a4 mods most bang 4 the buck?

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what is the general concensus on the lowest cost mods which provide the most performance gains?

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wrote:

chip
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WAIT!
Which model A4 is it?
If you have the 1.8T then yea - chip all the way...
But if you have the non turbo 3.0 6, then the chip isnt that great. At most it gives you a little better throttle response...
On the 3.0L it might be after market exhaust, or better suspension.
Good luck,
Adam
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Chip.
Cheers,
Pete
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Unless you already have at least three under your belt, driver schools.
Audi Club NA offers good ones, although I personally think the BMW CCA club schools are better in some subtle ways. Shop around. -- C.R. Krieger ACNA, BMW CCA instructor
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hey mr. geiger oh sorry he's the guy that designed the "alien" , kreiger, r u implying that i have less than adequet driving skills? correct me if im taking your post as an insult. but the post is a question of modifications of the car, not the driver. and 4 your information im 30 and have been driving since i was 14. my first sports cars were irocs and 5.0 mustangs then a 86 corvette. as i became older and a bit wiser i came to the realization that american cars for the most part are junk. this can be argued and flamed but im sure you agree the japs and germans have got it over us yankees when it comes to auto engineering. i then had a stock 90 300zx naturally aspirated 5spd and regulary beat 5 liter mustangs of the same year/s. im not saying im a mario andretti or anything but i can hold my own. not saying that a good driving school would not be beneficial but that brings us again to the post. my next cars were bmws, (am i redeemed?) 92 325, 94 325, and finally a 95 m3 which i can say was overall the best pure sport car i've ever owned, the 300z a close second. i had mainly bolt on mods, dinan air intake, strut brace, came across a larger maf from a 7 series which i adapted with the help of some plumbing supplys from lowes, yes im a good fabricator. and a turner chip. estorial blue black gut beautiful car, r-title unfortunatly but that didn't bother me. but unfortunatly i live in northeast pa and we have some nasty winters and with limited cash available a second winter car was not possible. so i traded it in on a 99 a4 1.8t quattro tiptronic auto. which i can honestly say is the best combination of sport and practicality i have ever owned. its winter here now and im running bridgestone blizzacks on the stock rims and i can go up steeper hills than some suvs! it dosen't have the raw power and handling of the m3 but i still love the car, i just want to add a little more pep and stiffen up the suspension a bit. i admit i am a newbie to audis and a turbocharged car in particular but im learning. i had to have the frame pulled on the m3 and it needed a door and a quarter, so i stripped the car down to a shell almost and put it back together including the entire interior, glass, driveshaft exhaust and fuel tank. gimme an old 3 series in a box of parts and i can put it back together with my eyes closed. i just had the unfortunate experience of a hit and run while the car was parked, i ended up replacing the rear passenger door, it could have been repaired but i got a complete door for $350 in the same color of the car so i just bolted it on. this was my first endevor into taking apart the interior it was necessary to gain access to the bolts which secure the door to the pillar. after making some shims and splicing the vacume line for the lock i got it back together and looks like nothing ever happened. the bmw's were definately more user friendly and easier to dissasemble but getting back to the subject i've decided on a bypass valve, cold air intake, and i guess from what im hearing "chip" but from what i've heard it is not more less a chip replacement but removing the ecu and sending it out to be reprogrammed, correct me if im wrong. so there you have it. p.s. mr krieger i have a lot of spare bmw parts laying around, 2 mafs in particular a quite expensive part from the dealer. let me know if your interested or maybe we could trade for a few driving lessons?? cheers....

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You may have "adequet" driving skills, but your writing skills can improve a bit ;-)
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It's 'Krieger' (German) and no, I'm not implying your skills are less than adequate. I'm suggesting that they might be less than *optimum*. As an enthusiast and club instructor, I firmly believe that no one should be modifying any car one normally drives unless and until one can demonstrate the skill to safely and reliably exceed the car's limits. Sure; you can probably safely handle more acceleration, but what happens when you gotta *turn*?

I'm sure you are. A lot of guys have been insulted. At the same time, a few have taken my advice. Ask *them* if they're still insulted. A few have proven to already have the background I suggest and they fully understand why I suggest it.

Understood. However, you wanted the "most bang 4 the buck". That's driver school. Everybody who's been through at least one knows why. Among other things, long after the A4 is gone, you'll still have the knowledge and skills you acquired while driving it.

I was 37 when I finally got into my first school and it was a total revelation. You know how some Christians get 'born again'? That's what a good driver school will do for a 'good' driver. You'll suddenly realize how lousy you were up to that time; how many things you could do better; how many things you're just flat out doing wrong.

Yeah; and I drove old Hemis, Chrysler 300 letter cars, and assorted other Mopar B Blocks followed by years of Toyotas, Audi Quattros, and BMWs. *What* you drive has no bearing on *how well* you drive it. I've told the story of 'The Corvette Brothers' here in Usenet before. A couple of 'Vette club members who'd gotten a pretty good reputation among their peers (who apparently didn't place a lot of emphasis on *education*) and who came to a BMW (Audi?) club school at Blackhawk Farms Raceway in Illinois where I was helping out. I got assigned to the one with the '72 454 5-speed. He was absolutely clueless about how to get around a race track in that car. It took quite awhile to get through to him, but we finally did. I hear he's improved a lot since.

Mario isn't known for drag racing. He *is* known for getting bunted off the Esses at Mid Ohio by Bobby Rahal in an IROC race Mario was *sure* he was going to win - at least up until overconfidence, a slightly 'open' line, and a driver who knew that track well got the better of him.

After you can *drive* them, sure.

Had you known and listened to some of the people I know, you might not have bothered with the intake mods before seeing that the head can flow more. You can slap all kinds of expensive or low-cost fabricated stuff on the *outside* of a BMW engine without having much effect. As for the strut brace, well, you're new here. You haven't seen my lengthy exchanges with the guys who were absolutely convinced that, because they'd spent all that money on a shiny accessory, it *had to* make a difference in the car's handling. No one has yet shared any data from instrumented tests showing *how*, although I've asked frequently. Not that they're useless; but you have to have skills like Hans Stck to realize the benefits.

Not quite as nasty as the lake effect snows in northeast Ohio where I grew up.

The very first thing to stiffen up the suspension would be 'dump the Blizzaks'. I've been there. The biggest influence on your suspension will be tires, not springs, shocks, antiroll bars, or strut braces. It's why there haven't been Blizzaks on *any* of my cars in several years. This is the stuff you'd already know from a good driver school.

I'm wondering about the theoretical effect of a cold air intake for air that's going to get passed through a *hot* exhaust-driven turbo and then ... doesn't the A4 have an intercooler? If you knew more about physics and chemistry than about auto parts, you'd be wondering, too.

So do I, but nothing as new as an E36; and your MAFs won't do much good on a 3.5l E28.

If you have a matched pair of Webers for my 3.0 Bavaria, I'd talk trade. Otherwise, like everyone else, you gotta pay for it. In your location, you have two of the best tracks you can find for schools: Watkins Glen and Lime Rock. I've driven both and enjoyed them immensely. So should you. -- C.R. Krieger (Been there; done that)
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Mr. Kreiger, and buy the way I am almost 95% German myself. I admit that your knowledge of autos and driving are far above mine. I also apologize if my post was insulting in any way to you. I agree with you that everyone can benefit from learning some good driving skills, and if we were ever to meet i'm sure you could teach me a thing or two about driving. I do not want to argue with you or anyone else, like I said I am a newbie when it comes to Audis and by posting I am attempting to improve my knowledge of the car and mods, not to be flamed. And for the person who commented on my "writing skills" I graduated with high honors from my high school, and attended the University of Scranton. The post was written quickly and I used unorthodox abbreviations, R ,U, etc to get the point across quickly. Can you figure out this abbreviation, GFY. Getting back to C.R. "*What* you drive has no bearing on *how well* you drive it." I agree with you, I was just giving a bit of background info on myself. I forgot to include the many sport bikes I have also owned, so im no newbie to mind blowing accelleration. In addition to the A4 currently my two wheeled baby is a 95 Honda 900RR. Now as for the blizzacks they are by far the best snow tire available, I do not care what any one thinks thats the truth. And, I'm not a complete idiot I am well aware that you are not going to get any type of handling or conering from snow tires on stock rims, but like I said it's winter time and they are necessary. When the weather breaks I plan on getting a slightly larger rim than stock and a good set of performance rubbers. I'm not trying to make the A4 into a 10 sec car, I just want a little gain in acceleration while keeping the inherent reliability and smooth ride of the A4, I just miss the raw power of the M3. As for driving the car to it's limits, you are right I dont know them, but pushing a any car to or beyond it's limits on public roads is not only dangerous but foolish. This area has an abundance of ignorant young punks that have seen the Fast and The furious one too many times. They go out and pick up a Honda Civic and then run up to Pep Boys as fast as they can and buy those big ugly aluminum wings, bolt them onto the trunk, then cut off the muffler and put on the largest diameter exhaust tip they can get and drive around like Vin Diesel ha ha.. I regulary whipped them with the old M3, and I still do with my little stock A4, maybe its the window tint that makes them target me, who knows. But I toy with them till i prove my point and then let them fly off like idiots to most likely wreck around the next corner or two. As for my M3 mods, The Dinan intake was free from my buddy at active foreign auto parts, for screwing up my order, the large maf was "donated" from a vandalized 7 series at my buddy's garage which came from New York, some drug dealers car which was in limbo for months. and the strut brace was a cheap but quite durable model from cosom racing. The Turner chip was the only expensive mod, and although you can disagree I did see a noticable performance gain from the maf/chip/intake upgrade. But for most applications the car in its stock state was by far fast enough. Im looking for some mods to gain some straight line accelleration. So again in your opinion what mods would be affective for achieving this? And I am considering driving school. please send me some info on your school if you wish, snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.net . I have been humbled by your post and if I were a k9 I would be walking with my tail between wy legs ha ha. "Forgive me Father, I am a worm....." Kurgan, Highlander 1. When money premits it I plan to aquire a 94 or up 540 stick. As for the Webbers, let me check my spare parts box in the closet, you may be suprised what I have in there. Thanks, Dave

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. Our schools are all at www.badgerbimmers.org, but those are all no closer than Michigan or Illinois to you. I mentioned Lime Rock and Watkins Glen. Audi Club NA and BMW CCA both have schools at both venues. Check their websites; join one, and get out there. -- C.R. Krieger (Been there; done that)
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C.R. Krieger,
I have a question for you. From reading one of your posts, it has become apparent to me that I ride the clutch sometimes and would like to figure out how to get away from it. I'm not new to manual transmission, but every car I have had before my A4 has been old. Can you give me some instruction on how to transistion from a stop without putting too much wear on the clutch plates?
Rob
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Sorry, my name is not Krieger.
Try driving away without touching the gas pedal for some time until you get the hang of it. Don't put your left foot on the ground but use it free air.
Ronald
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agreed, dont apply throttle while your about to release clutch pedal, the faster the flywheel is turning the more wear will occur, so slowly lift clutch and when you feel it "bite" gradually increase the engine speed while smoothly and switly releasing the remaining clutch pedal travel. never rest your foot on the pedal, this will increase wear not to mention reduce the life of the release bearing. the sooner the clutch is engaged the sooner the clutch will grind to a halt against the flywheel and stop the wear process. another good tip for long clutch life is dont change gear unless necessary and always choose the appropriate gear for the conditions, EG: dont try and negate a steep hill at slow speeds in 5th gear. regards. steve uk.

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Thanks gents, I'll try that...
anon wrote:

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R@L wrote:

Don't apologize. We can't *all* be Kriegers. Not even the 'Kruegers' that *call* themselves Kriegers ...

That will usually involve significant slippage.

I'm not sure *what* that means.
Here's what I usually suggest:
Try to get your 'starting out' clutch engagement done in under a second. Experiment with 'blipping' the throttle so there's a little engine momentum when you release it. Getting the right amount for each car is different, so you need to learn it for *your* car. Once you do, you should be fine. Learn to be decisive about it, as well. Once you start your movement up, make it smooth and continuous and then get your foot off the pedal. If you stall or buck, remember that next time and try a little more throttle application. It simply takes practice and experience in *that particular car*.
Going between gears, try to get your clutch engagements done in less than a half-second. That doesn't mean you need to *shift* in a half second, just release the clutch pedal from fully depressed to fully released in a half second. -- C.R. Krieger (A *real* Krieger)
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<snip>
Sorry...but am i the only one inhere which grew up using manual trans? I had problems adjusting to my A4s automatic...for crying out loud! *gg* I thought manual transmissions were like...you know, THE most common.
And seeing Krieger asking how to use a clutch, is like asking how to walk....the most natural thing of all ;-) (no pun intended...really!)
To be realistic: percent-wise...what is the most common way of shifting a gear worldwide? Manual or automatic?
--
Gio






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"Gio" wrote

Worldwide I'm not sure, but in the US it's definitely automatic that's in majority. Some car models aren't even available with a manual option, not even if you pay extra. :) Most people learn how to drive and pass their driving exams without ever learning what a clutch is and without ever seeing one. Which is not bad, just different :-)
Cheers,
Pete
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Hiya Pete....
Yeah, i know "Los Americanos" is born with automatic shifting per se, and are having BIG problems when they visit europe. But here in europe, most cars are manuals - but more and more auto-trannys are showing up. But i think the reason for the manual popularity here, is that automatic is WAY more expensive when you buy your new ride. Hell....im back to manual again, after i sold my A4. And i MISS MY TipTronic!!! *sigh*
--
H.a.n.d.
Gio



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"Gio" wrote

Yeah, I'm in Europe as well, although I spent a lot of time across the pond, too. In addition to initial cost, I think other reasons are higher fuel consumption (at least with traditional automatics, not stuff like multitronic/CVT), and being afraid of higher repair costs should anything go wrong - whether that's true, I don't know.

Heh... after driving manual all my life, at one point I went out and bought an Accord V6 auto (that was in the US). Within a year I got so bored of it and fed up with the way it worked, I quickly sold it and bought a manual A4 1.8Tq. Been having fun with it ever since 2001, now in Europe. :-)
Cheers,
Pete
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Gio wrote:

Not in the US; not by a long shot.

Um, reread the thread. I didn't *ask*. I *was asked*.

In the US, it's unquestionably automatic. Probably 90% or more.
I'd guess (and a guess is all it is) that in most other parts of the world, it's manual, but in the more developed parts such as Japan and Europe, I would expect it's drifting toward autoboxes as well as they get better, more fuel efficient, and people in general get lazier. -- C.R. Krieger (Not crashing)
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