Imporving Conductivity Of Battery Terminals?

I've got the kind that screw in from the side.
Ground side, the threads of the screw look nice and clean/shiny.
Hot side they're dull, red/brownish in the grooves.
Couple times I've had starting problems that were cured by wiggling and/or tightening the hot side.
Seems like the screw is ripe for cleaning but I can't think of what to do for the female side except put some kind of electro-conductive goop on the male side threads.
Is there a stock solution for this?
Or is there even a problem?
--
PeteCresswell

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They must be cleaned well. remove the cables, scrape or brush all bad spots until clean, then wash the terminals and cables with baking soda mixed with a little water to make a paste. then rinse with plain water and reconnect all cables(do not overtighten side terminal types as they have a tendancy to pull loose from the battery. This is a normal old fashioned way of cleaning and works well. old john

for
male side

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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

u forgot to mention to take your dipstick out and Smear some engine oil on the terminals Before attaching the Cable.. ( Stops OXIDATION )

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for
male side

Conductivity is not achieved through the threaded screws. It is the cable end and the connection point on the battery that must be clean and shiny. You can buy a side post brush or just scrape them with your pocket knife, like I do. If, after cleaning, you still have the same problem, corrosion may have gotten under the cable insulation, in which case, a new cable is in order. H
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(Following by Lee Swanger from 62-65-dieselpage-com) Use two nuts and a 1" or 1-1/4" long bolt; strip the insulation off the flat connector at the end of the battery cable; use two wrenches:
1. Thread first nut all the way onto the bolt, not tight 2. Slip the flat connector onto the bolt 3. Thread second nut all the way onto the bolt, not tight (flat connector now between the two nuts) 4. Thread the bolt "assembly" into the battery side terminal, slightly tight but not too much or you'll strip the new threads (use wrench on bolt's head) 5. Back off the second nut until it is snug against the battery side terminal, slightly tight (use one wrench on second nut and another wrench on bolt head to keep the bolt from turning) 6. Back off the first nut until it and the flat connector is tight against the second nut (this you can tighten more; again, use one wrench on first nut and other wrench on bolt head)
Don't use grease or non-silicone lubricants on the threads because you want maximum metal-to-metal contact for conduction. After you have assembled the battery cable to the battery, you can coat the connector/cable with the red spray-on battery protector available at most auto stores.
*******
If the bolt is loose in the battery terminal to begin with (stripped threads in the battery), you could use a 7/16" bolt to replace the OEM 3/8" bolt. Make sure your 7/16" bolt has the same TPI (threads per inch) so as not to cross-thread the battery side post. Chase a new thread into the battery side terminal with the 7/16" bolt.
Good luck. Franko...

for
male side

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Throw away the lead washer in the terminal. Replace it with a harder material such as brass, a brass reducer cut to length works well. Replace the bolt with on of the proper length, or cut one to length.
No grease or Oil, these will actually cause corrosion. Petroleum jelly or the spray on protectant are a better option.
My rate is $110/hr, email me for payment options. ;D
Cheers

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