Integra 91 I have a worn ignition switch

The key goes in but doesn't rotate to any position
What should be the normal procedure?
If I replace the lock, I have to replace all other locks
I wonder if I just get a new key from the Acura people , it will last
a few more years since the key and the tumblers must be equally worn?
Can I replace the tumblers myself?
Can I temporarily disable the steering mechanical lock, use a ordinary switch and take the assembly to a locksmith, if I find one that can do the job ?
Please help.
Thanks
John
As my deceased old friend use to say, old things don't last very long.
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First, a look at http://tegger.com/hondafaq/startproblems.html#ignitionswitch is in order.
My guess is it isn't the tumblers that are worn (disclaimer: I am not a locksmith by any stretch of the imagination), especially if this problem has come on rather suddenly rather than over the last couple years. When I took my daughter's old Toyota to a locksmith because she was having trouble unlocking the driver's door, he told me the problem is normally that the key has worn. Duplicates have a double dose of the problem most of the time because they are imperfect copies of an already worn key. He said if I brought the passenger's lock cylinder he could make a key that would work (the car didn't last that long, but that's another story involving a thrown rod).
In your case, I expect you use the remote to lock and unlock the car. If the locksmith's advice translates to this, you probably have some wear on the ignition switch tumblers and more on the key. But I'm guessing the problem could be outside the cylinder - steering wheel lock, electrical switch, something like that. I think you can get the mechanism apart enough to determine what is causing the problem.
Mike
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<snip>
Replace the key with a new one FIRST. Often these problems are simply due to a worn key, not a worn lock cylinder.
If you still have the original key with the 4-digit number on it, the dealer can order you a new key using that number. You'll need to go there in person, with your ownership papers.
If you still have the valet key, it is identical to the regular key except it's on a thicker blank. Take it to a hardware store and get a new new key made from the valet (on a regular blank) for $3.
If a NEW key (and not one made from the old, worn out key) doesn't work, report back here for instructions on how to do your other requests.
--
TeGGeR

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
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I have located 3 Acura keys with the 4 digits number and for unknown reason all of them work fine today.
As per your suggestion I am going to get a copy of the valet key that shows no sign of been used and wait for the best.
My be I should spray some W4 to the inside of the lock.
Thanks a million for your help
John
wrote:

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If you mean WD-40, please don't. I have fought with several locks that have been WD-40'd and it isn't pretty. The lock works great for a couple years, then the remaining WD-40 stuff gets gummy. At that point the lock is in trouble. I've never found anything that removes the gum, and using any real lock lubricant only makes it worse. Another spray of WD-40 will loosen it up for a while, but the gum undoubtedly builds up.
LockEase is my favorite; graphite in a kerosene (or similar) carrier. It's available in most hardware stores and sprays in easily. Just be sure to shroud the lock with a paper towel or rag, as the runoff is messy.
Mike
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On Sun, 1 Oct 2006 09:06:39 -0700, "Michael Pardee"

Yes, that WD-40 it's an interesting lubricant. A few moths ago I decided to spray an outdoor electric outlet. The moment I finished spraying, the cover jumped from the unit, landing about 4 feet from base. I couldn't understand the situation and I installed a new one and again applied the same treatment with the same results.
Apparently the plastic that olds the spring that maintains the cover on, gives up and the cover fly way from the box, without leaving any evidence.
Thanks for the warning.
John
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It's not a lubricant. Neither is it a penetrant.
Nobody seems to know what "WD" stands for any more.
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TeGGeR

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wrote:

WD40 is a very useful penetrant and lubricant for *some* things, but powdered graphite is the best thing for squirting into locks. You can even shave and grind bits off the lead of a soft pencil, if you've nothing better to hand. It works wonders and it doesn't gum up the works.
--
Dan.

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Better be an 8B pencil, unless you like clay abrading your locks. Pencils are a clay/graphite amalgam. Clay is hygroscopic, bad news for your locks.
The best thing I've ever found is Rust Check or Krown T30, both only available in Ontario, Canada. At less than -20F, it gets a bit thick, so you have to turn the lock slowly, but it never gums up, evaporates or collects water. Regular copious shots every few months will keep your locks like new forever, and you'll NEVER suffer from frozen locks or broken dust flaps.
Graphite-based substances are fine for the ignition lock, but not for anything exposed to the weather. I don't care what anybody says. 25 years of experimentation and experience tell me what's best.
If you are unlucky and do not live in Ontario, any sewing machine or gun oil will do. Kroil and PB Blaster are also decent. It's best to choose an aerosol which will invade every nook and cranny of your lock, and "creep" forever, repelling water always.
--
TeGGeR

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It is neither a lubricant nor a penetrant. "WD" stands for "Water Displacing". The stuff is meant to banish water from electrical circuits.
--
TeGGeR

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Water-Displacing.....formula #40.
--
Jim Yanik
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Kewpie doll to tha winnah!
--
TeGGeR

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I guess it's partly in that role that it does what I most like it for; cleaning tools. It is a fair solvent for the oil/dirt mixture that sticks to tools and leaves a rust-inhibiting coating. For threads on pullers and the like I prefer light oil.
Mike
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