97 4*4 Tahoe Transmission Failure

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My truck is sitting at the local Goodwrench awaiting a remanufactured transmission. It cooked yesterday on the Coquihalla, fairly good climb for 20 km, was working perfectly, passed every import that flew past
me on the flat lands on the way up (I just leave the cruise set at 115K), seems Japanese horsepower are somewhat smaller than American ones. Anyway, back on topic, felt a shudder at the top of the hill when it backed off instead of the normal lockup, saw oil on the back window after a dash scan showed everything normal. Pulled over immediately and shut it down as I thought I blew a cooler line, but that was a mistake, oil boiled as soon as I shut it off! There was oil everywhere underneath, must be a breather as the cooler lines were dry.
My research on the internet today reveals that this 4L60E transmission is maybe not one of Chevrolet's prouder achievements for reliability, atleast in a '97 Tahoe. I however have paid my pound of flesh in depreciation as I bought this truck nearly new and am intending to keep it quite a while yet. This transmission worked flawlessly till the moment it died, with a shift quality that I can honestly say is second to none.
My main concern is that I want to get a longer life out of my next transmission. The dealer claims this "Goodwrench" transmission has all the updates. Warranty on the Goodwrench transmission is only 3 yr, 80000 km, the original transmission went 125,000 km so I doubt warranty will come into play as the transmission seems to be designed to last the length of the warranty anyway. Even though I do not pull a trailer, I am intending to install an auxiliary transmission cooler if this will help. I see larger oil sumps are available, even from GM. Is this larger sump possibly one of the updates on this new transmission? Is it worth installing an aftermarket temperature sensor or guage to monitor transmission condition? Too bad Chevrolet does not flash a light on the dash or something to indicate problems, I thought the electronic transmission might have monitored temperature and pressure.
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There have been numerous updates the the 4l60 trans since they have come out. It is now a much more reliable tranny. I would suggest to put and after marker cooler on also. Have them flush the existing cooler with the gm flush machine. It will test the cooler to make sure that it is flowing properly. On the extra cooler make sure that they still go through the existing cooler also.
Alan
zdriver wrote:

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WRONG. Make sure the new cooler is INDEPENDENT of the old cooler. The old one probably has chunks of metal in it, not all will get out. Power flushes can weaken the barriers between the tranny fluid and the engine coolant - causing contamination of one in the other - if not now then further down the road. And coolant into the tranny is a DEATH sentence. Now on the other hand, with an *independent* tranny cooler, there is never a possibility of this.
~KJ~

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RE/

Anybody know if GM has remedied the valve body problem?
--
PeteCresswell

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yes
no
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other than the change from on-off TCC operation to PWM then to controlled-slip, what changes ?

good grief
GM dealers will NOT intall an after-market external cooler

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Just be happy you don't own a earlier model Dodge or Plymouth Grand Minivan that blows transmissions every few years....There are SO many of them in the junkyards----assuming most from blown tranni's
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Speaking of which, my father own's a 95 caravan. Should I suggest anything to him to help him keep it alive?
~KJ~

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keep the fluid and filter changed
be very careful on icy streets, what kils them is allowing the wheels to start spinning and then hitting a dry spot.....the shock load will tear it up inside

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He's very good about not letting them spin - no traction if they don't spin. But I'll tell him anyways. It came with no manual, but I would figure about every 15k for the fluid?
~KJ~

of
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KJ wrote:

Don't forget to use the "special" fluid too 7176 I think is the number. The Havoline 7176 compatible did not work on mine (yes I owned one of those lemons). Also you have to use the special 7176 compatible gasket sealant for the pan, anything else will react with the 7176 fluid and soften up and leak. Be very careful of the antifreeze level and the engine temp, the electric radiator fan and A/C fan and compressor share the same fusable link, on a hot day after we bought ours the fan and ac running almost constantly caused the fusable link to blow which was wrapped so tight it burnt up several other wires. Fixed by warranty but it burnt up again later when the radiator overflow tank developed a slight leak in around the mottom mounting tab and let the fluid run low. I bought two fusable links and separated the radiator fan and ac system so they wouldn't take out each other.
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yes

many
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there is no prevention, the prob with the dodge trans was the diffpin letting go and flyin through the case. -Pete Re: 95 Dodge Caravan - TranSurgeon Group: alt.autos.4x4.chevy-trucks Date: Sun, Apr 4, 2004, 3:30pm (EDT+4) From: snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (KJ) Speaking of which, my father own's a 95 caravan. Should I suggest anything to him to help him keep it alive? ~KJ~
Just be happy you don't own a earlier model Dodge or Plymouth Grand Minivan that blows transmissions every few years....There are SO many of them in the junkyards----assuming most from blown tranni's
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On Sun, 4 Apr 2004 08:02:08 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (ken) wrote:

Really? My family had a REAL early model one of those, like 1988 Grand Voyager. It towed a pop-up camper from NY to SD the first summer we owned it, without a single problem. That van towed the same trailer many more times, including trips to Myrtle Beach, and even held up to a bigger trailer for a year or 2. Van was bought practically right off the car carrier in 1988, traded in in 1993 and I don't recall it having any tranny problems. Don't know the mileage that was put on it, but it was up there.
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BTDT - I put a Goodwrench warranteed Transmission in my 1996 GMC Yukon about a year ago. FWIW the warranteed gearbox broke after 8400 miles and 11 months. they of course replaced it under warranty but I'll never feel comfortable knowing there are some inherent weaknesses in that transmission. There are ( I understand) rebuilders who know about all of the GM weaknesses and can do an exchange with a substantially better warranty and know how to replace all of the standard GM parts with stronger ones. I am scared of this thing failing again and will move the truck ( as nice as it is along) the first chance I get. As with most things I'm sure GM goes with the lowest bidder for core rebuilds and you do not get what you paid for. It's easier for GM to pay the dealer to replace it. Remember the warranty of 3 Yrs. and 50,000 miles is only on the original rebuilt, not any subsequent replacements.
Bob

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Our local trans guru will tell you.
Your good wrench tranny will be exactly the same as the one that just fried. Go to a local independent shop that deals with allot of trucks. Put on the biggest cooler you can fit behind the grill. If you want a temp sensor, put it in the oil pan of the tranny.
~KJ~

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fried.
Put the ATF temp. sensor on the HOT line (outbound from AT to cooler) as this gives you the "worst case scenario" reading. Drilling and tapping a pan is just one more place for it to leak...................
Doc
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the trans gurus want to sell their snake oil. thats why they say that. gm also does the needed upgrades. -Pete
Re: 97 4*4 Tahoe Transmission Failure Group: alt.autos.4x4.chevy-trucks Date: Sun, Apr 4, 2004, 1:22pm (EDT+4) From: snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (KJ) Our local trans guru will tell you. Your good wrench tranny will be exactly the same as the one that just fried. Go to a local independent shop that deals with allot of trucks. Put on the biggest cooler you can fit behind the grill. If you want a temp sensor, put it in the oil pan of the tranny. ~KJ~
My truck is sitting at the local Goodwrench awaiting a remanufactured transmission. It cooked yesterday on the Coquihalla, fairly good climb for 20 km, was working perfectly, passed every import that flew past me on the flat lands on the way up (I just leave the cruise set at 115K), seems Japanese horsepower are somewhat smaller than American ones. Anyway, back on topic, felt a shudder at the top of the hill when it backed off instead of the normal lockup, saw oil on the back window after a dash scan showed everything normal. Pulled over immediately and shut it down as I thought I blew a cooler line, but that was a mistake, oil boiled as soon as I shut it off! There was oil everywhere underneath, must be a breather as the cooler lines were dry. My research on the internet today reveals that this 4L60E transmission is maybe not one of Chevrolet's prouder achievements for reliability, atleast in a '97 Tahoe. I however have paid my pound of flesh in depreciation as I bought this truck nearly new and am intending to keep it quite a while yet. This transmission worked flawlessly till the moment it died, with a shift quality that I can honestly say is second to none. My main concern is that I want to get a longer life out of my next transmission. The dealer claims this "Goodwrench" transmission has all the updates. Warranty on the Goodwrench transmission is only 3 yr, 80000 km, the original transmission went 125,000 km so I doubt warranty will come into play as the transmission seems to be designed to last the length of the warranty anyway. Even though I do not pull a trailer, I am intending to install an auxiliary transmission cooler if this will help. I see larger oil sumps are available, even from GM. Is this larger sump possibly one of the updates on this new transmission? Is it worth installing an aftermarket temperature sensor or guage to monitor transmission condition? Too bad Chevrolet does not flash a light on the dash or something to indicate problems, I thought the electronic transmission might have monitored temperature and pressure.
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really
then why do I see 00's and 01's with the SAME problems that first cropped up on the 96's and 97's ?
My truck is sitting at the local Goodwrench awaiting a remanufactured transmission. It cooked yesterday on the Coquihalla, fairly good climb for 20 km, was working perfectly, passed every import that flew past me on the flat lands on the way up (I just leave the cruise set at 115K), seems Japanese horsepower are somewhat smaller than American ones. Anyway, back on topic, felt a shudder at the top of the hill when it backed off instead of the normal lockup, saw oil on the back window after a dash scan showed everything normal. Pulled over immediately and shut it down as I thought I blew a cooler line, but that was a mistake, oil boiled as soon as I shut it off! There was oil everywhere underneath, must be a breather as the cooler lines were dry. My research on the internet today reveals that this 4L60E transmission is maybe not one of Chevrolet's prouder achievements for reliability, atleast in a '97 Tahoe. I however have paid my pound of flesh in depreciation as I bought this truck nearly new and am intending to keep it quite a while yet. This transmission worked flawlessly till the moment it died, with a shift quality that I can honestly say is second to none. My main concern is that I want to get a longer life out of my next transmission. The dealer claims this "Goodwrench" transmission has all the updates. Warranty on the Goodwrench transmission is only 3 yr, 80000 km, the original transmission went 125,000 km so I doubt warranty will come into play as the transmission seems to be designed to last the length of the warranty anyway. Even though I do not pull a trailer, I am intending to install an auxiliary transmission cooler if this will help. I see larger oil sumps are available, even from GM. Is this larger sump possibly one of the updates on this new transmission? Is it worth installing an aftermarket temperature sensor or guage to monitor transmission condition? Too bad Chevrolet does not flash a light on the dash or something to indicate problems, I thought the electronic transmission might have monitored temperature and pressure.
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RE/

My guess: the execs at GM need a major attitude adjustment.
--
PeteCresswell

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