Alternator Failure: Some kind of warning device?

Page 2 of 2  
Per Dafey:

Of course it is....-)
But I'm an excessive/compulsive kind of guy...
I suspect it's also a carryover from when I used the vehicle for business - tax reporting and all that.
--
PeteCresswell

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(PeteCresswell) wrote:

I do the same, miles and engine hours now that I have it. Then it goes in a spreadsheet which calculates the miles per gallon, average miles gallon and now even average miles per hour as well as operating cost. An unexpected drop in miles per gallon could be an early warning to something wrong so it may pay off someday. Just write the info on the receipt from the gas station and fill it in sometime later when I get home.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I used to do it that way, now I keep it all in a backedup comptuer recod for all vehicle I have including tractor and mowers, I usually do not put in the cost though.

Well the old 350 is a sound motor and can do 250K easy, the problem is the rest of the truck. I think you have a chance at it is you change the axle lubes, tranny and Tcase lubes every 30K or so and if you have not done so yet, start now. Also change engine oil a nbit more often as miles rack up as that can help a lot as oil gets dirtier sooner as engine wears and changing it more often minimizes the effects from this. Also, watch engine temps and coolant condition as it ages because when a older engine start to run hot it can shorten its life so find cause and deal with it. I use 60/40 or better as it protects engine better as the age als the less water that is present the less galvantic reaction there is to surpress. Some would debate this but my 89 cooling system is clean a new runing 70/30. Lived out in Montana for a spell in 90's and 50/50 would not cut it at all and 60/40 was marginal at time where I was so I settle on 70/30 and still use it today. Mater a fact my coolant has not been changed in the vehcile for 9 years now and it still is as clean as day one and it never even thinks of overheating either still. The 4L60 tranny you have is a good one basically but it has had some issues with valve body as you well know. It is basically a electronically controlled version of the 700R4 I have (different valve body) which has proven to be a very reliable tranny for some. (87 and later models where the best of theses) ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
El Fri, 30 Jun 2006 01:16:11 +0000, SnoMan escribi:

I'm going to give your 7 PSI cap idea a try. With a new 14 PSI cap per the owner's manual, as soon as the shop patches one leak in my ancient but newly flushed radiator, another leak appears. But what advantage does a 70/30 mix give you over the normal 50/50? I thought that increasing the ratio of ethylene glycol to water beyond 50/50 will lower rather than raise the boiling temperature of the liquid.
Warren Post Santa Rosa de Copn, Honduras
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My 85 s15 Jimmy made it 148500 on its first,my 91 s10 blazer is at 12099 on its 1st.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Same thing happened to me a couple of years ago with my Lumina. However I noticed a number of warnings. First, the a/c fan began to run slower and slower, the radio quit playing, then 3-4 miles later the engine died and power steering and power brakes died. All your wife needs to do to get multiple warnings is 1) check the dash guages/warning light periodically, 2) always run the a/c fan on 3 or higher and 3) always listen to the radio.
I was heading to the auto repair shop I have used since the 70s when my Lumina totally died and I had to call a wrecker to tow me the rest of the way.
Ron
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I drive for a living so I have developed the habit to check everything while driving. I would have to guess I glance at my dash at least every 5 minutes. Not stare just a glance will let you know if something is wrong. I check my mirrors nearly constantly. My radio is never loud and I very rarely talk on the phone while driving. If someone calls me its usually " if its not important I'll call ya back later". In nearly 2 million miles I have never been broke down beside the road other than a flat. I have several alternator failures, u joint failures, hoses break and so on but have always caught them before I was sittin on the side of the road. I have never had a at fault accident. Have been involved in 3 accidents, 2 serious and the last one just over a month ago. All 3 have been caused by the other driver being distracted, two because they were on the phone. Couple years ago my wife was reaching in the back seat (dumb donkey), dropped off the road edge, over corrected and rolled it.. Now am I bragging on my driving skills? Yea a little bit, I deserve it with almost 2 million miles. But my point is people do not take driving or they're vehicles seriously any more. There are way too many cell phones, TV's and other distractions in a vehicle now. You get in your car and focus on the task at hand. No driving in the left lane 45 reading the paper or putting on makeup, no wandering around lanes dialing a phone and no reaching in the backseat. If you are not doing all of that you have time to glance at a gauge and maybe hear that tire start to whine before it blows. I watched a program on the German Autobahn (spell check). It is difficult and very expensive to get a license, traffic laws are strictly enforced, people take driving seriously and one driver said most cars weren't even equipped with drink holders because drivers didn't need them, no multitasking. The Autobahn has a lower crash rate than US Interstates and over there the average speed is 120 mph and can reach over 200. I'm not saying any of this contributed to the OP's problems but in general more people need to focus on driving and the vehicle they are in. In the trucking industry lawsuits and rampant, following the scenario of the OP if my vehicle was stranded in the center lane and caused a pileup I would guarantee I would be sued and someone would get lots of money. In California a truck driver ran out of fuel and pulled to the shoulder. A driver who was at the time legally drunk and tested positive for drugs ran off the side of the road, hit the semi and was killed. The truck driver was arrested and charged with vehicular homicide and the family won a undisclosed amount of money. The courts ruled the driver was partially at fault because he had not verified his fuel gauge was correctly working during his daily vehicle inspection. The homicide charge was reduced but he still spent jail time. Did I mention the other driver was drunk? Might want to look at your gauges every now and then.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Per David Johnson:

I've driven on-and-off in Germany occasionally for the past 30-some years. Haven't been over there in the last 10 - and maybe it's all changed because of the European Union....and I don't speak German to boot.
Having said that, what I perceive from experience is that there seem to be only a few rules: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 1) Always yield the hammer lane to closing traffic. If they have to slow down, you didn't yield soon enough - and you'll definitely know when that happens.
2) Always, under all circumstances, without any exceptions use your turn signal when crossing any sort of white line. If a truck is parked partially on the traffic lane going through a town, you'll see car after car put on their left turn signal as they straddle the center line to pass it. Turning it on as you cross the line isn't good enough. It has to be blinking before you initiate your move.
3) Never, ever, under any circumstances pass on the right. This greatly facilitates adherence to #1.
4) When coming off an onramp, look for an opening, downshift, and come off pedal-to-the-metal. (that's almost verbatim from the English translation of my 80-some-year-old father-in-law's admonition...) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
One of my other relatives confirms the claim of fewer accidents (lower death rate by his version) on the German autobahns than USA's limited-access roads.
I find this even more impressive when I realize that not only are people routinely exceeding 100 mph - with the crazies doing 150+ in Porsches - but many of them are driving *very* small (i.e. not particularly crashworthy) vehicles AND all that is going on in the context of triple tractor trailers pulling out to pass at 35-45 mph.
As far as attention to driving goes... I've watched a 25-year-old nephew literally sweat while driving. I suspect that drunk driving there is not much of an issue because anybody who drove drunk would have an exceedingly short life expectancy.
--
PeteCresswell

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Same thing here. I scan the mirrors and dash every 5-7 minutes regardless of what I'm driving. Just being a good driver. If your to lazy to check the vehicles operation while your behind the wheel, WALK. Way to many lazy, distracted and just plain piss poor drivers on the road. One of the things I hate about a lot of the states now is the way they are extending the renewals on drivers licenses. I would agree with it IF they did real testing every time instead of just looking at an eye chart and sign your name. I'd rather see a written test and a driving skills test every 6 years for EVERYONE who want to drive.
--
Steve W.
Life is not like a box of chocolates
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.