Torsion bar questions

Hi all. I just aquired my first IFS Chevy. I have owned about a zillion '87 and older Chevys, but this '88 is my first truck with IFS. I'm looking to gain about an inch or two of lift in the front. Can I
just tighten up the torsion bar adjusting bolt to accomplish this?? How much lift can you safey gain buy doing this????
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Good question, I would like to know too. Trying to raise a 1500HD about 2" in the front as well.
Stupid guestion: What is IFS (Ind. front suspension?)
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wrote:

it depends on how often you like replacing ball joints.. cranking the torsion bars causes them to wear out pretty fast. you can probably get an inch or so, but you'll need an alignment after.
-Bret
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wrote:

An inch or so is correct on how much you will gain. I don't see the premature ball joint issue though. I can't see why the joint would care what angle it's at. That's why it's a ball. You can't over extend that front end either. The stops on the upper control arm will see to that. Keep in mind that you should do it on an alignment rack. Don't go so far as not being able to correct camber/caster.
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The angle isn't only what kills the joint:
It's the added load, and the extra angle, that the joint wasn't designed to work at constantly. The ball stud will be almost against the ball cup at curb angle, then hit a bump, and the stud hits the cup edge. Leading to premature joint failure.
That's why they make lift kits, to keep the suspension geometry at the factory designed angles.
Refinish King

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That is an understandable point but I still don't see it here. Added load......from what? With only an inch, the ball studs will still not contact the cup edge. No matter what you do with the torsion bars, suspension travel will still not exceed factory design. Put the truck on a lift with the control arms hanging and look for yourself, there is more room in those joints than you think. That's what suspension stops are for. I gained an inch and a half out of the fr of my K3, 60,000 mls ago. I don't have any joint problems.
On Sun, 18 Jul 2004 00:27:32 -0400, "Refinish King"

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Load multiplied:
As the torsion bar is turned up, and the control arm angle changes. If there's that much clearance. I'd go for it!
Good luck!
Refinish King

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mph. When I got to the alignment shop the caster was so far off the computer couldn't even give a reading for the caster. I then backed off the T-Bars (on the alignment rack) until the caster cam into adjustable spec and finished the alignment. By the time all was said and done, I had backed the torsion bars off 3 turns. It now rides like before and the aligment is within spec. I gained about 1/4" with the one net turn that I now have of the bars. If it were me, I'd look at some other method. Doc recommends lowering the rear and even though I hate to lower a 4X4, that's what I think I am going to!
my .02
Derek
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OMG, I can't believe we have so much discrepancy over such a simple issue. I don't to want to appear as an an ass but the explanation for what you experienced is, for no other reason, you went about it completely backwards! You "blindly" crank up the bars to a random level (a guess), then drive it (before an alignment) and are shocked because it handles poorly!
Bottom line. Turn them 2.5 turns (May differ a tad between K1, 2HD or 3 and if you have a 5.7, 6.5/7.4). DRIVE IT, CK your ride hieght both sides. Adj as nec. Probably adj/drive it a couple more times. Don't just bounce it on the rack because it will not be the same as it will after a 1 mls drive...... you will waste a lot of time. CK the alignment and make sure you can compensate (after the knockouts are removed).
That's all there is too it.
On 19 Jul 2004 09:08:16 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@socal.rr.com (derek) wrote:

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FWIW: I cranked my '00 Z-71 2 turns when it was a week old to get it level. 50,000 miles later the Firestone's still looked great and the ride never changed. I never did have it aligned.
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I've been following this thread now for a few days and decided to give it a shot seeing as how it's going in for a FE alignment on Monday anyway. It seemed pretty straightforward and worked out all right although it seems that the front end is a little more twitchy. Rocking the truck from side to side while driving at approximately 20mph felt very different and more pronounced from before and eyeballing the front wheels it looks like the alignment will definitely be needed.
The front end is now only slightly lower than the rear and as I rarely carry a heavy load it should work fine.
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