Blazer S-10 Lug Stud Removal

I unfortunately broke my one of the wheel lug studs when putting on my spare tire. Does anybody know if the stud is threaded in or press fitted, and how to get it out and put a new one in? Any experteise on
this situation would be greatly appreciated.
--
Posted using the http://www.autoforumz.com interface, at author's request
Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet standards
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"miltons" wrote: > I unfortunately broke my one of the wheel lug studs when > putting on my spare tire. Does anybody know if the stud is > threaded in or press fitted, and how to get it out and put a > new one in? Any experteise on this situation would be greatly > appreciated.
your wheel studs should be press fitted in. if so, then you can CAREFULLY hammer out the old broken stud with a punch and a heavy hammer. After its out, start the new stud in the hole as far as you can with your hand. Screw the lug nut onto the stud until the nut is against the hub, then use an air impact gun to pull the stud into place.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"diamondjim" wrote: > your wheel studs should be press fitted in. if so, then you > can CAREFULLY hammer out the old broken stud with a punch and > a heavy hammer. After its out, start the new stud in the hole > as far as you can with your hand. Screw the lug nut onto the > stud until the nut is against the hub, then use an air impact > gun to pull the stud into place.
If i do not have an impact wrench, will the tire iron work, or will it not pull in the stud well enough? Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Use some washers between the lug and the hub. Then, you could just use a 19mm (I think, that's what my 2000 uses) socket and a ratchet or breaker bar. Maybe pick up a spare lugnut, as this MAY put a burr on the seat side of the one you use. Then just keep that one as a spare, or for this purpose.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
... a liberal spraying of penetrating oil to remove the broken stud...
... and a nice coating of anti-seize compound on the threads of the new stud...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Front - Jack up the vehicle and pull the tire/rim. Use a good punch and heavy hammer to drive the broken stud out. Remove the brake caliper and rotor. Install the new stud as far as possible by hand. Make sure it starts square in the hole. Put some anti seize or light oil on the threads and stack some washers over the threads so you don't have to put the nut on so far. Use a standard nut of the proper size (metric I believe) NOT a lug nut and tighten it down with a breaker bar and deep well socket. Watch to make sure it is seated all the way, then remove the nut/washers. Reinstall the brake rotor and caliper, tire/rim and use a NEW lug nut on that new stud.
Rear - Jack up vehicle, remove tire/rim and remove brake rotor. Use a punch/heavy hammer and drive the broken stud out. Installing the new one means you may have to rotate the axle some to get it into the hole, sometimes things are in the way (wheel cylinder, brake shoes, brake center pin). Then proceed as you would for the front. Reinstall the brake drum (check the brakes for wear/leakage/damage while your there) Re-install the tire/rim and enjoy.
Do NOT install the new stud using the rim as a backer for the nut, REAL possible to bend or crack the rim with the nut. Then you buy a new rim as well as a stud. Do not leave the rotor in place while torque in the new stud. It can damage the rotor enough to cause pulsating brakes.
--
Steve Williams
Near Cooperstown, New York
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.