Gas vs Diesel

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mac davis wrote:


Its best to have it installed BEFORE you need it, instead of pushing the pettal to the floor and thinking "gee, maybe I should ahve gotten one after all" Also, reduces brake wear, so you dont that to replace those gaint brake pads as often. Your right, I was reading up on the Jakes last night, and the big rig Jake brakes are at teh valves, thus causing that burbling sound, the exhaust brake is pretty much silent. The Banks Exhaust brake is all computer controlled, so you dont even know its there really, except for the improved engine braking. It also helps speed up the warm up in cold climates.
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wrote:

nope... a "Jake" or Jacobs engine brake works by actuating the exhaust valve just before TDC on the power stroke... this allows the engine to absorb as much energy as possible by compressing the air, then releasing it through the exhaust. this prevents the piston from regaining energy from the compressed air in the non firing cylinder. a compression brake can absorb upwards of 400HP. this is what the big boys use and gives you the staccatto rumble.
an exhaust brake works by building exhaust pressure that the engine must fight against. this gives "compression braking" comperable to a gas engine of equivelent size. (gas engines's intake throttle blades performs more or less the same function when closed). when actuated, these just kind of hiss.
check out www.jakebrake.com
-Bret
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wrote:

I've been doing a lot of research on the jake, (exhaust brake), in the dodge group and the RV forum.. Seems that the folks that have them love them.. but most don't have them because they have the automatic..
A couple of folks in the dodge group said that they use them when their not towing, just for more control and that gasser feel of compression when you let up on the throttle..
It would seem to me that since they cause back pressure after the turbo to slow the engine that long use could tear up the engine, but I guess it doesn't because Dodge warranties them on a stick..
Mac
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mac davis wrote:

I know its sales material, but it IS informative, http://www.bankspower.com/why_add_exhaust_brake.cfm
http://www.bankspower.com/FAQs.cfm
From what Banks says, it does not hurt the engine at all.
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wrote:

Nope.. but Dodges concern (I can't find any info on Ford) is the transmission.. From what I can understand with my limited knowledge of automatics is that when the computer applies the jake, the torque converter has to lock up, or it could somehow damage the tranny... Dodge has a few pages talking about reworking the computer module or something in the automatic to make this happen.. hopefully for the 05 1/2 model year..
Mac
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mac davis wrote:

Banks has a system to take care of this issue. Banks mentions that Dodge and Ford need their lockup kit with the exhaust brake on the automatics, but Chevy trucks with the Alison do not need the kit since the Alison has the "tow/haul" mode that takes care of it.
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wrote:

That's good news in general, but for me, it's still an issue of Dodge & Ford not warranting it yet..
It's scary enough shopping for $35,000+ pickups without voiding the warranty on the tranny... especially with the Dodge, where I'm already a little worried about tranny problems with the CTD..
Mac
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