Costs to replace fuel pump - '99 Suburban

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OK, I don't know what Google has done, but you can no longer search news servers!
What is the average charge for the part and the labor to replace the fuel
pump in a '99 Suburban 1500 2WD. It appears the wonderful electric fuel pump suddenly quit on my wife today. Fortunately it was right in front of the house! It's had a flaky jittery sensor for about a year now allowing the fuel gauge to jump to F and then shake while running where the actual level is. Well, today it just stopped. No pump whine when the key is turned to ON and no start. Have to love electronic components like these!!!
Looking at AutoZone and NAPA, it appears the pump assembly is between $269 and $293! Now what is the expected labor costs. Will be checking with the local stealer and another local shop in the morning, but wanted to see what others have seen.
Thanks!
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If you can find a good independent shop expect between $400 and $500, they are going to mark the pump up and charge labor. At the dealership expect between $500 and $700, and they will only use an AC Delco part. I would imagine you can find a shade tree shop to do it for around $350. As to loving electric parts like that, yeah sure do, you got an 8 year old vehicle whose fuel pump runs at a higher pressure than the mechanical ones, and has no diaphragm to blow and fill the crankcase with fuel. They move a tremendous amount of fuel, remember there is a return line on fuel injection, mechanicals only move the 24 gallons in the tank once. On your pricing, the "Master" brand is junk. replace the sock as well as the pump, and if it has a pulsator replace it as well.
Whitelightning
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see there is a fuel solenoid and a fuse under the hood and hope to check those first in the morning. Can't imagine I'd get that lucky! Any way to actually test the solenoid? Continuity? Will it cause no action? Would think it could.
I won't be tackling it myself should it actually need replacing. Just don't have the time or desire to mess with it in the colder and very wet weather. The frustration just comes from the part's inaccessibility. Sure the fuel cools and lubes it, but it seems there would be another way to mount it on the frame and still intercool it.
Kevin
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coil can be fine cold, but as soon as a load hits the break in the windings pulls apart.. Relay runs about $14. As to fuse, yeah sometimes they just blow, but usually they blow for a reason. and it could be something as simple as a bad ground.

Nissan tried frame mounting fuel pumps on the early fuel injected z models and they had very high failure rates. VW air cooled tried the same thing and had issues as well. Course the way fuel pressure was regulated may have had something to do with that as well. They varied voltage to the pump to control output. Electric fuel pumps are pushers, and the closer to the fuel source the better they work. Low pressure pumps, like the generic diaphram style used on carbed engines run fairly cool, and they dont run constantly, when fuel pressure builds they stop, when it drops they start, but the higher pressure rotary pumps needed for fuel injection run hotter. Some of the ricers have gotten smart and have an access panel over the fuel pump area, but thats another soucre for rust, and if the panel isnt properly sealed when its re-installed, water entry into the car. and I have seen the bolts that hold the panel in snap off from rusted threads when removed. because of the close proximty to the fuel tank, it has to be pulled inorder to drill the bolts out, unless you want to risk drilling a hole in the tank. Also I think in many cases (not saying its the issue here) the high cost of fuel causes people to buy gas places they normally wouldnt to save 2 cents a gallon, which is usually less than a dollar saved on a fill up. Water, and dirt can raise hell with electric fuel pumps.
Whitelightning
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Well, I felt the solenoid at key on and it was clicking. Pulled the fuse and it's good. Pulled the solenoid, checked contacts and put it back. Same click, no fuel pump action. Having her towed to a local dealer that will give me the trade price on the pump and lifetime warranty on parts AND labor for $600. Sounds good to me since just one more replacement would make up the little more cost of having them do it should the pump crap out again. It does have 95K miles on it so I can't complain to much! :-)
Thanks, Kevin
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Something VERY important to remember about GM fuel pumps. The fuel in the tank cools and lubricates the fuel pump and especailly the motor. If you run it low on fuel a lot you will shorten its life and many have found out the hard way. (GM does not tell you about this) In the real world, you really do not want to run it much below a 1/4 tank often. I have a 17 year old suburbam with orginal fuel pump that works fine and I have made it a point to keep tank half full or better all of its life except when it breifs gets low on trip sometimes between fuel fills but it does have a 40 gallon tank and even when I burn 30 or so it still has 10 gallons in it. I know a lot about the motors used in those pumps because my dad was involved with a company that was testing and designing a motor for GM to use in those pumps several years before they did it in production. It was a challange to design a motor that could use gasoline as a lubricatant for its bearings. I know that he provided the motors to GM for first few years but I have no idea who does now. He passed away many years ago and took that knowledge with him. Also TBI pumps tend to last longer than Vortec ones because they operate at a lot lower line pressure and motor do not work as hard or get as warm. (12 to 14PSI vs 60 to 65PSI) ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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This is an old wives tale. The pumps are cooled from the fuel passing through them, not by the fuel surrounding them. That's just the way it is.
wrote:

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Battleax wrote:

What's even worse is that the vehicle that Snoman is referring to has a fuel pump "module". Which retains fuel around the fuel pump even when the fuel level has gone down. As usual, his information is either outdated, or incorrect.
Ian
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genius is wrong!! You will upset his all knowing fan's. He can't possibly be wrong.
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Roy wrote:

I know....I know...! The "Snoboys" have crawled out of the woodwork here lately.
Ian
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What ever makes you feel less insecure Roy.... ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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The return line on my 93 tbi dumps right on the fuel pump motor...in the referenced module.
Even though that fuel has been to the engine compartment and back, wouldn't it be relatively cool compared to the motor? Gasoline does have a positive JT coefficient so the pressure drop across the regulator should provide some temperature drop. And does the engine ever use the entire flow....no recycle? I doubt it.
I can say this....I just replaced the pump last month. It was put in service in May of 1993 in Hot, Texas (136K miles ago) and was run to empty damn near every tank. It also takes me about an hour to drive 8 miles to work...no telling how many hours that pump had on it.
The only thing that saddened me is the way it went out. I fired it up one Saturday, drove to Taco Cabana for some tacos before an 8 a.m. barber shop appointment and when I came out with a full belly, the pump had retired.

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on it wont run? And how sometimes you can take a pencil or something and spin the blades and it will run, untill you shut it back off? same with the fuel pump. although they will usually be at the bottom end of allowed pressure before they go.
Whitelightning
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I have noticed that phenomenon....instead of pencil though, I smacked the fuel tank with a 4x4 trying to jar the pump to spin.
I checked the resistance trough the harness and it was over 60 ohms....which told me it wasn't going to run ever again. The new pump was 1.something ohms on the bench.
I wonder if we could build a database of pump failures versus ohms and crudely extrapolate it to predicting failures.

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That could be possible for some failures, and if it were a solid enough method the OEM's could add that to the computer, then give a warning when it's recomended to replace it.
Nahhh, they would never do it. ;-)
Brian

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Wonder how much the increased resistance is due to corrosion on the connections leading to the pump rather then the actual windings of the motor?

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I think none.
I measured 1.something ohms on the bench and 1.something ohms from the fuse connection on the firewall. So, less than an ohm through the wire, connectors, and ground wire.

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wrote:

No as usual you are quite clueless but you do not seem to care. Go ahead and run those pumps low all the time and burn them out if you like changing them. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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Idiot... whether you like it or not Mr. shiden_kai is right on the money. I think it's hilarious that you refer to what your father did 25 years ago as if things haven't changed since then. Bob
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On Sat, 28 Oct 2006 15:39:44 -0400, "Battleax"

The trouble here is this is quite false and the blind leading the blind. I know how those things operate because over 25 years ago my father reped for a electric servo/motor company that built prototypes for GM testing and GM later used for several years. They had a lot of problems getting motor to last using gasoline as a lube for bearing as I recall him telling me back then. You go ahead and run you pump low if you want. I have never had first pump fail yet in any of mine and I have owned 4 and one for 17 years and counting. If you check around you will find that basically everyone that has shorter pump life on a GM vehicle runs tank low alot. Vortec pumps are less tolerant because they develop more heat due to much higher pressure and motor current. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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