Stripped Torgue Bolt (female)

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Hello everyone, while attemtping to determine if I have a "cracked head" or "cracked block" the female torque bolt on the head has been stripped.
I am desperately seeking an alternative to cutting the head. Which will ofcourse ruin it (if it not already ruined)
Are there any alternatives?
Thanks
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it's ruined already.........just drill the head off.
clanger

or
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Here's me, trying to work out what a female bolt is! Is it a nut?
--
Peter Bell (Note Spamtrap - To reply, replace 'invalid' with 'bellfamily')

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Peter Bell writes:

Yeah, I too wondered about that. Female bolt....... I imagine he is talking about the hole a bolt would go into. Regardless, if it is stripped, perhaps re-tapping the hole will do the trick. I'd have it done professionally, however.
Dave RS6 d;o)
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Sorry yes it is a nut
wrote:

'bellfamily')
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wrote:

So what's the problem? The nut spinning on a stud?
If that's the case, you could try a nut-splitter.. it's named for what it does ;o)
--

Hairy One Kenobi

Disclaimer: the opinions expressed in this opinion do not necessarily
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or a shaped charge, 10oz should do
wrote:

opinion
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wrote:

it
H1K
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Well it is actually a bolt and a nut all in one. Again I am a novice and someone else was doing the work. I just was not comftorable with just splitting the head if it was salvagable. Considering the fact that we did not know if we actually had a cracked block or not and funds are tight.
Basically the top where the Torque Screw goes into the teeth are stripped. So it is not a snug fit
wrote:

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Are you perhaps referring to a TORX bolt, where the head of the bolt has a splined hole in the top to take a splined male driver bit? I don't think any of the correspondents have suggested splitting the head, just splitting the nut (if it is a nut).
If it's a bolt (that is a long thing with threads on the bottom end that passes through a clearance hole in the head and screws into the block, and a lump on the top that is either hexagonal for a conventional socket or splined as suggested for a torx driver) then you have to try and remove the whole bolt. You could try turning it with a hammer and chisel (but it will be tight and you may just destroy it a bit more). Or try welding something on the top of it that will allow you to get more leverage to unscrew it. Take care to disconnect electronic ignition, alternator etc before doing any arc welding.
--
<< To email me please swap over Denton and Lodge in my address >>

"Darnell Barber" < snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
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wrote:

nut?
what
<moved southwards>

did
OK, I'm guessing on the "divided by a common language" principal.
I'm guessing, here, but do you have a TORX bolt/set screw[1]?
If you have, then you have a TORX bolt/whatever *probably* going through a clearance hole[2] into *probably* either a cast iron or aluminium alloy block.
Either that or you have a big threaded spike appearing through said clearance hole with a "dead" nut on it. That's a stud[3]
As far as any damage goes - it's hard to say. A lot depends upon which one you have - I haven't done a whole lot of stuff on Audi/VW engines (mostly Ford, Rover, and a few bizarre things. I'm English; sorry; comes with the territory..)
If it's that TORX thingummy (like a hex-shaped dooberry, but with a star-shaped hole in the top), then it's dreadfully important to let us know if you might have tightened it by mistake (clockwise down, like a corkscrew). If it's the spike wotsit, then breathe easy - nuts are but a couple of cents, and can be split with a very inexpensive and readily-available tool.
Whichever way, *please* let us know before getting a pair of Mole grips to the bugger ("self-locking pliers"? Dunno, but they must be used in the US - other observers, please supply the correct phrase! Commonly used for rounding-off Mini brake adjusters..)
HTH
H1K
[1] Don't ask. Pointy thing disappearing into a hole in a bit expanse of expensive metal? (*Not* taking the wotsit - I'd give you the same look if you asked me about (e.g.) embroidery or the finer points of flower-arranging! Or whatever you know loads about that I don't..)
[2] I didn't make up the lingo! Not trying to confuse, but you may see the term from either a respondent or an engineer who looks at the problem. As well as (hopefully!) helping to sort out what's going on, I would hate for you to be bull***tted by a garage! "Clearance hole" means "big enough to fit through without snagging" Us engineers aren't graced with a lot of imagination. See next point for confirmation ;o)
[3] No, really. Use your imagination! ;o)
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wrote: [snipped]

Either "Vise Grips" or "Channel Locks" will round-off bolt heads and nuts with little provocation...
/daytripper '00 s4 6spd
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stripped.
Confusion reigns!
It sounds to me like a typical VW/Audi head bolt, a socket head bolt that takes a 12 spline bit.
If it is, the head of the bolt can be carefully drilled off so that what is left is effectively a stud. Just use a drill about the same diameter as the hole in the bolt head. The cylinder head can then be removed from the block and the offending "stud" removed with a stud extractor.
Hope this is not barking up the wrong tree.
Cheers Rach
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is
the
block
Arrrgggghhhh. (Cough, cough)
No, not a good idea.
If it's a bolt, then it's mobile. It also tightens-up in the /same/ direction that a drill goes.
If you're lucky (and this is usually worse), you'll end up with a bolt locked into the head, permanently deformed threads in an ally head, and a mangled bolt-head.
Usually, you'll also end-up with a broken drill bit and Man's best attempt at a hard substance jammed in the top of the bolt.
For best results, use an "easy-out" - they're harder to drill-out and (being more brittle) are even more prone to breakage. That 10oz of plastique might help, though ;o)
I still have two intact easy-outs out of my set of five - I've only used the set thrice :o\
OTOH, if you /do/ bugger a "blind hole" (generally block/head. No insult intended ;o), there's always the chance of recovering with a Helicoil/retap.
OP [Original Poster], please answer first..!
--

Hairy One Kenobi

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Ooh Hairy you are such a wus!! I am only suggesting this technique because from Darnell's description, it sounds very like a head bolt to me. I have done this before (on an abused 1978 100 GL5E), honest! If the offending bolt is indeed holding the cylinder head on still, it won't be mobile and it won't turn under the torque of a CAREFULLY applied drilling implement.
Darnell, can you tell us what car/engine you are talking about?

(being
might
the
I too have broken off easyouts and they are a nightmare. I use them as a last resort!
How do you get an easyout into the bolt in the first place?? You drill the bolt. However, if you use a slightly larger drill, same diameter as the bolt shank, and are CAREFUL you can use the socketed head of the bolt to guide the drill. Eventually, you will get down to where the bolt shank meets the bolt head and the bolt head will come off, probably stuck to the drill bit. It's just like drilling out a rivet.
From a rough calc, if drilling the bolt fails, 10oz of plastique will be just sufficient shift the head and give you a nice open air garage too.

Helicoil/retap.
I can recommend Aussie "Recoil" thread repair insert kits. They are really easy to use and are excellent.
Cheers! R
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Sorry everyone, learning the proper names for the various bolts. This is a Torx bolt (female) for an Audi 80 91' 5 cylinder engine if this helps at all.
Someone mentioned a strong epoxy and letting it sit for a day.
Does this sound like something that could possibly work?
It just appears to be a bit easier than drilling etc...
AND MANY THANKS TO EVERYONE FOR THEIR INPUT.
Darnell

a
attempt
bolt
bolt
bit.
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I doubt if the epoxy will work. Torque is too high.
If you are SURE that it is stripped and that you just have the wrong tool (English rather than metric, Allen rather than torx ...) you could try this. Use another tool, one sized a bit bigger (try an English size) and if it is slightly bigger, hammer it in very well and then try to use an impact wrench to remove the bolt. Doing this will probably ruin the tool because while it is hardened, it is still probably softer than the head bolt. So you replace a cheap tool.
GOOD LUCK
Tony '91 100 Q 5spd
Darnell Barber wrote:

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a
attempt
bolt
There are other things to try first, in my view.. it'll work with an iron engine (which I believe the 100 was?), but can do "interesting" things to a alloy block. Been there, seen it, had to fix it for someone.. nasty job, using shims.

bolt
bit.
A hardened high-carbon steel rivet, maybe ;o)
Personally, I'd try a few other things first - Mole grips being one ("Vice grips" in the US - thanks day'). Most TORX that I've seen have a finished head to make then easier to handle with oily hands, and can support /some/ torque.
The trick here is to make sure that your knuckles don't get too near to something major when (not if!) they slip. (OT: many jobs on Minis were described by the number of knuckles you'd damage in the process - "change the clutch? <sucks teeth> That's a three-knuckle job, that is, mate")
The other time-honoured technique - if there's room - is to insert two blades into a hacksaw (each pointing in opposite directions), and cut a small groove in the head. This allows you to get a flat-blade screwdriver in there. Eventually. Lot's of scope for slipping, banging head against block, and stabbing oneself in the leg with a screwdriver - be careful!
/Absolute/ last result is to try and cut flats to take a conventional spanner. The bolt will ruin a bastard file (and anything finer will simply slide over the surface), and grinders aren't the easiest thing to control in an underbonnet environment. Best to have the engine on the bench for that one..!
Haven't worked on the engine quoted - if it's an alloy block, then the bolt may be corroded-in. A sharp (but gentle) tap with a hammer along the centre axis of the bolt may help to break any corrosion-locking.
Graphite-based penetrating oil can also help, but it's a bugger to get out again - remember, if you lubricate a torqued joint, then you'll get a massively increased torque. And snapped bolts are an even bigger bitch to get out..
Plusgas (effectively Zippo fuel) and WD-40 might also work (and are easier to remove - they evapourate), but don't be surprised if you use a whole can (and are completely stoned!) without affecting the bolt all that much.

;o)
Excellent for ally parts; I tend to re-tap holes in cast iron (I trust it a bit more when taking a torque..)
HTH
H1K
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Hairy One Kenobi wrote:

A drimmel rotary tool would make quick work of putting flats on the head and should be rather easy to control.
Stu
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There is actually a special-made drill bit for exactly such an operation. I have used it for exhaust manifold studs gone wrong.
It is a reverse-twist bit. You use a dental burr chucked into a Dremel to indent the top of the stud. Then apply the drill bit with the drill set to "reverse." Now, this is after a couple of days soaking with a penetrating oil. I have always been able to get the job done this way. It may not work in this case, but it's worth a shot. -- Jonesy
E-mail me: rfjonesy *at* hotmail *dot* com
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