Changing the timing belt on my car. Need advice.

Hi. I have an '86 Mitsubishi Cordia and I am trying to change the timing belt on my car. I'm waiting to see if someone will lend me a chain wrench in order to remove the pulley in the crankshaft spot. In the
meantime, I thought i'd ask a few questions.
After I put both the car's timing belts properly aligned, will the car be good to go after everything else is put back exactly the way it was? For example, will the spark plug cables work in the same position as they were before the belts broke or will the cables need to be readjusted somehow? What i'm trying to ask is: is the're another step after you install the timing belt? For some reason, I think that i'm going to install the belts and the car is not going to work properly. Any tips? Thanks
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Even though this is a GM group and you have a Mitsubishi, I'll try and answer anyway. If a belt broke, the cams will have to be re-timed against the crankshaft. You won't be changing the firing order, but you will be re-setting the cams so that the valves open and close when they're supposed to. Besides that, I have no input on this matter...
On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 14:02:40 -0400 (EDT), snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (leviathan) wrote:

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Not to mention, was it RUNNING when it broke? I have a 72' that I ran till the timing chain slipped...NOT FUN LOTS OF LOST MONEY
CHECK THE COMPRESSION OF EVERY CYLINDER, CHECK THE VALVE MOTION OF EVERY VALVE, CHECK THE TRUE-NESS OF EVERY PUSH ROD (if your jap crap has rods, if overhead forget the rods)
My best suggestion: bring it to someone so you can blame them when it doesn't work

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From: snipped-for-privacy@REMOVEworldnet.att.net (KJ)

>chain slipped...NOT FUN LOTS OF LOST >MONEY

>OF EVERY VALVE, CHECK THE >TRUE-NESS OF EVERY PUSH ROD (if your >jap crap has rods, if overhead forget the rods)

I am poor and I can't afford something better. I'll either have to fix this car myself because I have little money and the mechanic told me it costs $240 to fix or i'll have to be without a car. It's my transportation and I don't care what make and model it is. Try not to be so immature and as hard as it may be for you.
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Yes, I am immature, and yes I am poor, and yes I am right. Doesn't matter what your rollin on, when it comes to penny pinching the best is the guy WITH the best bet, not your best guess. Get a warranted repair, or at least check what I told you to. Check it all, twice. If you don't you'll be out the $60 bux for the timing chain, you'll bend your valves when you have it 2 teeth off, or you'll get it on and find it wont start because your valves are already bent. No I didn't make fun of you, I gave you sound advice, but what does that matter? BTW: I paid less for my truck than you'd pay for your fix - don't tell me what poor means.

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From: snipped-for-privacy@REMOVEworldnet.att.net (KJ)

>on, when it comes to penny pinching the best >is the guy WITH the best bet, not your best >guess. Get a warranted repair, or at least >check what I told you to. Check it all, twice. If >you don't you'll be out the $60 bux for the >timing chain, you'll bend your valves when >you have it 2 teeth off, or you'll get it on and >find it wont start because your valves are >already bent. No I didn't make fun of you, I >gave you sound advice, but what does that >matter? BTW: I paid less for my truck than >you'd pay for your fix - don't tell me what poor >means.
It's not the type of car that bends the vales when the timing belt breaks. I have to do this or send the car to the junk yard. Actually, the car was going to the junkyard but I then decided i'm going to do this. It's not rocket science.
Back to the original point though, I was worried about the spark plug cables and their positions after installing the timing belts. I also asked for tips (maybe commonly overlooked stuff when performing this type of procedure).
Someone already mentioned that the cables can go exactly the way they were and that they don't change position after changing the timing belts.
Besides that, I was wondering if I can turn the car on for a a few seconds after installing the timing belts but before installing the pulleys in order to see of the engine works correctly. Obviously, if the car has no alternator belt installed, it wont last too long turned on. But the reason why I ask this is because i'm worried about making a mistake after putting everything back together and having to tear the car apart again.
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Thats what I was hoping with my car. It's a pain I know, but I'd at least look at the valves. CHECK YOUR DAMN VALVES

No, but you are at a miss.... Valves and timing can be done by the average joe in a dirt driveway, but you need to do it right.

No, the firing order will be the same if you replace the timing chain, the blinker light, or the driver. Commonly over looked stuff would be if you tapped the valves because the car was running when the belt blew.... Most cars ARE contact engines... CHECK YOUR DAMN VALVES

No, do not change the plug wires around. They will always, always be the same. CHECK YOUR DAMN VALVES

Better yet, you can remove the valve covers and check the valves. Then, WITH THE BATTERY DISCONNECTED find the bolt that attaches to the crank shaft, and turn that over. Watch the valves operate - if they open and close the proper amount, at the proper times your half way there. Your brand-new-shiny haynes manual should tell you the fireing order, and then you should be able to do the math after that. You'll need to find TDC on cylendar1 anyways, unless you removed it for replacement, you'll have to move shit around.

Only until the battery dies. Could be hours depending on the car and what kind of lights you leave on....

You will make a mistake if you don't; CHECK THE DAMN VALVES
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side of the road every time I drove it a few hundred miles - couldn't afford anything else
You've gotten some good advice now run with it. Get a manual, some tools and a friend that has some experience in these matters. As long as the belt didn't fail with the engine running, it'll run again. Take your time, label everything as you disconnect it and finally, check and re-check everything you do.
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From: snipped-for-privacy@levyclan.nospam.us (MikeLevy)

>belt broke, the cams will have to be re-timed >against the crankshaft. You won't be >changing the firing order, but you will be >re-setting the cams so that the valves open >and close when they're supposed to. Besides >that, I have no input on this matter...
Thanks for the info.
I have a question for anyone: When this person said "aligning the cam with the crankshaft", does this mean aligning the timing marks on the engine's various sprockets to the required notches, marks, etc. or is this alignment of the cam and crankshaft done some other way? Thanks.
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go to your local auto parts store and spend 13 bucks on a Haynes book.... it will give you instructions on how to re-align the cams on your particular motor.
-Bret
(Mike Levy)

>belt broke, the cams will have to be re-timed >against the crankshaft. You won't be >changing the firing order, but you will be >re-setting the cams so that the valves open >and close when they're supposed to. Besides >that, I have no input on this matter...
Thanks for the info.
I have a question for anyone: When this person said "aligning the cam with the crankshaft", does this mean aligning the timing marks on the engine's various sprockets to the required notches, marks, etc. or is this alignment of the cam and crankshaft done some other way? Thanks.
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From: snipped-for-privacy@notgonnatellya.net (BretChase)

>instructions on how to re-align the cams on >your particular motor.
I'm using that book, and the factory service manual for my specific car. The car is sohc by the way.
I wanted to know if the spark plug cables needed to be readjusted or if they needed to be reinstalled the same exact way they were positioned before removal. I also wanted tips.
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the plug wires go on the same... the whole point to replacing the belt is that the alignment of the critical engine components (crank and cam) are in the EXACT relative positions that they were in before the timing belt broke. other than that, I can't offer tips as I have no familiarity with this motor.
-Bret
(Bret Chase)

>instructions on how to re-align the cams on >your particular motor.
I'm using that book, and the factory service manual for my specific car. The car is sohc by the way.
I wanted to know if the spark plug cables needed to be readjusted or if they needed to be reinstalled the same exact way they were positioned before removal. I also wanted tips.
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Well , you indicated that you are replacing a belt, not a broken one. In that case, the answer is Yes just line up the timing marks, should be ;) If the belt broke, its a different story.
Tip: head on over to your local library or call around. See if they have the Mitchells service manuals for your car. This way you can find out where the timing marks are and do it with confidence.
Cheers

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