4x4 Blazer

I noticed the other day when my brother hi-centered my truck that only the front driver and rear passenger wheels were turning. What would it take to
get power to all four wheels?
Thanks, Clay
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lockers on both axles.
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About $1000 for Lockers. Almost as much for Limited-Slips! About $500-$800 for mini lockers and you would save big $$$ on a pro installer!

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Many thanks. Clay
"Shades" <shades_1970(at)netins(dot)net> wrote in message

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Just don't expect to drive it on the street if you put lockers in both ends. Even off road a locker in the front will make steering interesting. Now if you went with an air locker in both ends you would have the best set-up, not cheap but the best way for a vehicle that will be used on the street.
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Steve Williams
Near Cooperstown, New York
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A locker in the front end without power going to it will not effect how it steers.
Air lockers in both ends would be about $1400-$1800 not including instillation or air compressor or control.

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A locker is LOCKED all the time regardless if it has power going to it or not. IF he has locking hubs the front locker won't affect the steering IF he keeps them unlocked. Lock those hubs and you will fight to steer the vehicle on any surface that has the slightest grip. A rear locker will affect steering though. On slick surfaces it will want to push the truck in a straight line and the way they lock in/out on turns takes some adjustments to your driving unless you like ditches. Those reasons are why trucks like the land rovers have air lockers and locking transfer cases. They are a real handful to drive when they are locked in.
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Steve Williams



"Shades" <shades_1970(at)netins(dot)net> wrote in message
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You are talking about a spool, not a locker! Think before you yell!
A locker will not lock if there is not power going to it or high resistance...Basically if the driveshaft isn't trying to make the tires go faster or slower, a locker will not lock! A spool is a solid piece that eliminates any difference in wheel speed all the time. A locker WILL disengage for easy turning if the vehicle is coasting and will lock under even light power or med-hard decelerating.

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You might want to look at a locker first. A locker is locked UNTIL you try to turn, then they unlock until the differential action is no longer needed, then they lock back up.
Quote from Lock Rights site - "The Lock-Right's operation is fully automatic. While traveling straight the Lock-Right will lock the axles together similar to a spool, but when the wheels need to differentiate in a turn, the Lock-Right will allow the outside wheel to rotate faster to complete the turn. The internal gears in the Lock-Right will overrun each other to allow this differentiation."
From Detroit Lockers site - Tractech makes several locking differentials, the most popular being the Detroit Locker brand. They keep the wheels locked together (except when turning) so that together the left and right wheels always deliver maximum traction to the ground; neither wheel can spin out. They allow different wheel speeds in a turn by disconnecting the faster - moving wheel (usually the outside wheel which is ground - driven faster throughout the turn) and driving the vehicle with the other (inside) wheel.
Detroit Locker The Detroit Locker maximizes traction by delivering 100 percent of the torque to both drive wheels. It is engineered to keep both wheels in a constant drive mode, and has the ability to automatically allow wheel speed differentiation when required. Enthusiasts and professionals use the Detroit Locker in many off-road applications. It is the only differential used in NASCAR
Happen to have three Lock rights and two Detroits in the shop.
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Steve Williams
Near Cooperstown, New York
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Thanks for the info guys. I will put it on the "to do list".
Thanks again, Clay

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