Auto Wipers

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On Fri, 11 Jun 2010 18:19:59 +0100, "David Skelton"


Are you saying that wear patterns developed in a highly stressed engine in a short time frame cannot be remotely similar to those produced by a lower stressed engine in a much longer time frame?
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On Mon, 14 Jun 2010 16:57:15 +0100, "David Skelton"

Wear rates may be different but you're not convincing me that the wear pattern itself must be different.

Hmmm..remember Nikasil?
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BMW wouldn't have used Nikasil if they'd known it would cause problems with some petrol. And they weren't unique in being caught out by this.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Wed, 16 Jun 2010 12:03:04 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

..and there lies the problem. Someone at BMW guessed wrongly. You do kinda hope that your pride and joy was tested and not just designed on hope and a prayer. Joking aside, it's fairly fundamental that an internal combustion engine can burn the fuel available in its market area without self destructing in the process.
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(tongue in cheek)

If you remember to operate this switch you could remember to put the oil in before starting?

Compression checks are old hat. A leakdown test is the way these days. But I wouldn't expect to be doing one until the engine has reached a huge mileage. However, to do a compression check you have to remove the coils - and I'd be rather surprised if the ECU opened the injectors under those conditions.

A decent system will retain pressure for ages after the pump stops so you'd be wise to take the normal precautions.

Anyone clever enough to bypass the BMW immobiliser would soon find a switch?
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Most higher end cars are stolen these days *with* the ignition key gained from residential robberies, or, as I have seen, a *fake* accident where the desired car is bumped at a junction, the driver gets out and is overpowered and the car is then taken.
The fuel pump kill device does not have to be a switch. I have used a phono jack plug and socket as a link in the circuit before. The more 'ways' on the jack, the better. Some have four connections, only two need to be linked. That is six combinations of possible circuits it could be to make the fuel pump circuit complete.
best wishes
David Skelton
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You must not have done it correctly. If you hold the stop/start switch for 2 seconds, the engine will shut down, no matter whether you are moving or whether you are still in gear.
I just tried this on my 335d.
FloydR
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On Thu, 10 Jun 2010 15:33:57 -0700, "Floyd Rogers"

Fantastic..a car just like my PC..ok, it needs 4 seconds!
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Why?
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That was true at one time. Engine builders are able to (and go to great effort/expense to) flush that crap out of the motor because the car maker does not want to be exposed to the warranty issues that arise from it remaining.
I don't know how much oil a deisel holds -- the gas engines hold 7 quarts -- but I think you are throwing away perfectly good oil and getting no tangable benefit from the exercise or expense.
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On Fri, 11 Jun 2010 17:58:20 +0100, "David Skelton"

Yes but it's still tiny.

Not these days.. Part of the reason long life oils do what they say on the tin is because engines are much better built and designed to vastly better tolerances than 20 years ago.

But that's an immediate problem because *so* much has changed in the last 20 years. For a start, common-rail diesel became the standard and this was a huge step forward in terms of improving the quality and control of the burn in diesel engines.

Indeed.
My experience of diesel oil changes over the last 10 years is that the oil is always black within a few miles of a fresh change. It's designed to carry black soot.
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On Sun, 13 Jun 2010 22:05:41 +0100, Zathras

It depends on where you live. Mobil 1 and other good synthetics are eye-wateringly expensive in the YooKay. Not so in the YooEss. If I shop around I can get Mobil 1 for between $6 and $7 per quart/litre, delivered to my front door.
I can also get a quart/litre of good quality dino juice for $2 or $3.
I think that "market price" may have more to do with the price of engine oil in the YooKay than you realise.
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Indeed. I recently bought a heater fan final stage resistor off EBay - it's an aftermarket design presumably made in China or the far east. UK BIN price of 39.99 gbp. US BIN price 34 US dollars.
Last time I had a dealer service, they charged 13 gbp a litre for 'BMW' oil.
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On Mon, 14 Jun 2010 10:04:57 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

That's good to know. The OEM part is $106 from the dealer here. Mine is starting to sometimes behave erratically.
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It seems to work just fine and has a year's warranty. Can't possibly be shorter lived than the Valeo unit BMW supply. ;-)
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On Sun, 13 Jun 2010 18:27:50 -0400, Dean Dark

I made my point poorly. I meant that the long-life special oils are stupidly expensive compared to the lesser oils of previous generations that would have worked fine in a car of the type I now have. I would be surprised if a BMW Longlife 04 oil was not among the more expensive oils to be found in any market place.
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