1991 BMW 740IL full brake replacement

Hello,
I've got a request to change brakes in a friends car. 1999 BMW 740 IL (4 wheel disc). Here is what i know so far from research and reading up
on other posts:
1. No special tools are needed for the replacement and its similar to any other import car 2. The car has about 90,000 miles on it, so i am going to replace the rotors, and i belive i have to change the wear sensor that works with the rotor. 3. the OEM brake rotors are made up of softer metal, hence i will be going for another brand name, probably Bendix or so.
I'm not new to working on cars, just finished replacing an engine in a Mazda, but i have never worked on a European car. Please, i would really appreciate anyone on their opinions/thoughts on this project.
Thanks in advance,
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my apologies, its a 1999
Thanks
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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Bendix? Hoookay. I've tried a bunch and really like the slotted ATE "power disc" (yeah, silly name) ones. They're maybe a buck or two more but do seem to work and last better.
Check the date codes on the soft lines. If they at or near 5 years old just change all four on priciple. Makes a big difference. Usually the sensors come with the pads but it's good to verify this.
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Assuming you have the correct metric hex keys for the guides and disc fixing screws.

Two needed - back and front.

Up to you but the OEM setup works well. I reckon it's more the pads which are hard than the discs soft, as it were.

Pretty straightforward - but I'd think you'll easily find instructions on how to if you Google.
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OEM PARTS ONLY, or you may regret it.
Bendix?? wtf?
ATE are also good, but OEM discs are excellent.

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SharkmanBMW! wrote:

I recently did all the brakes, including parking brake on an E38. It's very easy indeed. The bendix discs I ordered first were junk so had to get some different ones. I got QH rear discs and they look just fine. I've put pagid fast road pads on the front. When I did the rear brakes I noticed the parking brake shoes were screwed so place those on the order too. You only need new pad sensors if the old ones have worn through (i.e. the dash light is on) All in cost me about 100 or around US$200.
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Thanks everyone for the tips. One more question:
When you remove the caliper, does the rotor simply slide off, or do i have to remove the axle nut from the wheel assembly?
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

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Thanks everyone for the tips. One more question:
When you remove the caliper, does the rotor simply slide off, or do i have to remove the axle nut from the hub assembly?
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

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D wrote:

"Simply slide off" isn't necessarily the words I'd use but yes. Google for e38 brake job and you should find some pretty good guides and/or go to www.e38.org
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After removing the caliper which you do for pad changing you also have to remove the caliper carrier before the disk will come off. On some models the fixing bolts for these can be awkward to access with the car jacked up. The disc is just held on the hub by a hex head machine screw, but these often seize so make sure you have the correct metric hex key - and be prepared to drill it out. The discs themselves don't normally seize on the hubs.
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perfectly put! spray those hex heads with some wd-40 or whatever as soon as you get the wheel off and give it some time to work... they are the biggest PITA of the job.
London SW

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SharkmanBMW! wrote:

One word - impact driver Ok two words - impact drivers are excellent Ok four words....
I had no trouble with my brakes even though every other nut and bolt underneath was rusted solid.
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