improving mileage

Hey guys,
Recently our gas prices have been on the rise. We are now paying a whopping $1.129 Canadian for a liter of gas
I think I got the conversions right:
----------------------------------------------------------------------- 1.129 Canada Dollars = 0.941459 USD
$1.129/liter cdn = $4.27/gallon cdn = $4.01 /gallon us ----------------------------------------------------------------------
What I want to know is... What are the best ways to significantly improve mileage on a vehicle without having to spend too much money.
The vehicle in question is: 93 silverado /w 350 V8 ----------------------------------------------------- users trucks from this group listed below ----------------------------------------------------- http://users.eastlink.ca/~mikemcneil/index.htm
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My reccomendation would be to sell that vehicle for as much as you can get any buy a moped or motorcycle. I live in the US, in Indiana and right now our gas has topped out at $3.70 in our area.
If all americans could go two days without ever buying fuel I think that maybe the gas companies would be hurt a bit

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On Tue, 16 Aug 2005 14:07:38 -0500, "Adam Frazier"

Glad I don't live there, we're about $1 per gallon less than you, hovering around $2.659/gallon.

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i have found that i can greatly increase my 5.7 liter 98 burban gas mileage by going soft on the accelerator pedal and driving the speed limit. Dont accelerate on hills to keep speed up to 55 or 65 mph. Doing this I can get 20 mpg. Several weeks ago I did a 110 mile trip and got 22 mpg. Lots of folks pissed at me for driving the limit but too bad for them. Drive as though you dont have brakes also helps. Blasting down freeway I drop to 16-18 mpg.
I wish I knew what the highway mph sweet spot on this burban is. I am suspecting 50-55 mpg

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I am laughing so hard I almost peed in my pants. So we don't buy gas for two days. That just means that the two days gas will be purchased over the other five days in the week.
Maybe you should have suggested not driving for two days and getting around either via an alternative method. You know like walking, bicycle, or heaven forbid public transportation.
Double Tap
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Hello Michael,
I was following a couple of threads where after adding a little acetone to gasoline (thoroughly mixed) in carburetor-equipped vehicles, they see anywhere from 10% to upwards of 25% improvement in fuel consumption. Apparently does not work on fuel-injected vehicles (thus nixing diesel engines, too, of which we have three vehicles). They had a chemical engineer post a response that what they were experiencing was not possible -- was promptly laughed off the forum (theory versus reality).
The only gas engines I have are the leaf blower (great for starting charcoal BBQs), power washer, lawn mower and snow blower, so am unable to "scientifically" verify/substantiate claims.
Interesting...
Regards, Franko
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Franko wrote:

    NEVER EVER Put Acetone in your Fuel Tank. Not only will it eat at any plastic or rubber parts, It can turn your fuel in to a black ooze that will clog everything.
    NEVER Put Non-Fuel Items in a Fuel Tank. Especially when told about it on line! Charles
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Hello Charles,
If the plastic and rubber (especially) issues are resolved (quite readily) and you are left with acetone in gasoline (10oz per 10 gallons, or something like that) which does end up giving significant fuel economy, that would be an additional answer to the original poster's question. Intriguing how the efficiency gains are only seen in non-injected engines.
Regards, Franko
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Franko wrote:

    So what your trying to say, with out having a clue on how internail combution engines work is: Acetone promates better fuel atomization? Because other then that, a Carburator and a TBI Injection System work damn near the same.
    Electronic Fuel Injected engines have a more sensitive Knock sensor, and the computer will retard timing more severe then Computer Controlled Carburated engines. Which is why you don't run a Gear Drive Timing set with EFI, it sets off faulse knock and causes spark retard. Which is all acetone is doing. Cauing spark retard Via Knock.
    Acetone Combusts like Methonial. It requires HIGH compression then the average street engine has (8.5:1 up to 9.5:1). Methonial (Racing Alcohol Fuel) Need between 18:1 up to 25:1 Compression Ratios to ignite properly.
    Your little secrect should go back in to the trash bin with the other hair brained ideas idiots think up.
    If I Really Want Efficency, Ill remove a A/C compressior clutch, and build a centerfuge style blower behind it. Lose the A/C from my Trucks, and when needing 100% Volumetric efficancy, turn the HVAC controlls to A/C. Charles
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Hey, numb-nuts,
The original poster asked a question and I posted an answer based on observations by a number of Chevy truckers in other forums who, with either purely carbureted or fuel-injected engines, experienced significant fuel efficiency gains with the former when mixing acetone with gasoline. It's no secret and has been around for quite some time.
The observations of significant gains with the carburetor-equipped and little, if any, with the injector-equipped engines imply that acetone is doing "something" to the combustion process to the point that it makes the carbureted engines more efficient than their injected counterparts. That's what I find intriguing. I was hoping that others who have tried same could share their experiences -- obviously, you haven't, but thank you for sharing your thoughts and opinions. It's hair-brained ideas like this that provide us with progress/improvements (e.g., whose hair-brained idea was it to replace sulphuric acid with freon in refrigerators?)
BTW, a straight carburetor doesn't work anywhere near the same as a throttle-body injection because the latter has no venturis to restrict air flow, i.e., they allow much more air to flow than the former. Carburetors have venturis which create a pressure delta that draws gasoline from the bowl through the jets, etc., etc., etc. Fuel in TBI, on the other hand, is injected under pressure eliminating the need for restricting venturis, etc., etc., etc.
And if I want REAL efficiency in MY TRUCK, I'd swap the gasser for a diesel... oh, sorry, I've already done that... a couple of times (replace the engine-driven fan with electric fans, install larger diameter exhausts, install post-turbo water-injection rather than intercooler, use larger diameter belt accessory pulleys, install higher pressure taller tyres, lower the suspension at least 2" and rake the truck's profile).
Franko
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