shifting too soon in Type-S deadly?

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Not from me, that's for sure.
I think that the majority of Corvettes sold have automatic transmissions. Maybe GM just doesn't care enough about the relatively few buyers of their product who don't want a torque converter transmission.
--
Dan.

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wrote:

these days,very few standard transmissions are sold,less than 1 in 10,IIRC,for all models of cars. I'm worried they may do away with them altogether,or charge a "premium" for them,make THEM the "option" rather than the automatic.
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Jim Yanik
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...in North America. Manuals are quite popular in the rest of the world due to government tax policies.

I don't think that's likely to happen. Automatics are a LOT more expensive to install than manuals, and the automakers already have the manuals on the shelf.
The only cars where manuals are entirely off the menu are those where sales would be virtually nil (minivans and SUV's for instance).
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Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
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CRV manual...gone (for USA anyway).
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We're talking about a manual transmission, right? How does the driver know they can't use 2nd and 3rd...lights on the dash or trial-and-error?
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Oh, so you consider those "good quality auto mags" something other than the same marketing BS as in the glossy brochures?
Unlike you, the car

Don't forget about the full, frontal 2-page spreads!
I'd rather drive my car than read about someone else's car. Maybe that's why I know how to shift thru its gears.
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wrote:

Car and Driver magazine said that was the reason for the skip-gear;to meet emissions on the EPA tests.
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Jim Yanik
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those EPA tests wouldn't be related to the gas guzzler tax, would they?

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in

Do I believe the Corvette trans. is built to withstand more abuse than a Honda manual trans.? Yup, esp. 1st and 2nd gear.

While I believe what you are saying, I often skip gears in my '89 Legend with over 210K miles and have had zero trans. problems. Other owners I know report similar experiences. Oh yeah, I used to skip shift my '72 Porsche, my old Audi and Integra, too. No trans. problem with any of these.
Having driven with other, shall we say less mechanically inclined drivers, may I say that Honda is probably on the right track but they've taken a wrong turn. LOTS of Honda manual trans. drivers DOWNSHIFT without attempting to blip the throttle via heel/toe or double clutching. There's the wear, they're using the clutch and trans. for braking. I have a hard time buying into the Honda line that skipping gears while gently accelerating is causing any damage. Sure, if you force the gear change, you're gonna cause damage. But for the most part, Honda is blowing smoke to cover up a weak trans. design, IMHO.

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In case anybody's still interested, here is Honda's official word, from the Jan '06 issue of Honda Service News:
Skip Shifting Is Brutal on Synchronizers
Gear ratios in 6-speed manual trannies are spaced close together so you can keep the engine speed in its optimum range for max power and acceleration.
Shifting to the next higher or lower gear in a close-ratio tranny causes small changes in engine speed.
Shifting a close-ratio tranny through its gears by the numbers puts a very small load on the synchronizers since they only have to make small changes to the speed of the mainshaft and the clutch disc.
Some drivers, though, like to skip shift so they dont have to work the clutch pedal and shift lever as much. They like to accelerate in 1st gear, then pop it into 3rd gear, then into 5th or 6th. Skip shifting, though, is really brutal on synchronizers; it puts a higher demand on them than they were designed to take. Skip shifting can cause premature synchronizer wear that can cause the gears to grind when you shift up or down.
If youve got a vehicle in your shop for repeated damage to the synchronizers, go for a test-drive with your service client to see if he or she is guilty of skip shifting. Skip shifting can be an expensive habit to break. Any repairs due to skip shifting may be reviewed and debited by your DPSM.
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Tegger

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wrote:

Thanks for doing the research, Tegger.
The moral of the story: if you must skip shift, double clutch. Or maybe: double clutch it now or double clutch it later.
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When in sixth, does everyone go down all 5 gears? I never did in my RSX.
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All these points from all responses are well taken...thanks.
Think I'm going to start drive my Type S more aggressively and more to the manual's speed specifications for when to shift. Love driving hard and fast...but also love having a car for a very long life. Where I live (northern Midwest region) lots of roads are in pretty crappy condition; pot holes, cracks, bad repairs...the works. So fast driving has the backlash of tires, shocks and alignment abuse. Why did I buy a manual? Really like the experience of shifting. As I'm sure you know, keeps you more involved in the ride. Besides...for me, automatics are boring.
About the awareness of knowing what one's engine doesn't like? Have always liked to think I had a good sense of that. In my RSX, I rarely ever (may just once or twice) have experienced any even slight lugging when letting clutch out in lower gears as I shift to higher ones. Have never noticed any lack of "shift quality" when gear skipping either. Overwhelming majority of them are smooth and precise with no excess revs higher or lower as clutch lets out completely...which is why I've never thought I've been doing damage to synchros.
But like it's been pointed out, Honda knows best. Who am I to argue? Again, thanks for the input.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote in

Don't let the engine go below 2K rpm after shifting and you're fine.

You won't notice until the damage is done. And once it's done, the fix is expensive. Damage takes time; it doesn't happen in a few months.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote in

Cool. But 160K isn't very much these days, and how do you know there's no damage? Can you tell what bearing noise sounds like?

Bad. This tears up the synchros. Go through the gears properly. If you don't like shifting, you should have bought an automatic.

Proper "downshifting" does not involve the brakes, and does not cause any sort of jerks or bumps as you let the clutch out.

But adding side-load on the tranny bearings, plus hammering the engine crank and connecting rod bearings.
Why did you buy a manual again?

Not good. This is called "lugging". Major long-term engine bearing damage. Why did you buy a manual in the first place?

It ought to, at least once in a while. If you putter around like an old man all the time, soft carbon deposits can accumulate, holding valves open, causing driveability problems and valve burning. And that's quite expensive.

*He* isn't right, *HONDA* is right.
Do you think Honda put those specifications in the manual for fun? Or just for something to fill up pages with?

Yep. You want 300K out of your tranny? Observe the manual's directives. And change the tranny oil every 30K miles, with Honda MTF.
Manual transmissions are for people who like shifting and exploring the interaction of man and machine. If you want the shifter to be as unobtrusive as possible, you should have got an automatic.
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