Diff question

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I have an 81 chev 3/4 ton 4x4. It has a 14 bolt rear diff and 10 bolt front. I want the front to be 14 bolt as well... can it be done ?.. did this truck have a 14 bolt front diff ?.. I also was told that this truck had std
gears 2:73 or so. Thanx for any advice..
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I would like the old 1 ton with pins instead of ball joint setup.. LOL I know I am asking to win the lottery ..

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Some 80's 4 tire 1 tons had Dana 60 fronts. About the best you'll find. 79 and older ones had full time four wheel drive, but you can just add locking hubs with no problem.
Al
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thanx.. I may have found one.

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SOme old Doge 1 tons form 70's and 80's had D70's up front. There is also a D50 which is basically a D44 in a D60 housing with heavier axles than a stock 44. Ford used them a lot in F250's especailly with diesels. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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I was not aware I could put dodge and ford on the chev in the front due to the brakes.. I guess once I find one, I'll check how they work.. Which year fords had em., and is it hard to adapt the ford/dodge to the chev.. they look the same but the brake system setup is what I am asking about
wrote:

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wrote:

You may have to change baking plates for different brakes but a brake is a brake more of this and could be made to work. On the D50's in fords it was in two flavors. Some modules starting in the 80's used a TTB (swing axle) version of D50 or a striaght/solid one while newer ones from about 95 or so on used a straight axle only. Yuu will find them under F250's with diesels and some F250 and 350's with gas motors. Dod ge used to put some pretty stout front axles under their 4x4 trucks until the came out with new body style in 95 and went back to that bastard hubless bearing design. Thy used a axle disconnect on them untill 2003 when they change over to AAM axles up front and this new axle had no disconnect or hubs (typical Dodge) so front diff and driveshaft was always turning even in 2wd. You want to stay away from these 95 to 02 axles because the notch they cut in the axle tube makes them weaker and more prone to bend especailly on 1/2 ton models (I have seen more than one Dodge 1/2 ton of that era with a lift and bigger tires with a bend front axle with tires slanted in at top let me tell you) THe 2003 axle on is made by AAM and uses the same ring and pinion as the GM 9.25 IFS and has a very stout housing and I would place it above a D60 in load capacity too. Proplem is , not axle disconnect or provisions for hubs (Dodge has been doing this off and on since 70's) but there is a aftermarket kit for about 2 grand that fixes this> the same is Dodge could have easily used a different hub design from factory but did not to save a few buck and cost the end user a fortune in extra gas. Figure on a 1 to 2 MPG loss on highway with the front diff always being spun regardless of drive mode selection (no to mention wear and tear on front axle Ujoints that could be avoided. (one reason why I would NEVER buy a Dodge 4x4) They dis the same thing on 1/2 ton 4x4's with a modified AAM 8.0 inch IFS axle meant for the rear of a Small SUV and again with no axle disconnect. This is getting to be kinda a Dodge trademark. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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to
year
Gas Dodge's of the early 90's use a hub-less HD Dana 44. Diesels use the Dana 60 with locking hubs, but look at the placement of the center. Keep it simple, use a Chevy axle. Your Chevy's has a decent 10 bolt front axle. It's as good as a Dana 50. You are not going to gain much by swapping.
Al
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Not by a long shot. THere is BIG difference in housing strength and axle weight capacity between them. (people tend to forget about the strenght factor of housing itself and wrongly assume it does not matter) The D50 is basically a D60 with D44 gears and bigger than stock 44 axles. THe D50 is rated at about 90% of the input torque capacity of a D60 and about 30 percent more than a 10 bolt. A 10 both to D44 is a better comparision but then there are some HD D44 out there that have a stronger housing thant a stock D44 and they is not such thing as a HD 10 bolt. When you rate a alxe you consider its weight capacity and torque capacity. A 10 bolt and a stock D44 (not HD) are close to even but beyond that the 10 bolt falls behind. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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wrote:

Here we go. What is the front axle in a 3/4 ton 81 Chevy rated at? What is a Dana 50 rated at?
Al
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let the debate set us free.... I would like to know that as well :)
wrote:

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Forget the debate. Decide how you're going to handle the gear ratios. You need to have the same ratio in both ends. Most Dana 60 fronts are going to have 4.10 gears, and they are a real pain to change. Did you find out what ratio is in the rear?
Al
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They are not that hard with right tools and beside if you are running a lift and big tires even 4.10 is not enough and taller certainly is not but there are those thaat think a 4.10 is a cure all never mind that a 4.10 with 36's is like a 3.42 with 30's which is not a good combo either. Proper gear ratios make the different between a marginal 4x4 and a solid running one and reduces overall drive line stress too. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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wrote:

to
what
I'm starting to doubt your sanity. Dana 44, 50, 60, and all above are a real pain in the butt to set up. Obviously you have no clue.
Al
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No I think you do not. If you use a spreader on the case to relieve preloaded on carrier bearings it is not that tuff to do and remove or install carrier but if you are a hammer mechanic it can be challanging if you do not have your ducks in a row but doable. Those that have fits with them fight it and do not do it right. When you setup a D44/50/60, you first do it with zero preload (and speader relaxed or removed) and get depth and backlash correct THEN you add about 020 preload depending on factory spec ( or about 010 to each side) and recheck it. If you try to set pattern with preolad all the time you will beat yourself up big time. You can work on it without a spreader (I have) but be prepared for carrier to kinda jump out when you overcome preload prying it out (have a soft cushoin landing pad for it or extra hands. Once out do it as above and then set preload amount divided between both sides amd positon carrier in place with bearing cups tilted in in back a bit to start them in there with preload and then "tap them in with a brass hammer from side to side or a regular hammer with a piece of oak between hammer on bearing then recheck pattern. Do not assume that because I do not give a blow by blow that i have not been there and done that. ALso I have been known to chuck pinions in a lathe and polish shafts intill bearings can be tapped on eaiser (you do not want it a loose fit) and then to remove them to change shims you take pinion and kinda slam in down a bit on a block of oak threaded end first and the bearing will fall off after a time or two. ALso if you heat bearing up to about 250 to 300 in oil and then use gloves to can put them on a lot easier if you do it quickly on a stock shaft but you will still need a puleer to get them of. There is a LOT more tricks to working with rear axles which I used to do a lot but do not do it much anymore. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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wrote:

real
I was right! You DON'T have a clue. Better hit the shop manuals and rethink this. I'll wait for your apology:)
Al
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Big Al wrote:

Hey, he "polishes" the pinion shaft until the bearing will slide on real easy! That's got to tell anyone who repairs diffs properly where the Snoman is coming from! Wow!
Ian
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He seems to run in cycles. Gotta be a full moon.
Roy
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Makes it a lot easier to change the pinion shim, don't you know! Press, what press:)
Obviously, he's never been inside a Dana either. Will never forget my first one. Some Dodge dealer left the case spreader on for a few weeks while they waited for parts. They were unwilling to try to set it up so they brought it to my shop. They loved to farm out the dogs.
Al
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Makes you wonder what he mangles when it's time to change the shims under the differential side bearings...
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