Re: just had my fuel pump gp out today in OK City



If the pump is in the tank, it is worth the money. It is a pain the the butt to do that job on the garage floor.

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I had the fuel pump go away in my 2000 Yukon XL, cost 837.00 and some change. Fortunately I had purchased an extended warranty and it only cost me 130.00, Whew, good call.

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they're actually not that hard - there's usually just a couple of bolts holding the straps in place (and on a relatively new vehicle, they won't be seized by rust yet), tank lowers down, wires and hoses practically unplug from the tank, hammer and brass drift remove the lock ring, and there ya go.....the trick is to have the pump go out when the tank is empty.. ;-)
Jeremy

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because a empty tank causes the pump to stop working from heat build up. Fuel cools the pump, the more fuel the cooler your pump will operate and the longer the pump will last. When your fuel tank is a quarter full, consider that it is empty, otherwise you will be replacing a lot of fuel pumps. Also when a tank is near empty the fuel pump is picking up things that are better left in the tank and on the side wall of a tank that is low on fuel builds scale. Threat your pump like it was your heart if you like your truck. If you don't like your truck then never put more than a gallon of fuel in it at a time.
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That goes without saying.
I had a friend once with an older Olds '88 that wouldn't run for long when he had less than half a tank. It'd do just fine with a full tank, but when that pump got above the fuel level, it'd overheat and stop working. Took him about 3 months to put 2 and 2 together and figure out that it only happened when the tank was less than half full......

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RE/

Can somebody explain why the fuel pump is so often located in the tank?
To save a buck?
Some other reason? ----------------------- PeteCresswell
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the two biggest reasons are 1. it's a well protected spot and 2 it's easier to push than suck.
-Bret

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There you go. Sounds like Jeremy will change that pump for 20 bucks. I'd give him a call. ;)

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That's about all I'd charge for labor - but the drive time to OK city from Austin would be another story... ;-)
Jeremy

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Just watch the hoses when taking them off...I have another brand of vehicle (will not post it - this is a GM NG), and in order to take off the fuel lines from the tank, it requires a special tool that slides inside of the coupling to release it.
The tool only runs 3-4 dollars at one of the local auto parts stores.
Once you get the fuel lines off, it's a piece of cake (recently swapped out for a new tank on the "other" vehicle).
Good luck! Don

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Yes, typical for the Yukons and "Burbs" of 1997 nor sure of other years! Have it R & R'ed from an authorized AC/ Delco shop. I had mine go out within 6 months of it's replacement of the original and AC/Delco shop warranted it, under the assumption its a Delco fuel pump! As in past post advise, don't let the fuel tank get below 1/4, it cause the cheesy pumps to heat up and burn out the crappy little electric motors!

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I did my 88 S-10 myself. I got up in the morning and went to a parts store when they opened, bought the pump, went home and dropped the tank and replaced it, went inside and showered and then drove to work and made it there before lunch time. You can loosen the bolts for the mounts enough that the tank will drop down a little and then reach in and loosen all the hose clamps.

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Me wrote:

My guess is you might have a physical advantage over me. My big hands/arms/belly are a hindrance to the process in this case. The tank came out pretty well for me, getting the lock ring off the top was an adventure. I should also add that in my change I also cleaned all bolts and nuts and messed with my spare tire. Nonetheless, it was a really long and patience trying process.
Big Chris
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but, you did it by yourself and that's a rarity in today's "I deserve help" world congratulations
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Are you from OKC or were you just passing through.
Don Manning

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