upper and lower radiator hoses

I've been told by my local Goodyear auto shop that I should have my hoses changed out on my 2000 Silverado to the tune of $300.
As far as I can tell from examining them I see no cracks, damage, etc.
I checked the manual but did not notice a recommended mileage to change them.
I have 120k miles on the truck but do not see any point of changing them until needed. Is there a rule of thumb mileage wise that anyone is aware of?
Thanks guys.
RonT
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Ron Truitt wrote:

1989 s-10 Same Heater hoses and Rad Hoses as that were on it when I bought it in Nov 1988 225,000 miles . I had to Change the Cross over pipe This week so I Changed out the ORIGINAL OXYGEN SENSOR !
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Its a good precaution to change the hoses. Dry cracked rubber is a good sign for replacement. But my upper hose on my 95 isnt dry and cracked and hasnt been changed in 150k. (knock on wood) $300 is another story, are you rich or something?
Cheers

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Hi Ron, While your truck is really not that old in years, you have a 120K on it, so it's seen some use.
Yes, I'd recommend changing them, but not for $300. If you cannot change them yourself, maybe find a friend who will do the job for you, and "grease" him (pay him) rather than your local dealer.
While you're doing them, also change all the heater hoses too, and buy fresh proper coolant.
All your Hose Clamps should be fine, and you probably can re-use them, provided they'll come off without destroying them.
The Bottom Hose Clamps are usually buried on a chevy truck, and mucho trouble, and cuss words to get them off. One needs to be a surgeon to get them. My '97 Tahoe was like this.
The Heater Hoses are no special deal, any auto-zone, pep boys will have what you need. Just remove one section at a time, copy the length with the new heater hose, and install, then go onto the next section till they're all replaced with new.
When I did my Tahoe a couple years ago, I got tired of seeing crusty, dried out Dexcool Coolant accumilating where the quick connect fitting for the heater hose is on the Intake Manifold.
I bought a standard 3/4" straight heater hose intake fitting, installed it with a bit of teflon pipe dope, threw the quick connect fitting, and hoses in the garbage, and never looked back. Been fine ever since with no leakage.
The thing with hoses, is they might look perfectly fine. Problem is, you never know at this point in time with the mileage you have when they'll fail.
Better to get them now, and better to be safe than sorry, than get caught somewhere in the middle of nowhere with a breakdown. Mark
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I think 300 is quite a bit steep to do somthing that you can do in 15 minutes with two hoses and clamps.

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Ron Truitt wrote:

At five years old, they should be just fine. They are trying to make some money off of you. The hoses would cost maybe 30 bucks for both at a parts store and historically, the upper hose will fail long before tha older one when they reach the end of their life cycle as the lower hose should outlast the truck.
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If you have a V6: Upper OEM $76US + Lower OEM $33US + 2 hours labour to flush and replace hoses @ whatever you local rate is + 12L of Dexcool = a very possible $300.

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