Possible fix for "dead" autoboxes

I don't believe it but apparently it works 9 times out of 10.
Experiencing a slipping box and losing drive after a few minutes? Happened to me once, mechanic told me it needed a new box so ended up scrapping the
car. Wish I had been told this little trick beforehand. For the cost of doing it over replacing the box or the whole car, it's worth a try I reckon.
Drain the box, fill to operating levels with diesel, yes diesel, run the car for about an hour (in gear on some axle stands I guess), drain and clean filter and refill with proper fluid. Fixed!! Full function restored!!
I wouldn't have believed it but saw it done on an Audi 80 with the same problems my old 100 had. It supposedly cleans the belts and the valves.
Anyone know why diesel has this effect?
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IRL

UK 1989 Audi 200 TQ Avant (1B, full leather, hydraulic suspension) 223,000
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5potnoodle wrote:

Besides all the other reasons I think this is a waste of time, how are you going to get all that diesel out afterwards? There is no drain on the torque converter and it hold about 60% of the fluid.
-jim
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Hey, I'm just the messenger, passing on something that might be useful to someone...
I suppose then that the mix only contains 40% of diesel when it's filled with the stuff. And if it doesn't work, the box has to come out to be replaced anyway, so you could then empty the torque converter. Compared to the cost of a replacement box, for a few pence of diesel, you've nothing to lose except time in trying it. And if this tip helps to keep someone's Audi on the road.......
Had another chat with the guy who did it, it's still running fine (I might add this was carried out a month ago). He actually left the engine running, in gear with the handbrake on for about an hour, then switched off drained out and refilled with auto fluid.
BTW he got the tip from an autobox specialist who has carried out this cleaning method to various makes with a great degree of success.
IRL UK 1989 A200TQ Avant (1B, full leather, hydraulic suspension) 223,000 miles and counting......
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Diesel is a good degreaser. In the old days of dirty engines, it was used to clean the engines outside. I think the cleaning effect in the box will make it work for a while. Hopefully just enough to sell the thing off.
Ronald

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It seems logical. Diesel is about the same as Kerosene, which is what you have when you buy a can of WD40 (sold in the U.S. as a solvent/lubricant/rusty nut loosener and other goofy stuff). And being what it is, it will evaporate over time. The evaporation might accelerate when heat is applied, but like some other posts point out, you'll have a good amount left inside that will mix with the new. So perhaps a good thing to do to might be to run it for a little while then drain and replace the fluid again. Especially since it is in a closed place and cannot evaporate out. Just my 2 cents. - Len

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