4x4 suspension tutorial?

Hi,
I'm wondering if anyone knows any good sites or resources that gives a good thorough explanation and diagrams of how a 4x4 suspension is put together and works. So far a web search just finds all kinds of places
wanting to sell crap or hot rod suspension systems for 2WD. I'm looking for 4WD trucks mainly. Any help would be appreciated
Thanks Brandonb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That is kind of a big question, do you have a specific question, or a problem you are working on? To get you started there are several different designs, the main designs are:
leaf spring - springs hold both the axle in place, and provide the suspension. coil spring - spring coils hold the weight of the vehicle and provide suspension, other bars are uses as links to hold the axle position independent suspension - Each wheel will have it's own suspension system. Search for IFS and you will find lots of info.
I should add that these are not 4x4 specific suspensions, but could be used for 2x4 models as well.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm not working on a problem, just looking for knowledge in general. I guess I should state more specifically front suspensions on 4WD trucks. Leaf spring I get, basic coil I get. What I've never had an opportunity to get a good look at is the one in my truck, a 96 k1500 Tahoe. For instance, I'm not sure how the torsion bars work into everything and how all the parts are situated considering there's a driveshaft going through the middle.
Brandonb
Rusted wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A torsion bar is an interesting system. A simple analogy of the torsion system. Think of a long bolt and a box end wrench on the head of the bolt. If you lock the other end in a vise and try to turn the wrench, the bolt will twist. Now replace the bolt with a rod that is heat treated to make it a straight spring. As you turn the wrench now, the rod because it is a spring, will resist the torque of the wrench more than the non heat treated steel bolt. When the force is let off the wrench, the rod will return the wrench back to the original position. Now connect the lose end of the wrench to the axle of the truck and the vise on the frame. As the axle pushes up against the wrench, its motion is resisted by the "torsion bar". Now while this is just a comparison, I hope you can visualize the system in use.
--
Lew Pratt
http://www.chevyk5blazer.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.