87 4x4 Steering Parts Hindering Ball Joint Replacement

A couple of weeks ago I replaced the passenger side upper and lower ball joints on my 87 4x4 3/4 ton. Now it's time to tackel the driver's side but, I'm hitting problems that weren't even concerns for the passenger
side. Namely, the steering arm that is bolted (with 3 bolts) to the spindle. I have removed the bolts but, cannot remove the steering arm from the spindle.
I have "torched" it. I have used about a gallon of penetrating oil. I have taken a die grinder and cut the rust along the line where the arm makes contact with the spindle. I have placed a bottle jack under the opposite side of the steering arm to supply constant tension and leverage. I have even torched it while the bottle jack was in place.
I am considering giving up but, I'm so close to having everything apart. Does anyone have a trick/hint that will help me win against this?
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I've had this same problem, i used an air hammer and it broke things free. It is basically the same concept as ball joints but there should be some cone shaped inserts around the bolts. Help this helps.

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"rmk700" wrote:

Basically you need to "break" it loose and a good smack that sets up a vibration in the metal can do the trick when a steady pressure will not. Set it on the jack again (resting steering arm on it under pressure) and give the arm a really strong whack of two (arm itself) neaxt to wear it contact hub assembly and be prepared for it to pop loose. (the bigger the hammer the better with a 2lb one or so being best
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go to autozone store and rent the right puller. they will refund your money when you return it. old john

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I rented the ball joint puller but, what tool is available to pry the steering arm from the spindle?
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

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"Jake292" wrote:

You are not going to pull it with a puller, use my method above. I know it looks like hammer mechanics but it is not. It works on the theory that when the metal is struck hard it set up a short sharp vibration in the metal the distorts and breaks the contact are between the parts. If you hit it correctly the to seperate masses with try to "vibrate" from the shock at different frenquecies and if the energy level (resonate vibration level diferentail) is high enough, the bond will break. This is why taking a hammer to something can do wonders sometimes. It will need one of 2 sharp heavy blows. For year I have easily seperated even the most subborn tie rod ends with no fuss or prying that can damage boots. My trick here is you take a 2 or 3 pound hammer and rest it against one side of the eye the end is through and hit the other side of the eye with one or two hard smacks with a 20 to 24oz hammer. It works every time It is all about the physics of impact/vibration energy transmission in metal parts.
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Got it. I removed the connecting rod from the steering arm (leaving the steering arm on the spindle). The machine shop guy was able to press the new ball joints into the spindle despite the steering arm.
Thanks for the suggestions.
jake292 wrote:

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