SIlverado Battery Cable failed

Hey all,
I went to fire up my 2000 ext cab Silverado, 5.3L Z71 on Saturday and all the dash lights blinked and the starter would not turn over. Upon
inspection of the battery, I wiggled the cables very lightly (thinking they may have come loose) and the Positive cable fell off in my hand with the side mounted battery post still connected. After many hours of screwing with it, I had the truck towed home. I could not get the battery terminal off the cable. I then cuth the cable at the connector and replaced with a $1.39 AZ universal side mount connector. I got most of the strands into the connector, but there are 4 or 5 that are loose. Is this fix permanent or just a band aid? Should I fork out the $60+ for a new battery cable, or is this good enough?
Also, I jumped the truck and started driving home with the battery cable disconnected. The truck died at 40mph about 2 miles later. My NAPA contact said the computer will shut down to minimize damage since the circuit is not closed. Does this make any sense? My '78 will run forever with no battery as long as the alternator belt doesn't break.
Thanks again,
Derek
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
new vehicles will not run long if at all with a connection to the battery. This is normal for newer vehicles in general.
You should be ok with your battery cable repair.
On 29 Sep 2003 11:10:17 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@socal.rr.com (derek) wrote:

--
Elbert Clarke
elbert.clarke**@us.army.mil
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
follow on...... will not run long if at all without a connection to the battery. Low or dead battery and you'll have the same problem....
On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 01:20:52 -0500, Elbert Clarke

--
Elbert Clarke
elbert.clarke**@us.army.mil
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
TY Elbert. Seems strange to me that is will not run with no battery. Shouldn't the alternator generate enough voltage/current to sustain the power draw of the vehicle with every accessory on and then some? Maybe there is some sort of damage protection that kicks in and prevents the vehicle from running. Either way, all seems to be good now.
Thanks again.
Derek

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The alternator produces AC (alternating current) and the computer is designed to operate on DC (direct current). So feeding AC to a computer (or any piece of electronic) will generally fry it. I am surprised that it ran at all on just the alternator only. If the truck still runs consider yourself to have dodged a bullet. I have seen people have problems where their car/truck would die on the side of the road or the dashboard (in a ford truck) would go screwy. In each case it turned out the alternator had a bad rectifier bridge and was feeding pure AC to the truck. The rectifier bridge tries to convert the AC to rectified DC or a clipped (positive only) square wave, if you are E & M friendly. So in rectified DC you still have some of the AC characteristics but not to the extent that the electronics will choke if the battery has the capacity to smooth out the power. If you remove the battery then you are feeding the computer the dirty rectified DC. In all electronics ( i.e. receiver, computer, TV so on) if you were to open the case you will see a transformer (to reduce voltage) and some huge capacitors (to clean the current to a relatively pure DC) and small capacitors (high and low pass filters) to clean any stray RF that may be in the house power. The big capacitors will add power (like a battery) to smooth out the variations in the DC. So in your case the computer shut itself down to protect itself from power it can not tolerate...
mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wow three copies... sorry about that...
mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
.. Re: SIlverado Battery Cable failed Group: alt.autos.4x4.chevy-trucks Date: Tue, Sep 30, 2003, 10:34pm (CDT+1) From: rock snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.nospm.com (rock_doctor) wow three copies... sorry about that... mark ~~~~~
attributed it to a studdering condition.....
you are forgiven
scrib abell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The alternator produces AC (alternating current) and the computer is designed to operate on DC (direct current). So feeding AC to a computer (or any piece of electronic) will generally fry it. I am surprised that it ran at all on just the alternator only. If the truck still runs consider yourself to have dodged a bullet. I have seen people have problems where their car/truck would die on the side of the road or the dashboard (in a ford truck) would go screwy. In each case it turned out the alternator had a bad rectifier bridge and was feeding pure AC to the truck. The rectifier bridge tries to convert the AC to rectified DC or a clipped (positive only) square wave, if you are E & M friendly. So in rectified DC you still have some of the AC characteristics but not to the extent that the electronics will choke if the battery has the capacity to smooth out the power. If you remove the battery then you are feeding the computer the dirty rectified DC. In all electronics ( i.e. receiver, computer, TV so on) if you were to open the case you will see a transformer (to reduce voltage) and some huge capacitors (to clean the current to a relatively pure DC) and small capacitors (high and low pass filters) to clean any stray RF that may be in the house power. The big capacitors will add power (like a battery) to smooth out the variations in the DC. So in your case the computer shut itself down to protect itself from power it can not tolerate...
mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The alternator produces AC (alternating current) and the computer is designed to operate on DC (direct current). So feeding AC to a computer (or any piece of electronic) will generally fry it. I am surprised that it ran at all on just the alternator only. If the truck still runs consider yourself to have dodged a bullet. I have seen people have problems where their car/truck would die on the side of the road or the dashboard (in a ford truck) would go screwy. In each case it turned out the alternator had a bad rectifier bridge and was feeding pure AC to the truck. The rectifier bridge tries to convert the AC to rectified DC or a clipped (positive only) square wave, if you are E & M friendly. So in rectified DC you still have some of the AC characteristics but not to the extent that the electronics will choke if the battery has the capacity to smooth out the power. If you remove the battery then you are feeding the computer the dirty rectified DC. In all electronics ( i.e. receiver, computer, TV so on) if you were to open the case you will see a transformer (to reduce voltage) and some huge capacitors (to clean the current to a relatively pure DC) and small capacitors (high and low pass filters) to clean any stray RF that may be in the house power. The big capacitors will add power (like a battery) to smooth out the variations in the DC. So in your case the computer shut itself down to protect itself from power it can not tolerate...
mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
the alternator 'produces' AC, but it is rectified by the diodes into DC before reaching the output terminal
the battery, however, acts as a huge capacitor to filter out any spikes on the output
anyone who runs a modern vehicle with the battery disconnected has no reason to bitch when things stop working.............

(or
ran
had
rectifier
only)
you
DC.
open
in
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
alternators generate A/C current which they then convert into D/C
On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 19:07:48 -0400, "rock_doctor"

--
Elbert Clarke
elbert.clarke**@us.army.mil
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
look up the term "reticfer bridge" if I spelled it right.... internal component of GM alternators... I assume part of all "new" style alternators even though various brands may use different names to refer to this part.
On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 19:52:13 -0500, Elbert Clarke

--
Elbert Clarke
elbert.clarke**@us.army.mil
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
if the battery is taken out of the loop then you've got a problem with current flow. the bottom line is that no (new vehicles) cannot run any distance at all or for some even start with a low or dead battery. Same applies to an alternator not working properly. New cars / trucks require a lot of electrical power to power the ignition system, fuel injection, A/C and all the assessories...
What you experienced is normal... its just part of the game...
On 30 Sep 2003 13:06:26 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@socal.rr.com (derek) wrote:

--
Elbert Clarke
elbert.clarke**@us.army.mil
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yup reckon thats another reason to fix up the beast and keep it for another 20 years.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks all for your help. I am still confused if the alternator rectifies the AC into DC, I cannot believe that the DC output would not have some filter caps for preventing noise/voltage spikes and frying electronic components. Either way, I guess I got lucky as everything still seems to work. Hopefully won't have that problem anymore. Thanks for the info.
Also, Gary, Define "Newer!" OBD1 or just OBD2 or is this a born after date?
Derek

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
the alternator rectifies the AC into DC, but it is not 'pure' DC
no matter, as the battery acts as a huge filter to supress spikes and transients
as far as 'newer': any vehicle with a computer

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Alrighty then. Thanks again for all the info.
Derek

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sounds like the Battery side post is leaking. You should check that. It was common on earlier years, and if you cable was corroded then I would suspect a leak.
Martin

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.