a6

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just got an audi a6 its my first audi and i wish i had got one long ago but can anyone answer a couple of questions please.. there are 2 rear fog light lenses either side of the number plate but only
one light comes on is this correct the garage tell me it is. what is the asr how and when should it be used.. its the 2.5 tdi v6 1999 how often should i change the oil and get a service done..
is there anything i should watch out for or should do to keep this car in good condition. unfortunatley i never got a user manual with it so also if anyone as one i would be will to but it off you thanxs stef
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only one light should work, possibly something to do with clashing with brake lights.
asr.......no idea what does it stand for
oil every 6k (diesel)
service, check manual (once you get one)
keep it garaged 100% of the time only take out to dust off or clean.
keep an eye on ebay http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Audi-Owners-Manuals-and-Wallet-for-Audi-A6_W0QQitemZ4594179064QQcategoryZ18334QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
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Juan Hunglow wrote:

15.000 km if it's not longlife. 35.000 km if it's longlife.
Wolfgang
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Stef, The rear fog light on the driver's side should be the only one that turns on with the switch - I don't know the logic behind it but that's the way it is. I would suggest that you get an owner's manual from either your local dealer, or eBay or somewhere else on the net - it will answer your asr and maintenance intervals - I doubt that anyone here with one wants to have you "but it off" them ;-). You might want to hang out in the A6 forum on www.audiworld.com (not sure if there's a .co.uk version) - there will be lots of advice and BTDT's on there. Since your car has a turbo, make sure you use synthetic oil and cool the turbo down after hard driving before you shut down. Cheers! Steve Sears 1987 Audi 5kTQ 1980 Audi 5k 1962 and '64 Auto Union DKW Junior deLuxes (SPAM Blocker NOTE: Remove SHOES to reply)

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Stef wrote:

I think they're right, I never checked on mine. Strange, hmm?

Anti Schlupf Regelung The ASR powers down the engine if the wheels loose grip on slippery surfaces. Combined with the Electronic Differential lock (brakes the spinning wheel using the brakes) it acts as a helper to get you moving on snow. You don't have to switch it on. It's on all the time and if you press the button it's OFF! An orange triangle will come on in the dash, warning you about this. It's reset to ON automatically when you start the engine the next time.

Uh well, depends. If it's on longlife service it should tell you. You find out if it's on LLS either by asking a dealer to check up the car ID (questionable, depending on the honesty of the dealer?) or by just starting the engine and press the left knob in the instrument cluster (car must be at standstill, otherwise you'll set a speedwarning threshold with this action). A LLS car would report the remaining milage to service (depending on the drivers driving habits).

Check: MAF, front suspension and oilfilm on the engine.
For all three of them there is a service bulletin at Audi. MAF: powerloss => replace MAF and disconnect post-shutdown heating of the MAF front suspension: some creaking because of increased play in the bushings => dealer should check. oilfilm on the engine: some series of the 2,5 150HP engines had the crankshaft vent sized too small. There is a sieve in there which can get clogged by oilslug and then the pressure in the engine increases, blowing oil out the seals. => Dealer can check, there's a service bulletin and that should have been done quite early.
Once this is done IMO the car is rock solid and cheap to maintain, even at the (austrian) dealer.

Sorry, mine is in german and I still need it :-)
regards
Wolfgang
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As others have said, this is correct - only the offside rear foglight is functional. This is, supposedly, safer because the brake lights should be more obvious when there's only a single fog.

anti-slip regulation (or the German equivalent, which Wolfgang has given. It's a simple form of traction control - it reduces engine power when the driven wheels start to lose traction. It is always on by default - you turn it off by pressing the button and a light comes on in the instrument console to warn you that it is disabled. The only time you might need to turn it off is when there is almost no traction at all, and the only way to make progress is to keep the wheels spinning.

A 1999 car probably isn't equipped for long life service. Long Life service came in with the 2000 model year, construction of which started during 1999. This will be determined from the VIN - if the VIN is 4BYN 002888, or later, then it is eligible for long life service (although this is not necessarily activated). A 4BX.... VIN would definitely not be long life.
You should find that the legends 'In1' or 'In2' come up in the odometer (or is it the digital clock?) when a service is due. As far as I can tell, the service interval should be 9,375 miles(15000kms) or 1 year. If you email me the VIN I should be able to confirm the details.

In my experience, the Audi dealer price for printed manuals is very reasonable (I bought a 230 page manual for the newer Nav system for less than 6) - assuming that the manual is still available!
It might be worth trying VAG Parts (http://www.vagparts.co.uk ). They usually offer a signifiacnt saving over dealer prices, although they do have to charge postage.
--
Peter Bell (Note Spamtrap - To reply, replace 'invalid' with 'bellfamily')

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wrote:

as for their pricing, I replaced both heated wing mirrors and bought them from my local Audi dealer at 40 the pair.............vagparts want 60 + postage.
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You will most prob be able to just remove the cover on the back and fit a bulb in, instantly giving you 2 x fog lights :)
You may have to open up the rear cover a little with a dremel to accomodate the bulb, but it is a simple job, all the wiring and connectors should be in there :P
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I was certainly able to do this on my A4 (B5), but as far as I can tell, the cabling just wasn't present on my old A6 (my2000) and isn't on my current RS6 or wife's A2.
--
Peter Bell (Note Spamtrap - To reply, replace 'invalid' with 'bellfamily')

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Peter Bell wrote:

Why would anyone want to do that? If you drive behind a car with two foglights (japanese cars used to have two) you will notice that your side vision does not respond as good as usual to the brake light. You will have to focus your eyes on the car in front all the time to notice when the brake lights come on. If there was only one fog light, or even better; no foglight, you would notice the brake light even if you looked to the side as you sometimes have to do in traffic. Wrong use og foglights has probably caused more accidents than correct use has prevented.
Jone T.
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"Jone Tytlandsvik" <jone> wrote in message

Define correct use?
UK cars have always had 2 x rear fog lights, it's only recently we have seen cars come with oinly 1 foglight, so we are used to having 2, and why are most cars still pre-wired for 2.
If you think the use of no fog lights would allow you too see the brake lights better then you need to re-take your test.
Foglights are there to allow you to see a car further ahead, when the brake light is on it would normally be too late, especially in fog.
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In the states correct use of foglights I believe occurs when visibility is less than 100 ft. Common sense would dictate their use when you can's clearly see the car in front at a reasonable distance

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thanxs for all your eplies they have been a great help i never meant to cause an arguement over fog lights though ;o) i do have another question though the oil indicator on the dashboard goes all the way over to the red mark i think it on 180 degrees or something is this correct thanxs stef

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You mean oil temperature? There is definitely something wrong if yours is showing 180 degrees celsius. My temperature meter starts from 60 degrees, and normal is somewhere around 80 degrees when engine is warm, if I remember correct. Could the oil temperature sensor be faulty? I don't know where it gets the reading .
Regards, Sami

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Sami, I believe that the normal oil temperature should be over 100 degrees to burn off condensation and the like. 80C sounds more like coolant than oil temp. Cheers! Steve Sears 1987 Audi 5kTQ 1980 Audi 5k 1962 and '64 Auto Union DKW Junior deLuxes (SPAM Blocker NOTE: Remove SHOES to reply)

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"Steve Sears" wrote

It doesn't take 100 deg. C for water to start evaporating. I mean, leave a glass of water in a room temperature, and it'll eventually evaporate, too.
FYI, the oil in my 1.8T engine (A4) always ran at about 80-85 deg. C. I had the used oil analyzed many times, and it never indicated that water was present. I kept asking my dealer and AoA about this temp, and they always said that this temp falls well in what they consider "normal" operating range.
Regards,
Pete
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I don't think so! This is the normal temp range for coolant, not oil. Oil should be significanbtly hotter than your coolant, in ANY 4-cycle gas engine. Diesels -- perhaps a bit cooler than gas, but not below the coolant temp.

-- Jay. (remove dashes for legal email address)
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120 C is the normal temp for oil in a fully warmed up engine while being driven on the highway at 2000-3000 rpm (most vehicles). This corresponds to about 250 F. It should *definitely* be well above 100C (212F)!
On Fri, 2 Dec 2005 14:48:16 -0500, "Steve Sears"

-- Jay. (remove dashes for legal email address)
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"Jay Somerset" wrote

Can you please provide a reputable source for this information?
Thanks,
Pete
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A w e s o m e !
--
Sara4974


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