Timing belt Time belt

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I am surprised by the Timing belt business, all Honda cars, including Acura, need timing belt replacement near 80,000 miles, I am wondering why the ^%$# manufacturers don't want to make the belt with better
material that lasts for life time of the car.
Another puzzle bothers me is that in my younger days with old American made cars, there is no such thing as timing belt, we called timing chain, and the chain lasted for life time of the car. (surely there are few occasions that the timing chain failed, but I am sure there is no maintenance requirement for replacing timing chain every nnnnnn miles).
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j~ wrote:

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What's your question?
'Curly'
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motsco_ :

why can not fabricate the timing belt with better material that lasts for life time of the car?
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The belts are made with high quality rubber and Kevlar. What material do you think would work better?
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On Sat, 08 Dec 2007 14:12:16 -0600, Gordon McGrew

How about numerous short metal pieces, joined together with flexible links? You could even make the metal pieces with an opening in them, so that a toothed metal wheel of some sort could engage the openings and turn or be turned by a loop or belt made of such joined links.
I'll bet something like that would last longer than ones made of rubber and Kevlar.
--
Dan.

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wrote:

You could even give such a contraption a fancy new name, like "chain" for example.
In fact, that's exactly what many of the newest Hondas have...
--
Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
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wrote:

Damn. Can't a man even fish in peace these days?
--
Dan.

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I hear dynamite is an effective fishing tool.
--
Tegger

The Unofficial Honda/Acura FAQ
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On Sat, 08 Dec 2007 16:05:41 -0500, Dean Dark

The original Saturns used such a system with disastrous results. Not that it can't be made to work, but as is often the case, the engineering details trump the generalities of the solution.
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On Sat, 08 Dec 2007 16:05:41 -0500, Dean Dark

Posted yesterday in the Saturn Newsgroup:
Had it [2002 Saturn] towed in to the saturn dealer. They confirmed the broken chain diag. They proceeded to further inspect the upper end for valve damage and found 4 bent valves. They then proceeded to install a remanufactured head and new timing chain. They called me today to tell me they got it running, and were test driving it when one of the valves in the newly remanufactured head 'fell in' and proceeded to destroy the entire engine. SATURN (not my third party agreement) is now paying to install a new complete engine assembly. They'll call when it's done.
I guess those metal links aren't all that great after all.
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Gordon McGrew wrote: <SNIP> They called me today to tell me they got it running, and were test driving it when one of the valves in the newly remanufactured

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I had a really old volvo 122a and the 'keepers' on the top end of a valve / valve spring popped off while I was climbing a hill. Before I could shut it down the valve fell into the cylinder and went down and then back up. It didn't hit its hole in the guide properly and forced out the guide right through the steel valve cover. That was a funny sight !
I was three hours from home so I called my employer and got them to tell the Volvo shop to put a valve and a guide on the bus. I got a room and convinced the mechanic that I'd borrow a few of his tools and I pulled the head. Parts arrived and I put the head in a cardboard box and hitch hiked to the next town where a shop had a proper press and the needed skills.
I drove that vehicle for a few more years.
'Curly'
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It must be good stuff. We have 273K miles on our 98 Accord EXV6 and never changed the timing belt. My father has just under 180K on his 00 Acura TL. He went through one tranny already, but ALL of the belts have held up just fine.
I believe these belts are made to last the life of the vehicle. Has anyone else actually had one break?
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James wrote:

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X
"Grain of salt" warning. . .
'Curly'
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What does this mean? Could you elaborate?
james
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James wrote:

The manual says you'll damage a Honda engine if you don't change the timing belt. You said you don't think it ever needs to be changed.
I say your advice should be taken with a 'grain of salt'...
'Curly'
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"The manual says..." But what do you say based on your experience? If my engine is damaged, how can I tell? It runs just fine.
Can you explain what happens inside an engine that never has had a belt change?
I don't believe the manual, because my vehicle is proof that these belts (and my engine) will last for many miles.
james
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James wrote:

I know the engineers at Honda / Acura aren't dummies. I've blown timing belts on a couple of Dodge products without damage, but they weren't INTERFERENCE engines. Read through this page to understand the difference: http://www.tegger.com/hondafaq/engines.html#interference You'll understand why the engine dies the same day the belt does. It's not called _catastrophic failure_ for no reason. :-(
'Curly'
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I don't believe they are dummies either Curly, that's why I buy Hondas.
My problem is with greed ($$$):
"GREED n. - An excessive desire to acquire or possess more than what one needs or deserves, especially with respect to material wealth"
Are you catching on yet? ;o)
james
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I hit the trigger without elaborating. Sorry about that.
GREED:
1. Design an interference engine so that it costs the customer more for repairs. If Dodge can design a non-interference engine, why didn't Honda? Is it so hard to machine a piston's top so that it doesn't collide with the valves?
2. Why use a rubber belt that could break and ruin your engine? Why not use a chain? I'll tell you why. Because it costs me more for repairs.
But that's the name of the game, right?
Isn't business all about making money?
james
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On Fri, 14 Dec 2007 11:30:25 -0500, "James" <anonymous> wrote:

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