now im confused

do i buy a oiless compressor for an impact wrench or a oil-lube compressor? and just to make sure do i ONLY have to buy one hose that will fit for it or are the fittings on the ends of the hose for every tool and part? does
it matter if its oiless or not? please exuse my probably a blonde moment again but were does the oil go anyway?WHAT THE HEC IS IT FOR?? lol!THANX AGAIN.
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compressor?
I presently have a 5hp Crapsman Oiless with a 20 gal. tank. It works ok, but it is VERY noisy and sometimes when it is cold (below freezing) it doesn't want to start. Next time, I'll go gack to an oiled crankcase type. P.S. Did I mention that oiless compressors are VERY noisy??? H
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I'll second that. I have the 6.5HP/30 gallon and it is REALLY noisy, but it kicks some ass performance-wise so I just pop in some ear plugs and have at it.
Doc

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Either or will work for any air tool. The important thing to look at is the size of the tank and the CFM rating at 90psi, which is the regular working pressure for most air tools. The hose will work for all air tools. You will need to get quick disconnect fittings for EACH air tool you buy so it can hook up to the hose. There are many different types and styles, so I'd advise you just get the compressor, hose and tools and let him get the fittings.
Oiled compressors are quieter but require oil changes. Oilless require NO maintenance but are noisy. Give and take.
I would advise againt the small 8 gallon compressor you are looking at as the CFM rating stinks. That little thing won't run a die grinder, air drill or any air sanding tools for more than 20 seconds before it craps out and has to catch up again.
You want at LEAST a 20 gallon tank and at LEAST 6.4 CFM @ 90psi to use die grinders, air drills, sanders, etc.
http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&fromAuto=YES&bidsite=CRAFT&pid 916731000
Follow the link above. This is the smallest you'll want to get him.
Doc

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On Sun, 05 Dec 2004 14:51:11 -0500, "blazerchic"
oil-less compressors are fine for low duty cycle use, like DIY mechanics or finish nailers. they simply have a shorter life and are much, much nosier. we used to have a bostich oilless at work, it worked fine, but was super loud and we did wear it out.
oil lubed ones have a much longer life and are much quieter, the downside is that you do have to change the oil in it once and a while. you'll also find them in much higher CFM ratings (like the 12.3 CFM Curtis or the 13 CFM Dayton compressors we have at work)

you'll want a male and female disconnect for your air hose and a male connector for each of your tools. sometimes the tools come with a 1/4" industrial interchange, sometimes with nothing.
does

only in general longevity and duty cycle.
please exuse my probably a blonde moment

an oiled compressor has oil in the crank case, just like a car engine, an oiless uses ball/ roller bearings and ceramic seals, to eliminate the need for oil.
-Bret
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