Chevy tracker?

Is it okay if I ask about a 98 Tracker here? I know it's not _really_ a truck, but it _is_ a Chevy and it _is_ a 4x4.
Anyway, how big is the gas tank? Can't find the info in the manual that
came with it.
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Warren Oates wrote:

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http://www.carkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/chevrolet-trucks/200608/1
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On Wed, 30 Aug 2006 03:11:51 GMT, "eagle0801 via CarKB.com"

Not in a tracker or any other Geo. Try 11 gallons and it is also built with Suzuki parts with a chevy emblem. They changed the name of it from Geo Tracker to Chevy Track in 97 but still the same vehicle. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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Actually, a more careful reading of the manual provides me with the info that it holds 11.5 gallons, or 55 litres. Hmm. My last car was a Suzuki Swift.
I've seen a GMC Tracker around, as well as Suzuki, and there was something called Asuna.
Thanks for the replies.
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On Wed, 30 Aug 2006 07:52:41 -0400, Warren Oates

I comment for you. Several years ago I worked with a friend that thought they would be a nice vehicle to drive to work. It scared him to death in winter when he came in one day white as a sheet. That short wheelbase and rear wheel drive can be a heart attack on icy roads. He went out and bought some stuuded tires for it after that day for winter usage and found it much improved. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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Thanks for that. I'll look into a good set of winter tires for it. Right now it's got Michelin X-one, about which I know nothing. The little notice inside the door says the tires should be inflated to 23 psi, which seems a bit soft to me, but my last two cars were much smaller and lighter.
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On Wed, 30 Aug 2006 11:49:17 -0400, Warren Oates

That is because the tire are larger relative to vehicle size/weight so they need less pressure for load on them. I would run at least 28 though as it will reduce rolling resistance, improve handling a bit and MPG a bit too at the expense of just a little harsher ride at times. Do look into some serious ice tires for rear, not just a all season tire if you do not like surprizes. I put studded tires on the rear of my wife 2000 cherokee because though I warned her (she had to have it) that it would be nasty on ice she had to find out the hard way. Before that the car was scary on icy roads but with studded rear tires it is a stable little tank on ice and has never tried to even think about swapping ends on ice with them . I have a extra set of rims that I keep the tires mounted on and just swap out rear tires and rims in winter. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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What effect would having different tires front and rear have on the 4-wheel drive?
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On Thu, 31 Aug 2006 09:40:52 -0400, Warren Oates

You can stud all of them but the biggst problem with a rear wheel drive car on ice in keeping the rear end behind you which studded tires will do even on wet ice from freezing rain. You do not want to really be running 4x4 to move on ice for a few big reasons, first, you cannot steer out of a skid in 4x4 becuse the tires will need to turn at different speeds in a skid to maintain contact traction for directional control and 4x4 prevents this. When you get in a skid in 4x4 your only change to get control is to have presence of mind to take it out of 4x4 and then try to get it under control. The next one is if you have ABS, it will not work at all or properly in 4x4. i have been plowing snow for over 20 years and I get out on roads when they are at there worst a lot. I do run 4 studded tires on my plow trucks in winter for safty and traction when working on ice but I always transport from site to site in 2wd and the 4 studded tires give me better braking and directional control when plowing on icy surfaces with plow side forces on truck and with a working weight approaching 5 ton or more at times. I can go out to service clients even in a ice storm without white knuckles with them and even my wifes 2wd Cherokee with rear studs will shame a 4x4 one without them on ice. More than once her coworkers have wondered how she gets around so well on ice with her 2wd Jeep when others with 4x4 versions struggle and go in the ditch sometimes. She had on friend by a Jeep grand cherokee one summer in place of a FWD car and spent one winter with it on ice and a few trips to the ditch and got rid of it the next summer. Her studded 2wd Jeep can take off on glare ice with little effort while 4x4's with all season tires struggle. If you brake hard on lock front tires on ice there is no tendancy to swap ends at all with studs on rear and steering control resumes as soon as brakes are released some. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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Thanks again. I will definitely go see our local tire guy about studded tires for the rear. There's probably some law about when you can put them on (and when you have to take them off), if I know Ontario ...
Anyway, your information comes at a good time -- I've got about 2 months before I have to start worrying about ice.
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[replying to my own article]
That didn't take long to find, oh my Google. Studded tires are illegal in the part of Ontario where I live (they're only legal in Northern Ontario, which is a strictly defined area). What would be a good substitute?
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On Thu, 31 Aug 2006 15:59:50 -0400, Warren Oates

Illegal all year long? that is strange. Try "Blizzak" tires as a second choice. (search google using that term) ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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LOL run it dry then fill it up and see how many gallons it takes.
-------------------------------------------------------------- When Religion ruled the world , they called it the dark ages...
Don Farr Roswell NM 88203 D-farr AT cableone DOT net --------------------------------------------------------------
wrote:<BR><BR>&gt;I've seen a GMC Tracker around, as well as Suzuki, and there was <BR>&gt;something called Asuna.<BR><BR><BR>I comment for you. Several years ago I worked with a friend that<BR>thought they would be a nice vehicle to drive to work. It scared him<BR>to death in winter when he came in one day white as a sheet. That<BR>short wheelbase and rear wheel drive can be a heart attack on icy<BR>roads. He went out and bought some stuuded tires for it after that day<BR>for winter usage and found it much improved. <BR>-----------------<BR>TheSnoMan.com</BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>
------=
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Heh. Wouldn't be the first time.
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I have a 94 geo tracker 4x4. about an 11 gal tank. I would rather drive it on ice than my 2500HD plow trucks. It handles like a jeep wrangler. It is light enough to regain control. I would stay away from studs. They lessen traction on dry pavement. The first year I plowed I used studs and had many complaints about the scratches left in the customers driveways. Since then just non studded tires and have had no problems. We only get 2-3 ice events, a year, hear but lots of snow. Ice only lasts till the salt hits it so it is never a big driving issue for very long. I am impressed with the abilities of this little car. It will pull though tough conditions better than most vehicles on the road today.

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What tires are you running on it? We live in a pretty temperate area, stuck out in the middle of Lake Ontario (opposite Oswego NY), winters are mostly mild with quite a bit of wet snow; like you say, ice isn't really a problem since the sand and salt trucks get out on it right away.
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Goodyear wrangler RT
wrote:

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