Programming New Remote

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Greetings,
I recently lost my #2 remote for my 2004 Chevy 2500HD and will be purchasing a replacement on eBay soon. I still have my #1 remote. My question is can I
program the new remote myself without any special (expensive) tools or do I need to go to the dealer to have it done?
Any sage words of wisdom would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks - Jonathan
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Good luck, I asked the same thing and nothing yet for my 05 Colorado. Dealer wants 75.00 Total rip off.

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Greetings,
I found some instructions for a 2003 Silverado on the net but am unsure if they will work. If you have a 2005 Colorado and need your remote programmed, the dealer should do it under warranty - just tell them the remote stopped working and you don't know why. Remember to give them both remotes however, because both need to be programmed at the same time.
We purchased a Pontiac Vibe for my wife recently that is still under warranty and the former owner only had one remote. I bought a new one off eBay and went to the dealer with both. They programmed both for free no questions asked.
Cheers - Jonathan

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We bought a replacement at the dealer for about $50, programming was included free. Many dealers have decided to be competitive, they do alignments and oil change for same price as discount chains. I couldn't beat the price on remote after I paid shipping from an on-line source.
Jonathan wrote:

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Jonathan wrote:

Jonathan, did you manage to get your remote programmed with those instructions? If not, let me know, and I'll copy and paste the 2004 instructions for you. 2004 full size trucks can be programmed manually.
Ian
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Ian,
I haven't yet received the new remote - it'll be here in a few days. If it's not too much trouble please post the instructions anyway as I'd like to keep them on hand. Not only that, but I trust you as a source.
Cheers - Jonathan

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Jonathan wrote:

Thanks for the vote of confidence....here you go:
Method 1 - No Tools Required, Program All Transmitters
Important All transmitters which are to be recognized by the PDM must be programmed in a single programming sequence. When using this program method, all previously programmed transmitters will be erased upon the receipt of the programming signal from the first transmitter.
The order in which the transmitters are programmed will determine its numbering position within the PDM memory. The first transmitter programmed will be transmitter #1, and the second transmitter programmed will be transmitter #2. The number stamped on the transmitter case is for reference only; #2 can be programmed as #1, or vice versa. Additional unnumbered transmitters are also available.
1.. Close all the vehicle doors. 2.. Insert the ignition key into the ignition lock cylinder. 3.. Press and hold the door unlock switch. 4.. While holding the door lock switch in the unlock position, cycle the ignition ON, OFF, ON, OFF. 5.. Release the door unlock switch. The doors will lock and unlock to confirm the program mode. 6.. Press and hold the LOCK button and the UNLOCK button simultaneously on one transmitter. After a delay of approximately 15 seconds, the doors will lock and unlock to confirm the programming of that transmitter. 7.. Repeat the previous step to program up to 4 transmitters. 8.. Turn the ignition switch to the RUN position in order to exit the keyless entry transmitter programming mode. 9.. Operate the transmitter functions in order to verify correct system operation.
Ian
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Kevin wrote:

Nothing yet?
I already replied to you that it can only be done at the dealer.
As to the price, yes, he is ripping you off. So call around and find another dealer.

--
I am 3 of 10. Prepare to be assimilated.



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Doesn't any of you know that you can buy those key fabs at Autozone for a lot less than the dealer and they will do the same thing for you? And they can program them too.

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That is what the sign on the front door at Autozone promises. There is also a website where new remote fobs and programming can be done. It was a bit pricey, about $60-70, at this website but IS possible, and not only the dealer can do it.
Does anyone know what Autozone charges? We are missing one of our remotes, and it is a PITA not to have it available, but not worth $70 either.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.nix wrote:

<sigh>
We were talking about programming, not the best place to buy a remote.
(I paid $22 on eBay, dealer wanted > $100)
As to programming on a website - for the vehicle in question, cannot be done. Period.
If AutoZone can do it great, I did not know that, but the fact remains you cannot do it yourself and must pay someone who has the right equipment to do it. Specific HARDWARE is required to program this remote.
--
I am 3 of 10. Prepare to be assimilated.



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I bought a remote for our 99 jimmy and I programmed it, all I did was put in the batteries and got in the truck and pressed the unlock and lock buttons and held them untill the truck beeped, dont know how this will work for anyone else.

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wrote:

I did the same for my 2000 S-10. However, the procedures change from model to model and year to year as electronics vary and are improved upon through the course of a design. I now have a 2006 Grand Prix and must take the car to the dealer if a new remote must be programmed. I verified this by looking in the GM Service Info system, the only procedure listed involves using a GM scan tool.

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Mike Levy wrote:

Thats why I donnot buy a newer Vehicle.. Buying one LOCKS u into Going to the DEALER .. I'll Stick with my 89 s10.
When I want to fix a Vehicle , I DONNOT want to Have to DEPEND on a DEALER , Especially A GM DEALER .. What happens if ALL of GM does as DELPHIA is doing But CANNOT be SAVED from Bankruptcy...The Consumer is Goingto Be stuck with Vehicles that CANNOT be fixed, Because all the DEALERS will be gone ALSO !
NO DEALER= No Getting a NEW Chipped KEY MADE!

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Greetings,
First off, it would be a cold day for everyone in this country if a company as large a GM went down - if a company that large went south this country would have more problems across the board than just where to get our cars fixed. There is no way that any consumer who purchases a new vehicle these days isn't going to be reliant to some extent on the manufacturer no matter what make or model. Not everyone wants to drive around in a clunker that they have to keep running with a coat hanger and duct tape. Also, what are you giving up for the perceived ability to be able to fix your '89 S10? Fuel economy, lower emissions, power and safety come to mind.
Sorry but Delphi is no longer a part of GM and hasn't been for a while. In fact, one reason why they filed for bankruptcy is because they got saddled with the pay structure that was negotiated when GM was their parent. Delphi is also an extremely large company as well so don't expect to see them shuttering all of their operations anytime soon either.
As for your chipped key, I've gotten spares made at independent locksmiths before with no problem. It's just a matter of finding a place that has the machine to read the codes and the blanks to receive the programming - not everyone has them but not impossible to find either. And when it comes to service, I must be the one and only SOB in the entire country that has consistently gotten great service from every Chevy dealer I've been to. I've been driving GM products continually since 1988 and have never had a problem with any of my dealers' service departments. I can't tell you if it's the same at the corporate level because frankly I've never had to contact GM in order to settle any issue that a dealer I've used has been unable or unwilling to handle. Others may not be that lucky, but from my perspective I can't possibly see where their service could be any better.
Cheers - Jonathan

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Jonathan wrote:

Purchased it NEW in NOV 1988 ( $8,246.98 )
28 MPG
No payments
4.3 is powerful enough for me 225,000 miles
Been plowing Snow with it since 1995.
Same Automatic Tranny As when I bought it in 1988 ( Same Fluid)
Not Rusted out
This Model Truck HAS NEVER been in a RECALL
Low Insurance RATE !

I've had Chevy's since 1958
and have never had a

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no one wrote: <snip of majority of quoted text>

    Not True. A local (Dayton Ohio) area locksmith I deal with has the "Chip" keys. That "Chip" is nothing more then a simple resistor.
    The keys have to have the value read. Then matched to the proper blank with the correct resistor value.
    For some items I perfer to buy them OEM from a GM dealer then aftermarket stuff. Lock cylinders & key switches are one of those items. Although a Good locksmith can Code your locks to your exsisting code, as well as cut you a key basied on the code on the cylinder.
    As for Remote Programing. Anyone with the proper tools can do it. Yet very few Non-Dealer shops invest in the equpiment to do it. Give it 5 to 8 years and they will. Charles
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I know a former friend of mine used to run his own shop out of his garage, he was an ASE Ford Mechanic, he used to be able to program key fabs. He showed me once on his handheld.

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Ive bought the GM resistor keys in Houston at several lockshops. No problem. There are other keys with more secure systems, and I dont know how difficult they are to replace.
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Well, they say they can. The fob and programming was about $70. You order, give them the required information, and you get your remote in the mail.
The individual cannot do it over a website, true. The company offering the service provides everything.
Now, I would venture to say that the electronics behind the fobs is not so very complicated, and it probably wouldn't be any hill for a climber to BECOME ABLE to do it. I'll have to look into this (but I dont care enough one way or the other to try it myself.)
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