Oil Drain Plug Sealer

I've been told about various sealers for the oil drain plug. Is this inlue of a copper washer, in addition to, what about plumber's pipe tape?
Thanks,
Bill Graham
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Bill Graham wrote:

Why not just use a copper washer?
If you don't have a washer or can't get one (which seems odd) you can apply a very thin bead of TRV gasket maker (available at any auto parts store for a couple of dollars/euros/whatever) to the flat area of the plug where it would normally contact the crankcase. Tighten normally after giving the RTV a minute or two to form a "skin".
Cheers,
C
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I've got washers. I was just looking for more "what, why" info to educate myself.
Thanks,
Bill

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Even without the washer it will probably only leak a vanishingly small amount of oil if torqued properly. The copper washer is there so that it deforms slightly and forms a tight seal (without any undue wear and tear to the crankcase or oil plug. I generally replace the washer at every oil change. They're dirt cheap. You can buy a whole bag of them for the cost of one oil filter. 8-)
Cheers,
C
Bill Graham wrote:

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That was my plan as well, to replace it every time. I haven't needed a torque wrench with the last few cars I've had (didn't fix them myself). When I worked on my own the last time before this Audi, it was a SAAB 99. Always borrowed one then.
Thanks Chris,
Bill

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While this may be the *proper* (as in 'factory recommended') thing to do, I think it's a bit anal retentive, so I simply reuse them until they start looking a bit flattened out and *then* replace them. As you mentioned, it really doesn't leak much even if you leave the washer completely out and use no sealant of any kind. It's not like there's any significant pressure in there ... -- C.R. Krieger (Been there; done that)
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Copper will 'work harden' as it is worked but is softened by heating to red and quenching quickly. I have salvaged many washers by softening them in this way.
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warp2 snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (C.R. Krieger) wrote in message

I changed the oil today and used a new washer, but I saved the old one just to have as a reference. No leaks. I'm assuming that the Fram I put in there is good enough. I did not have one of those German filters.
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Bill Graham wrote:

Fram filters are crap. Perhaps adequate if you change your oil VERY regularly at 3-5k miles. Nothing more.
I prefer Wix or Hastings filters.
Cheers,
C
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That's what I could find locally without driving all over town. I will be sure to change frequently.
Any opinions on the Lucas products i.e. Oil Stabilizer?

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I don't know anything about that product. My personal opinion is that if you use quality synthetic oil and change it on schedule, you shouldn't have to add *anything* to your oil. The potential for harm is there and there really isn't a whole lot of good that can come from it. Best case is that you're simply flushing money down the toilet.
As far as Lucas in general....I guess I'm just an old timer. I still remember the old adage...."Why do British folks like their beer warm? (pause) Lucas refrigerators." 8-)
Cheers,
C
Bill Graham wrote:

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Here's a better idea because *Fram filters, in particular*, have been known to cause startup oiling problems in Audis. There is no internal drainback check valve, as I understand it, making hydraulic lifter pumpup take an inordinately long time because there's not enough oil pressure (because there's not enough oil remaining in the filter) on startup. In rare cases, Fram filters have been known to *rupture* (You can imagine the result.) on Audis, as well. I'll use Frams on everything (OEM BMW M30 engine filters; Ford truck V-8; Jeep I-6, etc.) *but* my Audis now.
Go to Blaufergngen at www.audiquattroparts.com and buy a case (10) of OEM Mann filters. It won't cost much more, if any, and you'll be sure to have the *correct* filter in the future. If it *didn't really matter* (remember, I'm a guy who reuses the washers), I wouldn't tell you this, but Fram oil filters and Audis are just plain Bad News. -- C.R. Krieger (Been there; done that)
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BILL!!!! (and anybody else who uses the "Agent Orange Canister of Audi Engine Death") Argh....FRAM???? Do yourself a favour and go to Audifans and search under "Fram". The high volume rate of flow is WAY too much for a Fram filter. Although the charts show that a certain filter number will work...THEY WON"T. Under the high flow rate used in your turbo engine, they will implode, and bits of the paper media will plug up internal oil passages leading to.....you guessed it....a blown motor. Get that orange junk outa there. Go to the dealer, call zzmotors or Blau, anything but that. Cheers!
--
Steve Sears
1987 Audi 5kTQ - Bosch and Mann filters _only_ - but a Fram oil pan drain
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Already swapped it out for a MANN. Thanks Steve.
Bill

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"C.R. Krieger" schrieb:

But think about one problem: When the copper washer gets pressed the first time the copper becomes harder. You can reuse a copper washer by glowing it slithly in a gas flame. But be careful not to burn it.
I've done so in the past on sverav cars when changing oil and forgotten to get an new washer. And it was everytime 2 minutes after stores closing when needed a new one :-)
--
Mit freundlichen Gren
Andreas Bockelmann
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Yep, As Andreas says, you can anneal them by heating to red hot with a propane torch (then letting them cool, of course - ouch) - don't quench them in water (let them air cool. Or hey, Fumoto or <shudder>Fram<shudder> make drain valves you don't need wrenches to use - you only need a new washer once for those. Cheers! Steve Sears 1987 Audi 5kTQ - with a Fram Oil Pan Drain Valve - but no orange filters!!!! 1980 Audi 5k 1962 and '64 Auto Union DKW Junior deLuxes (SPAM Blocker NOTE: Remove SHOES to reply)

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