Front Window Replacement: Bad Idea?

At over 100k, my front windshield is definately showing it's age: pits, scratches, even a little crack. Nighttime visibility is definately down.
My first reaction is to just get it replaced. Sounds like OTR truckers do it
all the time - some drivers even carry spare glass with them.
OTOH, I recently heard from somebody that once a windshield is replaced the probablity of leaks rises a lot.
Opinions? Experiences?
----------------------- PeteCresswell
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Depends on the installer. I only had one leak on me. I really wouldn't worry about it. The best company I found is Safelite.
Rita
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If it makes it hard to see then you need to replace it for safety sake. Just call around and get the best price. Most of the time they will come out and do it at your house but I personally prefer to go to their shop as I think they work a little slower. I had the one done on my 91 suburban at my house ($125) and it started to leak after about 6 mo just went around the seal with a little black silicon and no leaks since. So if you can afford it get it changed and if it starts to leak call them out to fix it. The big trucks have removable windshield that are held in with metal trim that screws on and off. The windshield on normal PU or all cars are glued in so it really is a little more complicated but if they clean out all of the old sealant and do a good job it will not leak.
good luck, mark
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I've replaced my own before (found a $25 antenna in a boneyard) and just made sure that the seal and glass were clean, it never leaked (and the same day I put it in, there was a flash flood in my neighborhood that ended up with 4' deep water)....the '73-'87 chevys were easy....
Jeremy

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Quality of the job is also dependent on quality of the glass used. My body shop used PPG glass in my truck the first time I wrecked it. This glass is usually a quality piece of glass. The first one they got wasn't so good, it fit in the frame fine but after 2 attempts at setting the glass they just couldn't get it to seal, so they ordered a new piece and tried again, getting a good seal. I guess the glass wasn't formed just right, but with a quality glass company the chances aren't bad at getting a good piece on the first try, and a good installer will catch it before it hits the adhesive.
Check with your insurance company, make sure you don't have glass coverage before paying for it totally out of pocket. If there's a crack, they'll call a glass shop and send them to replace it wherever you want it done, at home, where the vehicle can sit for 24 hours untouched, is preferred by most places that do this.
On Tue, 16 Sep 2003 21:20:23 -0400, "rock_doctor"

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Pete,
My '95 spent the majority of its life in Arkansas and was sand-blasted when I got it. One of the first things I did before I started driving it was had the windshield replaced.
1) take it to their shop and have it done there. They have the tools and EVERYTHING they need, including an extra set of professional hands if needed. Your windshield is installed from the factory with urethane and the installer will be using heated urethane to reinstall it (government regulated process).
2) the bead of urethane they use is triangular shape and should be 3/4"-1" high when they run the bead. There is no way it can leak if the guy knows what he's doing. Get someone that has been doing auto glass (not glass in buildings) for a living for a long time. No one with less than 10 years behind them will ever touch anything I own.
3) many new products are on the market for repairing your windshield (cracks, pits, etc.). I'd look into this before you have someone cut out (that's right, cut out) your original windshield.
4) use PPG glass if you do have it changed out.
Older vehicles it wasn't the case, but the windshield is part of the structural integrity of your truck on the newer ones, so it's not something to play around with.
Snowman

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