anti-slip axles versus electronic anti-slip

Help! Does anyone have experience with both of these forms of traction enhancements. I am looking at new trucks and don't feel I need a 4x4 if I get an anti-slip 4x2. My problem is some offer anti-slip rear
axles and some accomplish anti-slip using the ant-lock brake system to switch traction to the other wheel. Which is best for street and what are the pros and cons of each system?
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On 14 Jan 2004 16:11:32 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@netzero.com wrote:

I personally don't care for electronic traction "enhancement".... people should just learn how to drive. mechanical locking diffs aren't a 100% replacement for 4wd..... when the rear is locked under slippery conditions, the truck will have very poor lateral stability... i.e. the rear will swing out. why this happens is because with a locked rear end you don't have a non-spining wheel to keep the vehicle tracking properly. I find having 4wd (used only when it's needed) to be much more predictable.
HTH, Bret
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excessive wear and tear on brakes and components?
wrote:

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Willy Wanka wrote:

I've heard of people adding a second parking brake line to do the same thing mechanically. The electric ones do eat brakes though from what I've read/heard.
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in off road racing the hand brakes are sometimes split to aid in turning - sort of like on farm tractors
wrote:

traction
to
what
thing
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snipped-for-privacy@netzero.com wrote:

That's a good question... I'm really not faimiliar with the braking type of traction control, but I can say that I'm not much of a fan of the Eaton mechanical locker, code "G80" in any GM.
I feel as thought it engages to abruptly, and never when you really need it to.
For instance, my driveway is at a slight incline. I have no problems getting up it with mild amounts of fresh snow on it, but when it packs down after a couple of days, it can get pretty slippery. If I stop at a slick section, and accelerate gently, one wheel will probably slip, it may spin up to the 200rpm engagement point, where it kicks power to the other wheel. The big jolt just breaks the other tire loose, and the locker gets a little confused because everythings spinning at the same rate... it'll usually unlock, and repeat this all over again in a rather fast rate. A couple "bumps" every few seconds.
I see that the GM brocure said something about it being good for slippery boat ramps, or something like that... I've never had the truck on a boat ramp or any other slippery surface other than snow, so I'm not sure how it works in that area.
I'd rather see something like the good old clutch pack or one of those newer gear driven "Z-name" limited slips like the F-body's (Camaro, Firebird) have. (I can't remember the name of it) I think even the new Jeep TJ's are using these -- the Rubicon also gets the e-locker on top of it)
-marc
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Well the H2 uses the brake system to control it. I don't know what that tells us though. Cadillacs have it too. Only problem is when you have independent suspension and one side becomes disconnected you are stuck and have absolutely no way out. (I only mention it because my POS cadillac did it to me 2 times)
Corey

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