92 Integra - Heater Blower stopped NOT resistor!

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"Darren" <Ask for It> wrote in


Why wouldn't a '99 header fit on a '01? They are the same motor,both OBDII,same body. E-mail Greddy and ask them.
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Jim Yanik
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I just got a response from them....."Thanks for your interest in our products. Sorry, but our headers only go up to the 99 models for that application. We do not have plans to make one for the 01 at this time. Thanks for your email."
Weird huh? Is there a brand of header that is comparable to Greddy in quality and price I can use?
Darren

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"Darren" <Ask for It> wrote in

I looked at a JC Whitney Sport Compact catalog,and the DC Headers offerings list a 94-01 Integra GS,RS,LS header,and list one for a 94-99 GSR (stainless $429.95 or ceramic coated $349.95),2 piece headers. 1 piece headers list only for GSR or Type R
Then the Arospeed offerings list headers for 94-01 GS,RS,LS and a 94-99 GSR. (chrome-plated,no stainless.)
The Airmass offerings list 94-00 GSR and 94-00 exc GSR.Ceramic coated.
I still think what fits on a 99 Integra will fit on a 01.
Or you could ask a decent speed shop,they might know.
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Jim Yanik
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I was trying to replace the bulb on my RSX, but I couldn't get the clip back on. Anyone know where there's a diagram or instructions on this?
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Define "clip".
1) The power connector? 2) The round ring with the big hole in the middle?
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TeGGeR

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If your RSX is still under warranty, Acura will replace it for free. It's a miserable job to do yourself.

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I am planning on swapping summer and winter tires on the same set of rims, twice a year. Is it true that it's hard on the tires to do that, and that I can end up with slow leak?
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Sounds like an awful lot of work dismounting, mounting and rebalancing twice a year just to avoid buying a set of steel wheels for the snow tires.
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right out and said:

I bought high performance winter tires. I don't want to run them on crappy rims. Kinda defeats the purpose. I was going to buy an extra set of alloy rims but, for that much money, I got a complete bedroom set instead ;-)
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"High performance" in what sense? Truly good snow tires can never be truly good warm weather/dry road tires.
Bruno wrote:

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came right out and said:

Agreed. But I said winter tires, not snow tires. A good portion of my winter driving occurs on pavement. So I chose a winter tire that had good dry/wet handling, noise levels and comfort, that handled snow pretty well, and that wasn't manufactured by Michelin.
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Nope. If anything, you'll get LESS of a chance of a leak because the bead seal is always fresh. And you'll have better balanced tires, too.
I used to do just that until cheap used rims became commonplace for my car.
It *is* true that the rubber on the tire's edge will develop minor chipping, but I have never seen this cause leakage.
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Hello all,
Looking for some feedback regarding a recent incident with my 87 legend.
Having been left idling with the stereo running, and the headlights on for approximately 45 minutes in approx -10 Celcius weather, the headlights seemed dim from the outside as I approached, and when I got in, the interior lights would not work. When I put the vehicle (Automatic Tranny) into reverse the engine sputtered, and then to my surprise died. To my embarassment this happened while I was shopping for a new car, but fortunately the dealer offered a boost which caused the motor to start promptly and purr like a kitten again. On the drive home everything seemed to be working as normal. When I got home, I shut the car off, waited a few moments, and attempted to restart the car. It started NO PROBLEM. I did notice however that the Idle is a little slower than I thought it should be (according to the tach it seems to be about 500-700 ish RPM, needle about half way up to the 1). Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought these things needed to idle about 800 RPM??
SO, I'm wondering if the seemingly low idle could be creating insufficient charge to maintain the battery while idling??? Other thoughts are toasted alternator, toasted battery, or something of that nature.... Any input, thoughts or advide would be appreciated if it can help prevent this occurance in the future.
Thanks in advance. (sorry 'bout the longish post....) Noland
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wrote:

With headlights (or DRLs) on, and a battery that's how old?

Don't leave it idling for long periods with the headlights on in cold weather unless you're sure of your battery.
The days of ammeters in cars are long past, which is a pity, because an ammeter would have shown you right away that your headlights couldn't find enough current coming from your alternator and were sipping from the battery. Maybe your idle is a little low, maybe your alternator belt was slipping a bit. Was the heater on too?
I think you were just asking too much of the system.
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There are lots of great statistics at the Government CAFE web site. Lots of compiled data on cars going back to 1977 (and some even older.) One interesting trend tracked is the percentage of automobiles with automatic transmissions.
In 1977, 84.1% of all new cars had AT. Under pressure of demands for improved fuel economy and increasing consumer preference for import cars, that number dropped to 75.0% in 1987. Then imports went upscale, ATs became more sophisticated and fuel got cheap. By 2002, 88.5% of new cars had only two pedals and the imminent demise of the manual transmission was widely predicted.
Then something funny happened. There were rumors of rebellion in the ranks and increased reports of drivers demanding control of the gear ratios. In 2003, the percentage of cars sold with automatics dropped precipitously to 82.4%. The CAFE site is now reporting a further drop in 2004 with the lowest percentage of AT's since 1991, 79.6%. That means that the number of cars sold with manual transmissions increased 77% in only two years and a clutch is now found in one of every five new cars.
In terms of sales, this trend actually surpasses the much touted return of rear wheel drive and the movement is broad based. While keeping in mind that the politics of fuel economy can skew the definitions pretty badly, the trend is apparent in domestics, Asian and European imports. All are selling manual transmissions at levels that haven't been seen in a decade. Almost half of all European cars are now shifters, the highest rate since 1988.
Will this be a long lasting trend or a brief flash? It is still too early to tell but it certainly shows that the old MT is going to be harder to kill than it once appeared. The auto companies have now learned that there is a solid base of buyers who prefer to shift for themselves and the increased availability of this option is sure to follow.
http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/rules/cafe/NewPassengerCarFleet.htm
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snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com (Gordon McGrew) wrote:

On the other hand, you can't have hybrid gas/electric with MT. It's kind of a bummer because I like responsiveness of manuals but the milage*power level is falling behind some automatics. Regenerative braking, continuous gear ratios, ultra-lean burn, and cylinder bypassing need to be coordinated with an AT. The decision was much more clear-cut a few years ago when you chose between a peppy 5-speed manual or a sluggish 3-speed automatic. Now cars like the Accord Hybrid make the decision tough.
If we get fuel cells in marketable condition there may not be multiple gears anymore. You'll just have a knob to select how much regenerative braking you want when you take your foot off the throttle. Crank up regenerative braking and you'd have lightning fast response to throttle changes.
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On Thu, 24 Mar 2005 22:05:51 -0800, Kevin McMurtrie

Sure you can. Both the Civic and Insight hybrid models are available with MT. Accord hybrid comes only with AT for now, but you can get an MT on your V6 Accord now so it isn't implausible that the hybrid may get it eventually.

I think that it will be a long time before fuel cell cars are any more than a curiosity.
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shhhhhhh......don't tell Honda, who sells them by the boatload with manual transmissions.....
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wrote:

It's the Toyota system as used in the Prius and Ford Escape that can't have a manual; in fact, it can't have any transmission at all. It has an "electronic cvt" that is really just a pair of motor/generators in a differential arrangement with the gas engine... there is no place to put a transmission in the power train. If it were called a "virtual cvt" it would be less confusing.
Honda's IMA (integrated motor assist) works fine with a manual; Toyotas SHS (synergy hybrid system) could never have one, if only because the driver has no control over whether the engine is even running.
Mike
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Well, I guess it depends on your definition of "transmission", but I'd definitely say they have one! They have a set of planetary gears (which automatic transmissions also use). And yes, as you wrote, motor/generator is used to modify the gear ratio between the ICE and the driveshaft, as well as supply torque.
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