Re: What I want vs. what the reality could support

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Indeed. There are two things I would do to improve my 3 series:
1/ Improve the throttle response. I don't know if a remap would drastically change this. 2/ LSD. Available from a number of suppliers now.
I would do these before getting rid of runflats where the only issue I can see myself is price (I'm one of the few to use the excellent Michelins though).
--
Z

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On 26/01/2011 03:56, dizzy wrote:

My last petrol turbo car produced max torque between 2,500 rpm and 4,500 rpm, but the max power was developed at 5,700 rpm. But that car *really* came alive after 5,000 rpm, well past peak torque.
My experiments with accelerometers have demonstrated that the greatest 'g' (or acceleration) was produced between the peak torque rpm and the peak power rpm.
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wrote:

Didn't that one explode a lot? --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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On 19 Jan 2011 18:30:16 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

I don't know. It was back in the late 70s and I think it was built for the Italian market that at that time had some really nutty cc-related taxation laws.
I had a '66 Triumph Vitesse with a 1600 cc straight six. The cylinders weren't *that* much bigger than 250 cc. Sweet little engine, it was.
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Hmm, 940kg-2072 lbs, about mazda 2 territory. How much fuel did it gulp then?
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It was a long time ago, I don't remember exactly. I recall that it used a bit more than a typical four did but it couldn't have been outrageously more as I wasn't exactly flushed with cash in those days, and I wouldn't have kept it had it been a fuel-swilling pig.
I kept it until tin-worm ate right through the rear of the chassis in 1974 or so. Cars certainly rotted fast in those pre-galvanization days.
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wrote:

Hmm, 940kg-2072 lbs, about mazda 2 territory. How much fuel did it gulp then?
1600 27-32mpg 2000 28-32mpg
Imperial gallons from Parkers guide.
IIRC the Vitesse had a lethal flaw, whereby in hard cornering the outside rear wheel would fold under the car.
Most Triumphs only had fatal (for the car) flaws, such as rust (all models), clogging injection (2500PI), boiling over (Stag), faulty steering (Toledo), poor build (TR7) etc. etc.
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On Mon, 24 Jan 2011 19:54:39 -0000, "R. Mark Clayton"

That would only happen if you snapped off the throttle in mid-corner, which no capable driver would do. It's the same kind of thinking as the people who believe that the Porsche 911 has a "fatal flaw" because it will spin out if you do the same thing.
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In the best Homer Simpson voice: "Umm, the rear engine layout + RWD... massive weight resting on the rear axle. I love oversteer"
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... and that is *exactly* the kind of misguided 'Homer Simpson' type of thinking that I was talking about. Believe it or not, there are many people out there who think that understeer is A Good Thing.
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Yes, I believe you, judging by the fact that there are few affordable rear wheel drivers these days and most of the surviving ones have the engine in front.
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Or in the middle.
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wrote:

SNIP
For a start not all cars (especially middle market cars in the 1960's) come with capable drivers.
More seriously you assume a smooth level surface on the road (even less common in the 1960's) - slide into a bump and the wheel will fold under the car.
The fault was relatively easily induced. You did NOT want to be in the car (or near it) when it was.
Some 1960's rear engine RWD cars had nightmare handling - my dad used to put a bag of sand in his Renault 8 back in the 60's to counter this. The Hillman Imp was another tricky one. Whilst Porsche have long since sorted the 911 line's "nervous" or "challenging" handling for normal driving, if they do let go then you are in big trouble.
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On Tue, 25 Jan 2011 20:33:57 -0000, "R. Mark Clayton"

I never had that happen with my Vitesse, and mine was one of the early ones that were much more prone to it than the better sorted later ones. When it did happen, the wheel did not "fold under the car." There simply wasn't that much travel in the rear suspension. It would ride up onto the edge of the tire, hiking the rear of the car up, and then settle back down.

Why not?

Actually, I always thought that the stock Imp handled pretty well. I think that people used to put bags of sand in the front because there was a perceived, but not real, benefit in reducing the positive camber in the front. Ill informed intuition is often seriously wrong.
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I don't see how 1.6L in audi is fundamentally different from that in a different car as plebeian as you imply mazda and chevrolet are (unless i read too much into your response) Automakers, with rare exceptions for honda s2000, aren't exactly eager to extract the most power out of the lowest displacement.
That might have something to do with the fact that 1. the target audience is not exactly looking for the cutting edge dynamics 2. you could just as well accomplish the same with the proper gearing and throwing the 6th cog into works.
But, needless to say, one got to ask the question: what is the threshold where there's just not enough power for a/c to be effective and the anecdotal evidence points somewhere in the 1.6 to 2.0 range.
I'm considering a 1.6 mill in A4 because the $4/gallon gas might be history in the heavily screwed up US metro areas such as silicon valley and NY but it's very real where i live. That coupled with the perception that 1.8T is not the best engine audi had to offer. The perception in my neck of woods is that 1.6 is bulletproof due to the simplicity inherent to its design. The locals could not say the same about the bmw 4 pots even though given that I want an xi trim I'd have to pony up for 2.5 I6 anyway which I was considering before i dug for the service part of the equation (see below).

[long rant about my views on service] I want an awd sedan for my current purposes (don't want an suv or a crossover). hence 5 is out of the picture for now: no awd and complex electrics -> I must have mentioned that bmw service around here is vastly inferior to that of vw in terms of avalilability and quality.
Me thinks i'd have to do with A4 or A6 quattro primarily because of the puny official bmw service in minsk. There are 6 or 7 official vw services in the city of 2 million and one official bmw service that reputedly rips people off (it's good to be the only game in town i suppose).
I definitely don't want to be stranded with no options for service if the relationship with the singular bmw service won;t work. And being the picky bastard that i'm the chances of that are high: the locals just don't seem to buy into the "customer is always right, even when he is wrong". I don't think most of the businesses around here can spell "l-o-n-g s-a-l-e". Hey! Make a buck! Quick!
thanks
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