outer end of exhaust manifold

95 S-10 4x4 4.3. This past winter, when it was pretty cold, I happened to have the hood up one day with my truck running and noticed the exhaust vapor was visible, all around the joint between the end of the
exhaust manifold and the pipe. It made the familiar leaking noise. Is this still a donut gasket replacement like it was in the old days? A repair shop told me it wasn't, and that it was more of a major deal and would require a manifold to head gasket too, and quite possibley extraction of broken studs. I think they are full of it.
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95 S-10 4x4 4.3. This past winter, when it was pretty cold, I happened to have the hood up one day with my truck running and noticed the exhaust vapor was visible, all around the joint between the end of the exhaust manifold and the pipe. It made the familiar leaking noise. Is this still a donut gasket replacement like it was in the old days? A repair shop told me it wasn't, and that it was more of a major deal and would require a manifold to head gasket too, and quite possibley extraction of broken studs. I think they are full of it.
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No donut, the end of the manifold is cast as a rounded area and the pipe forms to it. Two ways to repair it. Replace the manifold. Or remove the pipe and clean the casting real well and then braze any bad spots, sand smooth and replace the pipe.
--
Steve Williams

"D.Murphy" < snipped-for-privacy@noplace.noc> wrote in message
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Well, thanks for the input, but you are wrong in this case. I just got back from getting this fixed. The first place I took it to, [a reputed reputable shop], gave me this written estimate, after I told them what was wrong with it:
Exhaust manifold remove and replace - $234.69 Mill Exhaust manifold - 45.00 Environmental - 2.29 Shop Supplies - 6.18 Parts - 35.27 Labor - 281.98 Tax - 19.04
For a very grand total of $624.55
This price was contingent on the stipulation it could be more if they broke old bolts trying to remove them, [which is common they said], and therefore had yet more parts costs and labor.
Actual cost to get this job done at a muffler and exhaust place with very little wait time was:
Parts: $13.54 donut gasket Labor: $27.00 Tax: $2.43 Total: $42.97
I waited an hour for the thing to cool down, and had lunch acrossed the street. It took a total of a half an hour to fix max. And I've got today's dated receipt to prove it, as well as the printed prior mentioned estimate.
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On 6/21/05 at 18:39 hours "D. Murphy' purpoted:.......... "Well, thanks for the input, but you are wrong in this case. I just got back from getting this fixed."
I bet you are the biggest prick that you know........
--
Mad-Dog
'79 Chevy K-10
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Bet it fails in less than a year. Sounds like the muffler shop did a Q&D repair by using a sleeved donut stuck in the end of the pipe. With no shoulder to support it, it will break down easily. But hey it was CHEAP.
--
Steve Williams
Near Cooperstown, New York
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I'd bet you are the biggest coward piece of shit you know.
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No donut, the end of the manifold is cast as a rounded area and the pipe forms to it. Two ways to repair it. Replace the manifold. Or remove the pipe and clean the casting real well and then braze any bad spots, sand smooth and replace the pipe.
--
Steve Williams

"D.Murphy" < snipped-for-privacy@noplace.noc> wrote in message
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If you can separate the pipe from the manifold than you can see if its just a doughnut. But you can check before you get it apart to see what it looks like too.
I would bet dollars to doughnuts that they are full of it and trying to fleece you.
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99% of mechanics give the rest a bad name.
I didn't jive with me that the exhaust would have gotten so complicated for your model that it was anything buy a asbestos doughnut. I am glad that you got it fixed. I hope you weren't kicking yourself after seeing how easy it was. And thinking you could have done it yourself.
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D.Murphy wrote:

He's right, there are plenty of manifolds designed that way. Whether or not your's is designed that way, I have no way of knowing. But rest assured that not all exhaust manifolds have removeable exhaust "donuts". Some of the newer GM vehicles use a donut seal on one side of the y-pipe and a flat flange joint on the other side with a small circular seal.
Ian
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and
ain't
fuck
Wrong book? GM Factory service manual is wrong? Maremont Exhaust systems master catalog is Wrong? Walker Exhaust components catalog is wrong?
That design has and still is in use on a LOT of different makes. Open the hood on any 2.8 equipped S series or most V-6 equipped sedans. Take a look at the crossover pipe 99% of the front drive autos, they use the same system. Have since 1982 when the Citation was introduced with the 2.8. Even the 4 cylinder had the same type of manifold. Two or three bolt clamp holding the belled pipe onto a machined area on the iron manifold. No donut or any other gasket on them. They also used it on the main pipe connection off the manifold. YES they flex and shift around, the iron wears on the steel tubing and forms a gas tight seal. The zinc from the galvanizing and the carbon from the exhaust gases provides enough lube for it to work. Take a look at a converter some time, guess how half of those attach to the intermediate pipe? Same way, belled pipe flange and ball socket on the converter. Don't have anything in the shop at present that is apart to take pictures of.
No grease zerk on there.

-
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While that may be all fine and dandy, this design is not the case with regard to my 4.3v6 '95 S10 PU, OR my "early," 2.8v6 '88 S-10. I have receipts that show what I am saying is true, and I can make scans of them very easily. It would cost you a lot to prove me the liar you've tried to make me however. Shoot me an offer and I'll consider it.
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It doesn't seem like the flame war. Does it matter?
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