How Looooow Can You Go? AKA Boneheaded Oil Change...

Been really preoccupied with work lately.... finally thought to check the oil and it wasn't even showing on the dipstick.
Added a whole quart and that got it up to two holes low.
Anybody know how much was in the system before I added that quart.
I'm thinking maybe this has validated my decision to use Mobil-1....assuming that stuff would hold up better and there'd be less damage under those circumstances.
--
PeteCresswell

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Not sure which engine you have, but it probably holds 5 quarts when full. Unless you have a diesel, at which time, I want to say it's 12 quarts.
Enjoy Bill
91 Audi 200TQ 96 Chevy K1500

oil
Mobil-1....assuming
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RE/

5 quarts...VORTEC 5.7....but I don't know how much two holes on the dipstick represent.
--
PeteCresswell

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my 5.7 takes 6L with a filter change as well.

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My understanding of the "holes", "hash" marks, and lines is as follows. 1. The lines indicate a point at which the oil is either too high or too low. 2. The holes are a way to differentiate between oil in the pan and oil in the tube. When the dipstick is immersed in the oil in the pan, surface tension will ensure that the holes will be filled with oil (but only those holes that are immersed in oil). The holes that are not immersed in oil will not be filled with oil. 3. The hash marks provide a contrasting background on which to read the exact oil level.
But to answer your question, your oil was 1 quart low, because you added one quart and the level was between the "too high" and "too low" marks.
Your statement should have been: "I added a whole quart and that got it up to two holes below "too full".
A funny side note here. I asked my son to check the oil in his mother's Buick before we went on a driving lesson. He came back to me 15 min later saying that the oil was 3 quarts low so he went ahead and added them. It was actually 3 holes below too full and not actually low (though I probably would have added a half quart). Not only that he started it to warm up while he was getting ready. I ran out to the car and you could HEAR it gurgling while sitting there idling. After draining the excess oil out, we sat down and had a training session on checking and adding oil.
KenG (Pete Cresswell) wrote:

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You can go clear to dry! No others here won't agree (LOL)... Ever see those prolong commercials where they race cars w/o the oil plugs in the pans? And if it had even 1 qt that would probably be enough to lub it. A friend is still running an 80 Camaro that has been run dry numerous times. The 8 years that I drove it I really miss-treated it - only adding oil when the idiot light flashed on breaking. I had figured on replacing the 267 V8 with a 350 whenever it died (even had an engine ready - but it never died and I got better wheels). The friend has been treating it much better (even painted it with rustoleum-brush-job) and it's fine. Of coarse smaller engines and sometimes even large ones will stick a ring or blow completely when run try. But if it isn't blowing smoke or fowling sparkplugs I don't think you hurt anything by running low. If you had hurt it you'd have seen a red-light, felt loss of power, seen smoke after. Of coarse that would be the time to do your own head-machining like the old-timers did. Elliott (slumming again - LOL - hi NG!)

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