Honey Coloured Oil in Diesel

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"Jonathan Race" wrote:


dozen
What is wrong with Shell Rotella SYN 5w40 and is about $13/gallon at a Walmart? Amsoil has alway been way overpriced for what it offers.
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Nothing is wrong with it except that the two Wal-Marts close to me don't carry it in the 15w-40 I use.
Cheers - Jonathan

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"" wrote: > Hello SnoMan and Jonathan, > > How much longer a break-in period do diesels need than > gassers? I've heard people say 100,000 miles and the diesel > is "only breaking in" but, realistically, how long? Also, > are the break-in procedures different? > > Regards, > Franko >
> wrote: > > > > > >> The break-in period must also be considered -- it is so > > >> critical for maintaining the tight tolerances. I > remember > > >> breaking-in my brother-in-law's '86 5.7L Suburban > > >following > > >> the manual to the letter (speeding up, slowing down, > not > > >> exceeding a certain speed, etc.). That 'burb hardly > used > > >> any oil between oil changes and it was honey-colored as > well > > >> as it came out. > > > > > >But they're talking about diesels. > > > > Diesel need to break in too and pushing them too hard to > soon can > > result in rings not seating properly. > > > > -- > > Posted using the http://www.autoforumz.com interface, at > author's request > > Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet > standards > > Topic URL: > http://www.autoforumz.com/Chevrolet-Honey-Coloured-Oil-Diesel-ftopict127270.html > > Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd). Report > abuse: http://www.autoforumz.com/eform.php?pb1967
It depends on how you define broken in. A regular breakin takes 3000 to 5000 miles give or take but as the engine continues to run it wears a bit more with time and loosens up a bit more tolerance wise and they may not make there best MPG until they get 50,000 miles or more on them so this is were you here the long break in. I refer to breakin period with a new engine as the time it takes for everything to seat properly and for engine to beable to make max power without any lose of engine life becuase it is pushed too hard too soon and for me it is the first period I quoted with the first 1000 miles or so been the most critical.
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Last winter I drove a highway plough (SW Ontario). It was an unusually heavy winter and we had lots of deep, wet, heavy snow all winter long. The truck was a Sterling with a Mercedes power plant. I've never driven anything like it. I've driven Internationals, Louisvilles, Macks, (not "ever kinda rig what's ever bin made" but close) and I was amazed by the smooth power this rig delivered. I'm a Mercedes fan now.
The only probs we had were sensors and electronics, and there were only a couple of those. The tranny was a little unforgiving, but I don't need much forgiveness.
-JD
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Jonathan Race wrote:

    GM did small diesels in the late 70's and 80's. FWD cars with a 4.3 Deisel. RWD full side cars with a 5.7 olds '350' deisel (uses a hevy duty version of the olds 350 crank). There were 1.8 Deisel Chevettes, and very few, but out there 2.2 Deisel S-10's.
    VW sold Diesel Rabbits and Rabbit Veriations. Toyota offered a Diesel in the Tercel for a year (I beleave 1980), and has offered Diesel pick ups on and off for a while. Some of those U-haul Toyota Dual Rear Wheel Trucks are Deisel.
    Toyota Still sells Deisel Forklifts in the US, as well as Gasoline, propain, and Battery powered forklifts. Charles
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On Mon, 04 Jul 2005 20:53:32 GMT, Charles Bendig

Has Toyota ever offered a diesel in the Tacoma line of pickups for the US market?
--
Elbert Clarke
elbert.clarke@**adelphia.net
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"Jonathan Race" wrote:

You dont even need a Duramax in larger trucks :) I also never really understood the giant gas (or diesel) guzzler US cars, even though I have a 96 GMC Yukon (5.7 V-8 ). I also own a 2001 Renault Mascott (see pic). Believe it or not, this truck has a V-4 2.8 DCi engine, which produces 140HP. And that is enough to haul 5500 kg of weight. I was towing my GMC with it a few days ago (cuz the driveshaft broke) and it had absolutely no problem with it. Top speed is 130Km/h (about 95Mph) and the fuel consumption is about 12l/100km (22Mpg) and can get down to about 8l/100 on long routes, the GMC takes twice as much. Btw - these 2.8 DCi motors should last at least 350thous. miles, provided that they are well taken care of.
http://fusion.wz.cz/other/P1010003.jpg
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Hi !
> I also own a 2001 Renault Mascott (see pic). Believe it or not, this > truck has a V-4 2.8 DCi engine, which produces 140HP. And that is > enough to haul 5500 kg of weight. I was towing my GMC with it a few > days ago (cuz the driveshaft broke) and it had absolutely no problem > with it. Top speed is 130Km/h (about 95Mph) and the fuel consumption > is about 12l/100km (22Mpg) and can get down to about 8l/100 on long > routes, the GMC takes twice as much. Btw - these 2.8 DCi motors should last at least 350thous. miles, > provided that they are well taken care of.
I live and work in France, and at work I use several renault truck with the 2L8 engine.( Who is a slant4 and not a V4 )This engine is a Iveco product and is used in several cars and trucks : renault master/mascott , Iveco dailly , Santana ps-10, bremach etc ...
I agree your fuel consumption 12L/100 >> 19,6 MPG not 22 with a plane road and a low towing weight .
but sorry I don't agree your mileage capacity ! If you want go to 350000 miles with a renault/iveco engine, you will have to change at least 4 turbos, 3 cylinders head gasket , 2 cylinders head, 12 rods and cylinders ! :-)) and I don't talk about the gear box, the rearend etc .....
Mine have 140kmiles and we change 1 turbo , 2 fuel pump, 2 cylinders head gasket.... and I'm not a crasy driver .. All others 2L8 we use at work have the same problems .
To obtain a long life you need a low engine speed : at 95 mph your 2L8 should turn at more than 3600 rpm ! for the same speed (for example ) a Suburban V8 5L7 turn only at 1800 rpm ..
European cars are disposable toys, please don't compare them with the greats Us ones..
David .
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"david" wrote:

2L8
THis is debatable because if you lug a engine too much relative to its load you will not extend its life. Also there is no suburban anywhere that is going to do 95 mph at 1800 RPM with a 5.7 in it.
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"" wrote: > Hi ! > > > I also own a 2001 Renault Mascott (see pic). Believe it or > not, this > > truck has a V-4 2.8 DCi engine, which produces 140HP. And > that is > > enough to haul 5500 kg of weight. I was towing my GMC with > it a few > > days ago (cuz the driveshaft broke) and it had absolutely > no problem > > with it. Top speed is 130Km/h (about 95Mph) and the fuel > consumption > > is about 12l/100km (22Mpg) and can get down to about 8l/100 > on long > > routes, the GMC takes twice as much. Btw - these 2.8 DCi > motors > should last at least 350thous. miles, > > provided that they are well taken care of. > > > I live and work in France, and at work I use several renault > truck with > the 2L8 engine.( Who is a slant4 and not a V4 )This engine is > a Iveco > product and is used in several cars and trucks : renault > master/mascott > , Iveco dailly , Santana ps-10, bremach etc ... > > I agree your fuel consumption 12L/100 >> 19,6 MPG not 22 with > a plane > road and a low towing weight . > > but sorry I don't agree your mileage capacity ! > If you want go to 350000 miles with a renault/iveco engine, > you will > have to change at least 4 turbos, 3 cylinders head gasket , 2 > cylinders > head, 12 rods and cylinders ! :-)) > and I don't talk about the gear box, the rearend etc ..... > > Mine have 140kmiles and we change 1 turbo , 2 fuel pump, 2 > cylinders > head gasket.... and I'm not a crasy driver .. > All others 2L8 we use at work have the same problems . > > > To obtain a long life you need a low engine speed : at 95 mph > your 2L8 > should turn at more than 3600 rpm ! for the same speed (for > example ) a > Suburban V8 5L7 turn only at 1800 rpm .. > > European cars are disposable toys, please don't compare them > with the > greats Us ones.. > > > David .
David: 95Mph (cca 130kmh) in the 2L8 doesnt turn at 3600. As you probably know, its a six speed manual, and I think that 130 should be at about 3000. Also, the 5.7L (atleast in the Yukon) probably wont be so low at 130. Id guess 2200-2500. But I can check on both if needed.
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Hi

My renault is a 5 speed manual, that's why I'm talking about 3600. For the 5L7 I'm surprised of the speed that you said , but I don't often have luck to drive one of them so I must be mistaken with another european usual speed ( 110 kmh ?? )
If you can check and let let me know this may be interest to me.
snoman : Ok , said a engine must turn slowly to extend life isn't enough.. what I mean is that a engine build to turn and be used at a slow speed should have a longer life that a fastly one .. Look the big diesel in trucks, boat, electric generating unit ....... There are big, turn slowly and have very big torque.
I think that a big engine who turn at 1000 rpm is better than a small one who turn at 3000 rpm for the same power ..
have a good day .
david
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I agree, but the other part of the equation in extending engine life is consistency of speed and load. The larger, slower engines also last longer because they aren't subjected to stop-and-go use with wide fluctuations in RPM and load. A motor like that will perform better and last longer if it is kept as a constant speed and constant load for most of it's life. I'm a fan of higher torque (as compared to higher horsepower) because a motor with more torque needs a narrower range of RPM's to move the load than one with lower torque, and avoiding wide fluctuations in RPM is prefereble in motors that move heavy loads.
Cheers - Jonathan

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"david" wrote:

Maybe a diesel but I have seen some gas engines that cruise at 3000 RPM and more at speed big and small go 200K miles with no problems. It is the load vs RPM that drive a engine to e early grave not it RPM if its in a design RPM range. If is easier on a engine for it to work at 3000 RPM than to be forced to lug at 2000 RPM or less under that same HP requirements.
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Its all apples and oranges for the most part. You run an engine the way it was designed to be run and it lasts. Big diesels like Cats, Cummins, Detroit, etc are slow engines because the weight of the recipricating parts demand that they be slow engines. More than one idiot driver while I was in the service thought he/she (yeah had two females do it) would be slick and turn the governers up on their trucks, only to have bearings fail and more than one even toss a rod through the block, the gold star goes to the idiot who turned it up 1000 rpm on a 10 ton powered by a v-8 mack, put a piston through the cylinder head at 2,600 rpm according to the tachograph. governed rpm was supposed to 1,900 rpm. These are big bore long stroke engines. The rods are heavy, and the pistons weigh a ton. The bore and stroke in a Detroit Series 60 11ltr is 5.12 X 5.47 inches, The series 55 12 ltr has a 5.04 X 6.10 . You start getting into the stationary, marine, or train engines and you get 2 or 4ltrs per cylinder in 8V, 12V, or 16V configs. The Cat C15 is 5.4 X 6.75 inches, 928 cubic inches inline 6 cylinder (15.2ltrs) 550 hp at 2100 rpm, 1850 lb-ft of torque at 1200 rpm. Drop down the the C11 (11.1 ltr) and the numbers drop to 5.12 X 5.51, hp down to 370, and torque 1450. My old Kenworth T-600 with a cummins NT-14 435e could keep up with anything bob tail, and embarrased more than a few guys in cars off the line, and never turned more than 2,100 rpm.
compare this to the duramax 7800 7.8 ltr inline 6 engine with a bore and stroke of 4.53 X 4.92 200 hp, 520 lb ft of torque at 2,200 rpm, or the duramax 6.6 V-8 with 4.05 X 3.89 inches 310 hp at 3,500 rpm and 605 at 1,600 rpm. The rpms have gone up, the bore and stroke have gotten smaller, the parts weigh a lot less. Get to the 8100 V-8 4.25 X 4.37inches and our rpms are over 4,000 for hp, and over 3,000 rpm for peak torque..
course the Duramax weighs about 1/3 what a cummins NT-14 435E, or Cat C11, or Detroit Series 60 11 ltr weigh. The fact is heavy parts dont handle high rpm and stay together, coupled with heavy parts store a lot of energy when they are moving. There is a reason those old exposed flywheel engines had such large flywheels compared to their displacement. You take a light duty truck engine, gear it to keep the rpm down and try pulling a load, it wont get out of its own weigh, and wont last very long ether. Same token gear it too high and you'll burn the engine up. Ever notice how the old inline 6 engines always had a larger diameter and heavier fly wheel than the small block V-8s did?
Whitelightning
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