1988 735i loose strut..how is it tightened?

Hello:) I had this problem about 2 years ago on the passenger side and took it in to the mechanic. I remember him taking a large pair of channel lock pliers to hold something under the fender while he
tightened the top strut nut. My mechanic is now gone and I peaked under the fender and dont see where could of put it to stop the strut from spinning while tightening? I dont want to put it on the chrome rod unless that how its done? I put the car in the air and grabbed the tire at 9 and 3 'clock and can see the whole assembly move. Strut mounts were new about 2 years ago. I was hearing a noise over bumps on the left side that why I went searching for the problem. Thank :)Nate
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Generally (I don't know your exact model) it could be loose in two places - the insert into the strut (if it has an insert), and this has a nut on top of the insert housing. If it is the top bearing, there's usually some means - hex or socket - on the rod to hold it while you tighten the nut. Of course it could be a failed top bearing or the housing for that could be loose.
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On Aug 22, 6:57 pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (:\) :\)) wrote:

Isn't that normal? Can you be more specific about where it's moving?
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I checked my E39 - that has a hex (allen socket) in the top of the rod which you use to stop it turning. To torque correctly you'll need one which fits a torque wrench and a suitable spanner for the nut. Although I'd guess there is a special tool. I'm pretty certain my long gone E28 had the same arrangement - it's the only one I've changed the struts on.
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Hello, I figured it out. I jacked up the car and held the top strut nut (17mm) while a friend turned the large nut with a pair of large channel locks. This large nut was under the fender well up high by the strut mount bearings... Thanks so much for the help!! :)Nate
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Actually, you would not want to torque the strut rod. You would want to torque the nut and hold the strut.
Only problem being that a socket can't be used on the nut because the hex recess in the strut rod comes up through it's middle.
There are short box end and open end extensions for torque wrenches that allow this kind of operation. The extension has a multiplication factor to be applied to the reading on the torque wrench to get the actual applied torque. Or you could calculate the value yourself if you're sharp.
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Indeed- you're likely to get an error through the friction of the rod turning in the shock and the bearing.

That's the problem.

I can usually get quite close to the correct setting by 'feeling' it. I doubt it's a super critical setting. Haven't had any problem with changing inserts on any car I've owned so I must be doing it about right.
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wrote:

Not really. Try a ring spanner. Measure the length and calculate the reduction you need to set the torque wrench to. If you have a lever 1 ft long and exert 10lb pressure on it you have 10lb/ft so if it 2 ft long you have 20lb/ft etc.

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snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com wrote:

Did you bother to read the following paragraph? I already said the same thing...

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No Fred I didn't read your following paragraph but you didn't actually say the same you merely said that certain devices were available with formulas or figures that facilitates the use of them. I was simply making a suggestion that if he had a ring spanner he could jury-rig an alternative to forking out cash for something he would probably never use again.
Sorry if I upset you.
Steve

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snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.com wrote:

You didn't upset me.
How would you use a "ring spanner" with a torque wrench? Can I assume that "ring spanner" is another name for a box end wrench?
The opposite end of the box wrench is not likely to fit the 1/2" square drive of a torque wrench.
An example for the truly frugal: Once when I had to torque one of the large nuts on a BMW steering rack I opted to make an adapter from a piece of 1/4" plate steel. I cut the required large hex opening in one end and a 1/2" square in the other end a precise distance apart (center to center). Same principle there...
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No Fred a ring spanner as known here in the UK is a flat bar as in an open-ended wrench but instead of a fork at each end the thing has a 16 point (double hex) ring that fits the nut. most common would be 1/2"-9/16" or over here 12mm -13mm
In the past as a jury-rig I have used a "ring" spanner with a large hex bolt in the other. " x nuts on the bolt locked and the torque wrench socket on that. calculate the torque with the extension and set the torque wrench to it and off you go.
I'm not saying it's perfect for main bearing caps or head bolts on a race engine but it does work.
Steve
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Me too. But for the truly anal retentive do-it-yourselfers out there, tools are available to "do it right". ;-)
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