ABS light is on

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Coffee kills them, damp randomly seems to trash them, and snapping the dial off the front of the fluke 100s seems easy (I don't know how, I only see the remains). Equally there's perfect working mk11 70 series here & my old 867s nearly black from ingrained oil & still passes calibration.
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Duncan Wood wrote:

AVO model 8. can't beat it. ;-)
Well, not for working on older electronics, anyway, as it was the reference meter for most circuit diagram voltages until the 70s at least.
For a car, the cheapest you can get, 'cos IME, they last about three jobs before they get soaked, dropped, trodden on, borrowed, lost.....
--
Tciao for Now!

John.

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On Sat, 08 Jan 2011 10:52:27 -0600, dizzy wrote:

Look at the post I was replying to; we were discussing the relative merits of cheap vs expensive DMM's surviving *physical* events.
BTW, it's generally selecting a current range and connecting across a supply that kills them electrically; even Fluke die when you do that enough times.

You must have a whole different class of average jerks where you come from! Some of the guys I worked with would kill at least one a year...
Chris
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Chris Whelan wrote:

Well, I was thinking home/occasional usage. Daily usage in an automotive shop would be far more abusive, of course.
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On 6 Jan 2011 09:43:03 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

Most meters, especially the really cheap ones will survive dropping from a few feet, not because of the quality of their construction but mainly because they have bugger all mass to start with. I have a pair of Fluke Cat III 1000v test probes that weigh more than the dirt cheap no brand Chinese digital multimeters I carry round in the toolbox of all my cars, and while I have a five and a half digit bench meter and numerous other portable meters that cost many hundreds of pounds each there is no real need for any of them in automotive work. Precision as such matters not a jot, if it's accurate to 5% then that'll do. It doesn't need anything better. Plus if you are in the habit of running over your test equipment then maybe they deserve a more caring owner,
For instance, something like this. http://cpc.farnell.com/jsp/level5/module.jsp?moduleId=cpc/525936.xml
GBP 3.06 including VAT
That leaves about 300 quid to spend on beer, or a holiday in the sun or snow compared to buying something like a Fluke 77.
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Well, perhaps I should have been clearer as you say. But my assumption was that this was also a group for non-DIYers to seek advice. And I think I *was* fairly clear in my opening post that my options were local garage or BMW dealer, not DIY.

I have 5 DMMs, an analog 'scope and a PC-based digital 'scope.

Even in dry conditions on a flat surface, with all the questions that I posed answered in advance, I think that's highly optimistic considering my skill level!

Yes, but the car passed its MOT a month or so ago, when all those were done. You still seem to think I have skills that to you are obviously basic but alien to me!
And after the checks, I'd still have need to take it to the garage, as you see from my latest post!

Thanks, that's a good reference. If I ever came to do it though, I'd still be a bit confused by Method 1: "Jack up the car and take off the road wheel. The ABS road speed sensor cable should be visible within the wheel arch. Locate the connector (usually 2-pin) and disconnect it. Behind the wheel hub should be the road speed sensor, which is bolted on and near the crown wheel.
With your DMM set to ohms, connect the probes to the connector, road speed sensor side (so it measures the sensor and not the ABS system)."
That's a bit ambiguous IMO. *Which* connector is not immediately obvious, the ABS or the RSS? Closer examination makes it clear that it must be the ABS, but that's the sort of thing I mean about difficulties for non mechanics like me that you experts take in your stride.

Badly - you obviously didn't see my later post!
--
Terry, East Grinstead, UK

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On Thu, 06 Jan 2011 12:34:48 +0000, Terry Pinnell wrote:

Are you able to jack up your car to change a wheel? If so, and you understand how to use all your test equipment, it really would be child's play.

Ah, OK. Some folk are best advised not to even try!

You have *much* more faith than me in the motor trade; bear in mind also that an MOT is the absolute minimum standard, and only applies at the time of test.

[...]
If you have no success with the link that has been posted for a repair, try here:
http://www.bba-reman.com/uk/index.aspx
Chris
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Thanks, that's a coincidence! I just called my local garage again after phoning that outfit in Nottingham that Tony suggested, and the garage mentioned 'BBA'. I googled them and phoned their Rochester office a few minutes ago.
They too needed a part number but gave me a quote range from 120 to 200 including VAT. And, contrary to my garage, reassured me that it would *not* need re-programming, as its memory would be preserved (providing the car batter was first removed - a common fatal mistake apparently).The garage reckon another 100 or so to remove and refit it. So I'm looking at 400, possibly less (*if* they can do it at all - otherwise 35 for the trouble.)
One other significant factor I now need to consider is that, capitalising on the fact the garage had the car, I asked them to look at my heating.
Hmm, before I go on, maybe I'd better start a new thread, as this is now way OT.
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Terry, East Grinstead, UK

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On Thu, 06 Jan 2011 12:34:48 +0000, Terry Pinnell wrote:
[...]

Where about in the country are you?
Chris
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See my sig!
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Terry, East Grinstead, UK

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On Thu, 06 Jan 2011 13:25:55 +0000, Terry Pinnell wrote:

Doh!
Wrong part of the country for the reliable independent BMW specialist I recommend.
Chris
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wrote:

Funny you should say that, I never assumed he wanted to give this a go. I only assumed he didn't know what was going on, and wanted to use us for a better understanding of the system and the ramifications of the light being on.
My concern now is that the service center he selected has diagnosed the contoller, but says the car has to go to the dealer to be programmed after repairs are complete. How can he diagnose the controller with equipment that cannot program the car?
He also was told that the heater blows cold because head gasket is bad, and the head gasket is bad because the pressure test shows high pressure.
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On Thu, 06 Jan 2011 09:13:40 -0800, Jeff Strickland wrote:
[...]

Easily.
A generic (E)OBD scanner will only allow fault codes to be interrogated, and some limited resets to be done.
More sophisticated (and hence expensive) kit is needed for anything else, and as this is not covered by the standard, will be manufacturer-specific.
Chris
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wrote:

Ignoring the crap in your garage that has to be moved, or the slope of the driveway that drops into an abyss, replacing speed sensors is a relatively easy job.
Remove the tire and locate the wire that goes into the center portion of the hub -- not exact center, and located to the top as opposed to the bottom. This wire leads to the sensor. The other end of the wire is the difficult part. It goes into a plastic protective sheath that you have to open without breaking. Good light helps make this job easier.
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On Thu, 06 Jan 2011 09:54:57 -0000, Terry Pinnell

There's normally only two sets of cables, one sets the pad wear indicator (which is normally 1 wire), the other's the ABS sensor. Picture here http://www.dvatp.com/bmw/diy/brakes /

Road speed sensors tend (but not always) to be on the transmission, so they can have a real magnet & generate some real voltage.

Turning it quickly with the meter on AC works best
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wrote:

And there are only two wires on diagonal corners of the car, left front and right rear. One is the speed sensor, the other is the brake wear indicator. The brake wear indicator wire goes into the brake caliper. The wire to look for is the one that goes into the hub, not the brake caliper.
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Thanks to all for the follow-ups.
But having just seen this estimated valuation of my car
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/4019461/BMW-Valuation.jpg
I'm rapidly coming to the view that a replacement is due sooner rather than later. Spending even a few hundred seems increasingly indefensible, much as I love the car.
A relative in the trade raised eyebrows when I told him of my intention to continue driving with the ABS (probably) inoperative. He's in his 30s. Overcautious or sensible advice? I'm in my 60s and my first reaction was that, while ABS is obviously desirable (it's saved my bacon a couple of times over the last decade or two), its absence surely can't be regarded as *dangerous*.
--
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like they were saying:

Umm, your comment on the valuation - "Guess it would count as below average _despite it's recent MOT_"...?
Are you implying that being in MOT-passing condition is anything more than a bare minimum suggestion of roadworthiness?
When it comes down to it, you've got a thirsty 15yo example of BMW's absolute low-point of recent years, the E36. If it was a coupe, it might be desirable to some up-and-coming low-rent pimp, but not a saloon. If it was a manual, it might be a vaguely entertaining basis for a track-day toy, but not an auto. It's too complicated and thirsty for bangernomics, and utterly devoid of any retro-cool.
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Sorry to be picky, but if you're going to quote me... ;-) "...despite its recent MOT..." ^^^
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Terry, East Grinstead, UK

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like they were saying:

<grin>
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