Break Drum removal - needed a home-made puller

Today got around to pulling the beak drums whatever it took... It took me quite a while (3hrs) and it wasn't good enough to just hammer it (got a good hammer and I am strong (and phew got strong tryin)).
After hammerin my ass off I tried prying it against the dust cover (that is actually stronger than they used to be). Then I tried a good hammer angel with a chizel to aim. Still stuck. Then I tried the break adjuster (later learned that even though they were loosed they didn't collapse). Finally, I constructected a puller. I used a black pipe 1"x ~15", and first cut holes in the middle and ends so I could pull with foundation bolts and a harmonic ballancer puller. The founation bolts didn't grab well enough and I ended up welding rail-road-spikes into the end-holes. At last!!! they pulled with the harmonic ballancer puller pushing against the axil in the middle (the 2nd one was also stuck but pulled easy with this nice puller). Once they were off I could see there was a ring of dust that was formed into a body-putty-like lip. I ground it off with a grinder-pad on my circular saw. Replaced the shoes (thought they weren't totally wipped). When putting back together, the first (most stuck) took some hammering and -wow- one of the wieghts fell off. I welded it back on, cooled it, and the rest was easy - back together fine. The best suggestion from the group was to the loosen of the e-brake adjusters, but it didn't work. In the end I had the satisfaction of fabricating a puller that can pull any drum that size with ease (my 80 camaro pulls off hard too). Anyone want one? I can make-em (specify drum-widths - probably $20 - use with your harmonica ballancer puller). Is the puller idea new??? It didn't seem well supported in the prior thread. Maybe better would be an air-based puller to just pop them quick. Anyone know of other drums this hard to pull??? (I'm 40 and have done about 50 drum pulls without experiencing this situation before). Is this a 1 in 50 situation or < 1 in 1000??? The puller didn't hurt the break hardware but did leave marks across the old-shoes (that weren't completely warn out). Thanks, Elliott
Troy wrote:

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Did you try hitting it right near the lugs on the axel to loosen the rust? That one has always worked for me. It can still be hard to get of but at least it will move. Backing the shoes off will help but only after it is loose from the axle.

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I had the same problem years ago. To solve the rust to the axle problem I made homemade gaskets with a paper I use at work called "fishpaper" it is used to insulate power cable connections and is used in the electrical field to shield motors, stators etc. It does not burn up, although it can get very hot. You do not have to do anything to the paper as it already contains a resin embedded in the paper. It is quite stiff about as thick as the spiral notebook covers kids use for school. It is not a consumer sold product but available to electricians, engineers, etc.. I know it is a little expensive but I always have nice size scraps to make gaskets from it. It does not absorb moisture.
The idea came to me when rebuilding an older model 1937 Chevy truck and when looking through the manual it had this paper gasket, also noticed it on vehicles up into the 50's.
It has worked for me.
Jon

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It wasn't rust to the axil (that part was clear and it was still stuck more than I could hammer/pull by hand). It was the fact that the ebrake adjuster didn't loosen (froze) and the rim of body-puddy-like substance around the outside of the break drum not clearing the shoes. The home-made puller was the only way to get them off.
Rebus Knebus wrote:

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OK got ya, it was the shoes holding them on.......

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For what it's worth I just pulled my rear drums and struggled for 15 min or so till I got out my propane torch. I heated the drum face near the hub and the drums literally popped off. No puller, no sweat...
--
David
1964 Karmann Ghia coupe
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. Re: Break Drum removal - needed a home-made puller Group: alt.autos.4x4.chevy-trucks Date: Sun, Sep 14, 2003, 8:54pm (CDT-1) From: snipped-for-privacy@interbaun.cm (DavidW)
For what it's worth I just pulled my rear drums and struggled for 15 min or so till I got out my propane torch. I heated the drum face near the hub and the drums literally popped off. No puller, no sweat... .
Dear Dave, Because the heat on the CAST drum face caused the metal to expand and WARP, which in turn created a force against the axle flange that was able to exceed the resistance being caused by either rust, a grooved brake drum, or a combination of the two. Once warped.....always warped. Though not neccessarily unfunctional. We can discuss the effects of heat on tensel strength another day, along with the swish-swish sound and pulsing pedal that "can" accompany this technique.
Brakes 101:
chapter 1:
"Never,ever....never,never...ever......never.... heat a drum to get it off!!!"
chapter 2:
unless you have to, then by all means get the job done
Scribb Abel
The smartest man I ever met............. Never said a word.
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