose, I'll remember that (hopefully <g>).
JLarsson
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