Rear shock removal Audi 200

Does anyone have a good alternative to purchasing the $90 Hazet tool for removing the strut from the spring assembly. I don't do this for a living
otherwise I'd buy one. If anyone has BTDT without this tool could you tell me how you did it?
Thanks! Steve
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Steve, If the rear is anything like the setup on my 1987 5ktq, the rear shocks are not a cartridge like the front, but just require the removal of the spring perch from the old shock. I got a decent spring compressor on loan from my local Canadian Tire. Once the spring was compressed I could easily release the shock from the top mount using vice grips on the shaft (shocks went into the bin so I didn't car about scratching the chromed steel shaft). I used an air chisel and some liquid wrench to break the perch free from the old shocks. I believe that I wrapped the steel shaft in a few layers of duct tape when reinstalling into the top mount, thus the vice grips didn't leave a mark. On the front I used a big pipe wrench to remove and reinstall the retaining nut used to hold the insert in - many others have done the same. Cheers! Steve Sears 1987 Audi 5kTQ 1980 Audi 5k 1962 and '64 Auto Union DKW Junior deLuxes (SPAM Blocker NOTE: Remove SHOES to reply)

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Hi Steve, and thanks for your help. This is a 200 turbo FWD. I have the shocks/spring assembly out of the car with spring compressors. The shocks have a cylindrical rod with two flat opposite sides at the top, (like a racetrack shape) that needs to be held while a 17 mm nut is loosened. Problem is, your socket to loosen the nut obliterates the top of the shock, so you can't hold the racetrack shaped rod. There is a special socket tool that has a cut-out to access the top of the shock, but I was wondering if there is some work-around to this tool that I haven't thought of yet and someone else has. I'm at the point of using a hacksaw to cut the shock in half :) I've already pulled out my hair.
Thanks, Steve

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Steve, Instead of using a socket, couldn't you use a box-ended wrench? or a crow's foot wrench? Or maybe just abandon holding the chromed steel rod at the head altogether and wrap it in a few turns just below the top mount (where the shock will never travel anyway) and use some good vice grips on it? (Remove the tape after torquing the 17mm nylock nut on the top). Cheers! Steve Sears 1987 Audi 5kTQ 1980 Audi 5k 1962 and '64 Auto Union DKW Junior deLuxes (SPAM Blocker NOTE: Remove SHOES to reply)

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Hi Steve A box end wrench would not fit into the rubber mount. I ended up hack sawing the old shock right below the cylinder and using a vise on the opposite end of the cylinder. A mess, but it did the trick. I'd like to know why they use those tamper proof configurations in the first place. Audi special tool merchandising.
Thanks Again! Steve

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~ Elektraman ~ wrote:

OWWW! Too late for me to suggest using an impact wrench. The impact can often break this stuff loose (even if you can't hold the shock shaft well) when you can't really get anything else to work. FWIW I've often used a pipe wrench to hold the shock shaft.

Yup. -- C.R. Krieger (Been there; done that)
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