Question about improving A/C and engine cooling...

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wrote:


I agree with that, just use it as aux cooling fan that does not replace primary one. ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
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Is the fan shroud intact, and is it the correct one for the vehicle/engine combo? Major over looked item often times.
If the fan clutch is more than 5 years old, figure on replacing it. The standard rule is a fan clutch loses 100 rpm for every 10,000 miles on the vehicle measured at 2000 rpm.. You want a heavy duty thermal fan clutch. I don't have the correct numbers in front of me but the correct one's housing will be about 10-12 inches in diameter, about 3 inches thick, finned aluminum housing with square shoulders, with a bi-metal coil spring in the center facing the front of the vehicle. Stay away from the ones that look like stamped steel on the face with a flat bimetal strip instead a coil, they don't work worth a darn. Get the factory heavy duty seven blade fan, one blade will be slightly off set. Make sure there is no debris between ac condenser and radiator. Its amazing how much junk can collect there, especially if its been sitting out side for awhile around oak or pine trees. Flex fans are fine for the drag strip, not worth a damn any where else. If your vehicle uses a serpentine belt, the correct fan was used on just about every late 80's to mid 90's S-10 Blazer with a 4.3 ltr engine. It sounds like a bloody turbo prop plane engine when the clutch kicks in, but you can watch the temp drop like a rock.
Whitelightning
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On Fri, 23 Jun 2006 21:20:35 GMT, "Whitelightning"

On what logic is this based on??? The silicone in the hub never "wears out" and if it does not leak out it can function fine. The only thing that ages is the bimettal coil that controls its operation (it is quite "normal for it to age too sometimes and it raise engagement tempature when it does) It is easily adjusted if need be as shown in link in this thread. By this "logic" I should throw away the clutch fan on my 89 burb since it is 17 years old even though it still work great after a tweaked it a fe years ago. ALso the one on my 2000 K3500 is going to be 7 years old so and it still works great too but I guess I should throw it away too. ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
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Sno you are right, with the engine hot and the spring heated up from running, the fan should turn maybe 1 or 2 blades when spun by hand.
wrote:

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wrote:

Yes and if it spins freely inspect it and look for signs of leakage. If there is none you can try tweaking it. If it is woobly, the bearing in it are bad and it needs replacement for sure. ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
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I don't feel like arguing with you sno, this discussion was hashed out about a year or so ago and I posted links to numerous sources, from ASE's web site, to manufacturers web sites, to repair sites all saying the same thing. But here are a few new ones
Larry Carley, who writes many articles for Counterman , Automotive Rebuilder/Engine Builder. numerous articles for ASE mag, as well as MotorMagazine and Import Car and a host of others takes it even further and says they lose about 200 rpm per year http://www.aa1car.com/library/2003/cm60328.htm is one such article. This one will tell you about Larry http://www.aa1car.com/larrypage/larrycarley_photos.htm
Brian Manley, thinks along the same lines as stated in this article http://www.asashop.org/autoinc/aug2003/techtotech.cfm his credentials Brian Manley is a vocational automotive instructor for the Cherry Creek school district in Aurora, Colo. He is an ASE triple master certified technician and a member of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) board of trustees
Both also write for Underhood Service
Federal Mogul lists the same advice in their articles on head gasket failure such as at http://www.federal-mogul.com/cda/content/front/0,2194,2442_7359_7519,00.html
Whitelightning
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On Sat, 24 Jun 2006 02:55:38 GMT, "Whitelightning"

Because you do not want to admitt you are wrong. Like of course the OEM is going to say it is bad because this way they can sell you another one duh! Never take advise from them on this. Silicone does not break down or wear out. it is VERY stabile (that is why the use it in clutch along with its cohesive properties) and if the bearings are good and the fluid does not leak out the worst the can happen to them is the bimetal coil may need readjustment as it ages. There are no wearing contact surfaces in the clutch as the silicones shearing properties between two surfaces provide the power transfer. You should stick to topics that you really understand rather than basing comments on a web article by OEM's. Just think of the impact on sales and service work if John Q Public knew they most of the time there is no need to replace them and at lmost a simple adjustment is needed most of the time. I have actually taken one apart once to see what makes it tick, have you? ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
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wrote:

My fan clutch works very well, and it's coming up to 500,000km.
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wrote:

Not one single link I gave is/was provided by any OEM, ether in this thread, or the ones a year or so ago. And yes I have taken them apart, its a bad habit of mine wanting to take things apart to see how they work and what makes them tick.
Whitelightning
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wrote:

How many cores in your new rad? Should be 4-core for that pumishment. All the flushes, fans, louvers, thermostats and prayers to Mecca won't help a small rad get rid of all that heat. - Regards Gordie
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On Fri, 23 Jun 2006 21:56:50 -0400, The Nolalu Barn Owl <&#103&#111&#114&#100&#105&#101&#64&#110&#111&#108&#97&#108&#117&#46&#111&#110&#46&#99&#97> wrote:

It is likely 2 core but a good clean 3 core with a proper cooling fan will more than suffice here. A 4 core is not really needed untill you get into big block teritory. Proper cooling fan operation is very important. ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
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I don't run the A/C lately because my truck is running a little hotter than I'd like to see. I popped in a 180 thermostat the other day and topped it off, but it's still running hotter than I'd prefer. Gonna try a 160 'stat. I know that running the A/C will only cause it to run hotter, and the stand-still traffic keeps it from doing much good anyway.
If the truck is running hot there is a cause. Dirty radiator. Hardwater scale in the engine. Extra lean fuel mix. Something. Typically a low temp stat will not help.
When I was a kid and couldn't afford a shop to do my work, I'ld pressure flush my radiator and my engine with an adaptor that would connect the unit up to both a water hose and an air hose. I'ld run water through until it ran clear, then hit it with about 100 pounds of air all at once to blow the water out. Then repeat until water runs clear immediately after blowing out. For the engine you have to remove the stat to use the pressureflush adaptor to do the same thing.
The other thing I would find was that the radiator fins would plug up with bugs, weeds, mud and other road debris over time. For this I would have to pull the radiator and work the bugs out from the back side slowly with water and air.
Of course hot tanking a radiator does both (to the radiator). I discovered for me it was cheaper to have a radiator shop do that while I spent my time making money.
As to maybe lean running conditions... well you have been doing a lot of work to it. I you may have installed a free flowing exhaust, and maybe a more open air cleaner. You still running the stock carb and jets?
Another running hot possibility of course is a bad fan clutch. I don't recall how its supposed to feel when you grab the fan and give it a spin, but I recall that an experienced mechanic could tell pretty quick.
Also, since you have been working on this thing. Is there a good fan shroud installed? It makes a big difference in making sure the fan draws all its air through the radiator. Another thing we have done on some heavy hauling trucks is add a flap between the radiator and the bottom of the body to funnel/force more air through the radiator when moving.
I'm not so sure about adding vents to the engine compartment, but hey I don't know everything. In fact I don't know much compared to most of these guys.
P.S. Getting your engine to cool properly is not the same as getting it to run cold. Your fuel economy will drop off if you actually get it to run colder
--
Bob La Londe
Fishing Arizona & The Colorado River
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Thanks to everyone for the suggestions.
After closer inspection over the course of a few days, I realized my initial assessment of the situation was incorrect.
At idle, it's fine... When I accelerate or maintain speed for a while it heats up--worse depending on the outside temperature. When I come to a stop in traffic, the heat can't dissipate quickly enough, so it either stays hot, or gets hotter depending on driving conditions (accelerating briefly to move forward with traffic then stopping again only adds heat, without allowing enough time to cool back off).
So...I'm thinking the flow is restricted, which would cause more of a problem at higher speeds, which makes sense...
I still plan on installing an electric, auxilary cooling fan as well as bypassing the heater core as was suggested.
In the meantime, I got a couple of bottles of Prestone radiator flushing solution. I'm going to use one and see how well it works out. Since I have the cam swap coming in the near future, which will require removal of the radiator for clearance anyway, I'll have it properly cleaned by a radiator shop then.
Thanks,
~jp
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wrote:

This tends to suggest a plugged up radiator and flushing will not likely fix it. You will likely need to have it rodded out to removed radiator salts that may be blocking the core internally as they are tuff to get out otherwise. Prestone used to make a flush that you remove them but it has long be removed from market because it was not environment or user freindly. ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
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What about a quick use of CLR? I know the makers of CLR recommend against it, but I read some threads where folks stated that they'd used it with success.
~jp
SnoMan wrote:

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wrote:

CLR didn't do as well as the ads say it will for us. Seems a sucker is born every minute. Couldn't even remove a rust stain after soaking for hours. - Regards Gordie
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On Wed, 28 Jun 2006 20:37:00 -0400, The Nolalu Barn Owl <&#103&#111&#114&#100&#105&#101&#64&#110&#111&#108&#97&#108&#117&#46&#111&#110&#46&#99&#97> wrote:

You could remve and flush radiaotr clean and them lay it down and fill it up with vinegat as it ismidly acidic but ti will not damage core. :et it set over niight (it will dissolve lime and scal and rust scale to. Diet pepsi (phosfer acid) will eat rust scale too. You do not want to use regular pepsi because sugar may gum it up a bit. ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
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In requards to your a/c issue in your K-5, I purchased a commercial grade clear vinyl shower curtain from target. The grommets lined up with the bolts on my 83 K-5. No issues with rear view mirror and much improved comfort. George
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LOL... I'd thought of doing this same thing as a temporary fix until I can get the half-cab kit ordered and installed. Once that happens, I'll just end up with a shorter-than-shortbed pickup.
Thanks,
~jp
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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SnoMan wrote:

Huh?
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