There must be another way to remove an alternator from a 92 integra

and here is why,
My father removed my sisters alternator in 20 minutes, He did not remove the axle, and he doesn't remember how he did it, but I know my
father is not capable of removing the axle in 20 minutes. He believes he may have removed the master cylinder, but unless the master cylinder comes out without needing to disconnect a clevis type assemble from under the floor board, I cannot believe he did this either, because he is not that flexible, or skilled. Please if anyone is holding out on the secret of nyhm here, i would love to know, what is the easiest way to remove it from a 1992 Integra?
thanks in advace.
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You have to remove the left driveshaft. There is no other way to do it.
I suppose it might be possible by removing the master cylinder, but the intake manifold and brake booster loom rather large in there. I very much doubt you could take it out the top.
If all you need to do is change the brushes, that can be done without unmounting the alternator from its bracket and without removing the driveshaft.
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Tegger

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I'm almost positive I did the alternator on my '93 without removing the driveshaft. As I remember, I had to jack up the driver's side high, turn the alt and pull it up on the other side of the block - I think the brake booster had to come out?. I'll have to double check to refresh my memory. I'm very reluctant to challenge anything Tegger comes up with because he's helped me over the years and it a fantastic resource to the DA community. I don't know how I fit the round peg in the square hole but there is a trick.
Thanks. Andrew.
in article Xns9893ADEF86647tegger@207.14.116.130, Tegger at snipped-for-privacy@tegger.cm wrote on 12/8/06 5:08 PM:

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I have it on very good authority that it is impossible to remove the alternator in a 2nd gen Integra without removing the left driveshaft.
I did have a good look just now though, and I suppose it *might* be possible to withdraw the alternator upwards if the brake master cylinder and booster were removed, along with the bracket for the fuel return line. There might be *just* enough room for it, provided you turn the alternator just so... Kinda the long way around, don't you think? With proper tools, the driveshaft is pretty easy to remove.
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removing the brake BOOSTER seems like a worse job than pulling the halfshaft.Gotta crawl under the dash,pull brake lines off the brakeMC,what a mess...then bleed the brakes afterwards....
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Jim Yanik
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He's probably referring to "DA9", which is Honda's model designation for the 2-door hatch (or 3-door if you're in the marketing department) second-generation Integra.
The 2-door hatches were DA9, and the 4-door sedans were DB1.
Examples of VIN fragments: DA934 DA9 = 2-door hatch 3 = manual transmission 4= base trim level (RS)
DB146 DB1 = 4-door sedan 4 = automatic transmission 6 = GS trim level.
If you want to get even more mysteriously Teggish, you can refer to the "SK7" community. All parts unique to the second-generation Integra have SK7 either stamped on them, or as the middle portion of the part number.
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