2002 GMC SONOMA 4x4 REAR DIFF.

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Hey Yall, So I have a rear diff. seal leak on my 2002 4x4 Sonoma and I plan on taking it apart to drain the oil and replace the seal. I haven't replaced one before so I'm lookin for a little guidence. Anyone who
knows trucks help me out.
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On Thu, 20 Sep 2007 18:33:32 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Are you talking about cover seal?? If so try snugging the bolts up a bit. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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Yeah the cover seal, I assume it's pretty easy...drain it unbolt it scrape the old seal off and spread on a new one then refill the oil once that's set. I just don't wanna get started and run into something I wasn't expectin.
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On Fri, 21 Sep 2007 11:53:33 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote

Everything is pretty straightforward. I would add that both surfaces should be cleaned with acetone until no oil remains, not even oil from your hand. I recommend Permatex Black -without- a gasket (some gaskets will block the oil passages to the axles -- those two big holes beside the bearing caps, you'll see them when you pull off the cover). Follow the Permatex directions -exactly-, let it fully cure, and -then- put the oil back in. Do it this way and you won't have to re-do it later.
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On Fri, 21 Sep 2007 05:39:09 -0700, Frank Gilliland

If you want to go gasket replacement with RTV only, you really want on surface to be a bit oily (diff) and the dry surface (cover) has the RTV applied to it. Let RTV skin over a bit them install cover finger tight and let sit overnight and then snug it up next day and fill with oil. If you clean both side and use RTV, you will have a hard time removing cover in future because it will kinda be glued on. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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yeah? If you do it your way(leaving oil on the surface)it'll surely leak. To remove a cover sealed with RTV only, remove all the bolts, and tap the cover sideways. The RTV has a low sheer strength(that's resistance to sideways movement)and will release easily by tapping sideways. -- Old Crow "Yol Bolson!" '82 FLTC-P "Miss Pearl" '95 YJ Rio Grande BS#133, SENS, TOMKAT, MAMBM
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


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wrote:

Never had one leak my way. Works every time. Part of the trick is to tighten it only finger tight at first then snug after cure. (a big mistake some make is snugging it down before it cures fully when it is replacing gasket) Also shear strength is not that low and if you glue both sides it will be hard to remove and on surface is not lightly wetted with oil. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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The reason I clean both surfaces is because I was taught to do it that way by a GM tech, who also taught me that oily surfaces are the #1 reason why gasket sealers fail. If your's didn't then you didn't keep it very long, or didn't drive it hot much..... or maybe you were just plain lucky. I don't know. But I -do- know that I've never had a leak, and never had a problem getting the cover off after doing it the way I was taught.
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On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 01:49:37 -0700, Frank Gilliland

I the old days when you used old style permatex which was a sealant based on petrolem (it was used as a solvent or vehicle in them) this was true but today with RTV which is not soluble in pretol based products you want a light film or residue on on surface to prevent the RRV from clinging to it tightly. It will seal if you do it like I said. People make the mistake of tightening it before it cures and squezing sealant out when being used as a gasket replacement. When you let it cures finger tight it forms a new gasket the you snug up after it cures and the result is a good seal. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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Say what?
I don't know where you get your information about Permatex changing from a petro to a non-petro solvent but it's wrong. The stuff has been around a long time (probably longer than me) and has always had a base solvent that was an aromatic hydrocarbon, usually toluene.

NEVER torque or "snug up" an RTV sealant after it cures. That's a sure way to CREATE a leak where none existed before.
If you follow the directions on the package, as I stated before, you won't have any problems. The directions for Permatex Black says -not- to torque (snug) the bolts after the sealant cures. If you need a sealer in an application where you -need- to torque the bolts, like on transfer cases and such, the best stuff is Loctite 514 and torque the bolts -before- the sealant cures. But you still need clean, oil-free surfaces.
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On Mon, 24 Sep 2007 13:39:47 -0700, Frank Gilliland

I do not use that stuff anymore nor di i recommand it. Black RTV also sold under Pematex brand is the way to go today. Old stuff is history

You need to draw it just a bit with finger on bolts to distibute sealant evenly but not tight enough to squeeze it out.

There is a good bit of difference between snugging them down on bit with fingers and torquing them with a wrench ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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<snip argumentative back-pedalling>
Just follow the directions. The directions on the tube say that the "surfaces (plural) must be clean and dry". You don't work on my truck, so if -you- want to use it on an oily surface then by all means do so. Myself, I would rather do it the right way.
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wrote:

Though I am not as old (age wise) as some in here, I can say that I can never recall one time, using any form of RTV or sealant regardless of intended use or design that does not instruct the user to ensure that BOTH surfaces be clean, oil/grease free and dry. I don't understand why anyone (except maybe one that will remain nameless) would go through the process of repairing something only to finish the last part of it half assed and take the risk of a premature failure due to a piss poor seal.
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Some people (who will remain nameless) are nothing more than magazine mechanics who will say anything, right or wrong, that gives them a feeling of self-importantance. It's also possible that he's working for GM sales division, trying to trick us into destroying our old clunkers so we have to buy brand new clunkers.
Either way, anyone who recommends leaving a film of oil on a surface that is to be sealed against oil leaks has absolutely no credibility with me.
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wrote:

How about some one that tells a poster to trade in a perfectly good truck (all be it a dodge) because of a 30 dollar sensor being bad? The same nameless person did just that. This same nameless person has no credibility in numerous groups, so you are not alone Frank.
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On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 01:49:37 -0700, Frank Gilliland

As a GM tech for 18 years I thank you. SM just doesn't know what he's talking about. -- Old Crow "Yol Bolson!" '82 FLTC-P "Miss Pearl" '95 YJ Rio Grande BS#133, SENS, TOMKAT, MAMBM
--
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wrote:

I will tell you what, I have seen some GM techs that are clueless too and had a few of them work on my truck under warranty too. Most GM techs do not give much thought to maybe having to repair same thing again as they just want to do it as quickly as possible and get paid. You can do it to "dumb" or "tech" glue it on method or take time to do it correctly and be able to get it apart without a hammer and a screwdriver or a prybar and possible damage seal surface in process. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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SnoMan wrote:

I've never come into contact with one that wasn't only a parts changer.
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You know lots of good ways to repair cars that doesn't require changing parts? Like for example, how would you deal with a burned out tail lamp without changing a part? What about a leaking water pump? How about the infamous V-6 and V-8 intake gaskets that leak? Or the Buick 3800 upper plenum EGR burn thru?
You talk pretty stupid.
Oh, wait, you think an early 90s GM pick-up truck AC system has a sight glass...
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I have to ask, if a problem can be resolved with out changing out parts, can you suggest a way to fix the bad lower ball joints on my 200k miliage Z-71?
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