Air Compressor Size & Usage

Hello,
I just received a "Speedy Sprayer" made by the 'W R Brown Corporation' from my uncle's estate. I'm not entirely convinced it will be of any
use other than for paint or pesticide spraying and hoped I might be able to get some details or insight here. It's pretty old (1960s) and I'd hoped to pick up an all around good compressor to keep around for airing up tires, etc; but notice it only has a pressure range of 30-45psi and doesn't seem to have a lot of flow. It seems to run pretty good but again, not a lot of noticeable flow or pressure (pressure at approx 40psi peak). Would you mind telling me what you might know about it or would appreciate any advice on a good automotive compressor where compressor pressures is concerned.
Thanks, John
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On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 18:05:37 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com"

If it works for what you want to use it for, use it. You didn't mention CFM or tank size, so there's not much to go on. If it works for filling a tire and blowing out dust then you're ahead of not having any compressor for that. Tire filling and light nail gun use compressors run $50-100. They're probably a lot noisier and won't last as long as that old thing you have. Belt-driven?
A barely decent automotive compressor that will run tools cost $200 and up. I have a 3-gallon pancake compressor for filling tires and trim nailing. I don't like it but it does those jobs and is easily tucked away so I live with it. It puts out 100 psi but is low volume and noisy as hell. So filling a 16" tire from 10 to 30 pounds might take 5 minutes of compressor noises. Still faster than going to the gas station and popping quarters in their machine.
I hate that cheap-ass sound these oil-less compressors make and a good belt-driven 30 gallon is high on my wish list.
You have to decide exactly what you need a compressor for before you talk much about compressors.
--Vic
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snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

Not enough information. A cheap ($15) 12 volt compressor will work for tires and air mattresses and it is portable.
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On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 18:05:37 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com"

Your pressure range and application indicates it is a diaphram, low pressure compressor. Suitable for occasional airing up of tires (slow, but it will work) and use with *that* spray gun (not commercial guns, which require many more CFMs.)
Value? None, really. Not enough power to run air-tools, for example.
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If I'm correct your referring to the Speedy Sprayer Spray gun. Sears and Roebuck? I think I have one along with the 20 gal compressor, again 45psi. Let me check... Mine is a Sears branded gun, and is rated 3.5cfm. You can get a pressure regulator and use that to lower the pressure from a modern compressor. I don't think they make 'Paint sprayer' compressors anymore.
Cheers
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