Fuseable link size

I added a battery isolator to my 2000 S10 and have the alternator connected straight to the isolator and the old line from the battery to the alternator goes to the Battery 1 terminal of the isolator. To be safe I
want to put a fuseable link in the line from the alternator but don't know the value of the stock fusable link. Shop manual lists it as S153 but I don't find a value, anyone know it?
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connected
When adding a fusible link to an add on devise I've just gone down one wire gauge is size from the devise wiring. I don't know if this the correct practice but it's worked for me in the past.
Brian
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el Diablo wrote:

This is replacing the stock one between the alternator and battery. Since I put the isolator in the middle I moved the stock one between the isolator and battery so I want to get a matching one to bo back between the alternator and isolator and between the isolator and second battery, then get carry a spare or two of the same size. So I'm not adding for another device I'm just duplicating the stock one for the other side of the isolator therefore want the same size.
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I
Why not just leave put the one you have between the alternator and isolator ?
you don't really need two more
it's only in there to protect the alternator in case of a dead short in the wiring out of the alternator
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TranSurgeon wrote:

So I don't have to clip the wire at the battery connection. Even though I don't plan on trading vehicles often I still like to make any changes easily reverseable. Plus if something were to go wrong in the isolator I would prefer fuses on each side of it to protect the rest of the components.
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isolator
then
another
I'm not following your reasoning here
if yu already have 'put the original between the isolator and the battery', then you have already broken the wire at the battery connection
My advice would be this: find your alternator rating (100 amp for example)
go to an electrical supply house and get a bakelite fuse block for an NON-100 cartridge fuse (2 of them)
put them between the isolator and battery if you MUST have a fuse there
NON-100's are about 3-4 bucks each, the holder will be about 5 each
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TranSurgeon wrote:

I didn't cut any wires is what I was intending on saying, I simply unbolted the single wire on the back of the alternator and moved it to the B1 on the terminal on the isolator. Then I ran another wire from the alternator to the isolator. So I still have a fusable link in the main battery side but no protection in the secondary battery side. I simply wanted to duplicate the same setup on the secondary battery side so I don't have to spare another/different size. I could use a fuse but I've found that the links are more "slow blow" than fuses which is why they keep them for that main line like that so it would be the last thing to blow.
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in
though
I
connection
unbolted
the
Then use a FRN-100 fuse..........it's a 'dual element' type
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TranSurgeon wrote:

Well now that my medication has wore off I remember that fusable links are in wire size not A ratings so I just need to look at the stock wire ;)
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