Brake pad rotor replacement

I'm looking to replace the read pads on my 2000 Audi TT quattro. Can I use a C-clamp to compress the cylinder? Do I need to turn the cylinder? Anything I might want to watch out for?
I was thinking about replacing the rotors at the same time. Is the process the same as most cars?
Thanks; Dan B snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Dan,
There are special tools that will push the piston back and rotate it at the same time. Get one for ca. USD 20; it's a good investment. I've replaced my rear pads twice using this.
But I don't know what the procedure is to change the rotors/disks. Anyone? ...
/Robert
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If the rears are like a '98 v6 A4 quattro, they are pretty easy to do if you have the tool that compresses and turns. When I did it a couple of years back, AutoZone lent me the tool for free (refundable deposit). I did the rotors too and they were quite straight forward.
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Do you have anti lock brakes? If so I would not attempt it till I knew if using the c-clamp process would damage anything. Last time I bought anything for my Audi, I remember it was pretty expensive.
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Bill wrote:

Naturally, an Audi (or any other car) of MY 2000 will have ABS.
A good point about potential damage you bring up. Some have claimed that pushing/rotating the piston back in may, in the event of contaminated brake fluid in the pistons, push the contaminants back up into the ABS mechanism, rendering it less effective. Others say that it makes no difference. YMMV.
If you are worried about this kind of thing (or if you don't flush your hydraulics with new fluid every two years), then an accepted way around this is to loosen slightly the brake fluid nipple on the (rear) brake being worked on, so that the fluid being expelled from the chamber goes out the nipple, not back up the system, when rotating the pistons back into the housing. Of course, use plastic tubing to lead the fluid from the nipple to a bottle. Remember to tighten nipple once job is completed. Repeat for the other brake. Top up brake fluid reservoir with new fluid if needed.
I do the above procedure myself and am pleased with the results.
/Robert
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Thanks for all the help. I called autozone and they have both tools that can be used for the brakes. I think I will take the tube suggestion. I believe the bottle should have fluid in it as not to allow air into the brake system. So thanks to you help I'm going to save about 500.00 by doing this myself and not taking it to the dealer for something that will take me a couple of hours at the most.
Dan
Robert wrote:

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