BMW Accelerator jam car hits 135mph

Page 2 of 8  


Good Lord there is some crap on Usenet. There is a torque converter between the engine and 'box on conventional automatics which may have a lock-up clutch to give a direct drive without slip above a certain speed which may vary. However there are a number of multi-plate clutch packs inside these gearboxes which are engaged and disengaged hydraulically and, these days, controlled electronically. None of these clutches are directly controlled by the driver.
Now it seems to me that the only plausible cause of this 'accident' is if the cruise control malfunctioned. He could still have knocked the auto into neutral or switched the engine off though.
Huw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 11 Mar 2006 23:12:13 -0000, "Huw"

Well, let's get this back on course. Has the car definitely got a neutral. I think I know the answer to that one, but let's hear it from someone who does know about cars and this one in particular.

The report said the gears had jammed so one would assume that amongst the other disasters to have struck this rolling pile of crap, neutral wasn't an option... As for switching the engine off, presumably his hands were already full what with phoning the AA, the Police, Mum and the RSPCA.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

I'm thinking that the electronics wouldn't let him deselect 5th if going into 4th would put the engine past redline. I didn't think beemer box's did that though.
--
Alan LeHun

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's a 4 speed old-tech slushomatic box.
Whatever really happened, we'll never know, but the story being spouted by said chav is obviously bullshit.
--
Steve H 'You're not a real petrolhead unless you've owned an Alfa Romeo'
http://www.italiancar.co.uk - Honda VFR800 - MZ ETZ300 - Alfa 75 TSpark
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

BMW calls their system Steptronic. But this car was too old to have it.
--
*It sounds like English, but I can't understand a word you're saying.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Nevertheless it can be smoothly and easily slipped into neutral.
Huw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As can any auto.
--
*Those who live by the sword get shot by those who don't*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Steptronic is basically a means of overriding the engine's choice of gear... It's basically a means of giving you manual control of an auto car...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not quite. If you try and exceed the preset maximum or minimum speeds of the engine in that gear it will change anyway. It gives you a degree of manual control which simply isn't needed with a modern auto. It's a five minute wonder to those who specify it.
--
*If at first you don't succeed, redefine success.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yes indeed. I hardly ever use it and then only to maintain a low gear for descending very steep slopes in the Range Rover where I am loath to use the standard Hill Descent Control system for fear of braking traction. Hardly significant or relevant to road car use.
Huw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 12 Mar 2006 12:00:50 -0000, "Huw"

When the M1 was first opened, we were solemnly warned not to take our foot off the accelerator quickly as the car would become uncontrollable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Blimey! You are an old cretin ;-) Whoever told or informed you of that is also brainless.
JS
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Well that was in an era of old three speed Ford Zephyr 6 cars which would be floored on a speed limitless new M1 when the car was built for pootling around at low speeds in a low top gear. The engine braking was such that the brakes were seldom needed to slow down other than to a stop and the suspension was almost uncontrolled by today's standards. So I would not be surprised if some cars actually became unstable on their crossplies and blamaunge suspension at that time purely from decelerating. Cars changed for the better later in the 60's but we are now 40 years on and no car I can think of would become unstable in anything like that situation. In case you think I am another old git for me to remember this, I am not 50 but do remember my grandfathers Zephyr vividly and climbing roads in top gear which have modern cars needing second gear out of five.
Huw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A three speed Zephyr 6 wouldn't do 100 mph anyway. About 85 was the tested maximum.

They actually handled quite well with decent tyres - certainly as well as other UK offerings from the major makers on a car this size. Remember it was one of the first cars to be fitted with the now common strut front suspension. The small Jaguars were better - but not by much.

Not so if in good condition. Their brakes may have been a problem, but some had all round discs in the late '50s. And the Ford in question had them as an option on the front in the early '60s.

Magazines like Autocar existed well before this and - as today - tested cars at their top speed. And would have been very critical of any which was unstable at this.

It's still a very practical car for today's use if in good condition. I remember it fondly. It just pulled hard from any speed in any gear.
The likely problem with trying to cruise at high speeds on the then new motorways was the engine blowing up. The gearing on most mainstream cars sold in the UK was low enough to allow the engine to exceed its safe limit if attempted for long periods.
--
*Do paediatricians play miniature golf on Wednesdays?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yes but it really felt like 200 compared with today.

They were all wallowy and lurchy as heck and had very little traction on those tyres. Good for their time but I am judging by today's standards.

Their original dire shock absorbers were non existant within two years of use or less as I remember it and were seldom changed in those days prior to the MOT.

They were judging on the standards of the time though. Today they would give any motorist used to a modern car the heeby-jeebies.

And drank like an alky.

No doubt.
Huw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Less of the "old" - I was a small kid in my parents' car. I don't think they believed it either.

Well, that's OK then.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Scenario: The man is driving for 60 miles with his car in this condition and has had time to experiment. He has found he can bring the speed down to 70 mph using the brakes, but not for long. It has dawned on him that if he cuts the engine he will stop, but has somehow got hold of the idea that this will lock the steering. Also he believe that cutting the ignition over 100mph causes terrible things to happen.
Ummm.. in that situation, wouldn't you just wait for a relatively straight bit of road; aim for the hard shoulder; jam on the anchors until you are below 100mph then cut the ignition anyway and come to a relatively safe halt? Surely that makes more sense than continuing at full speed until you crash?
Is there such a thing as criminal stupidity? If not, why not?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think he *could* bring the speed down to 70 at one point but he did this until he cooked his brakes.

What I'd like to know is the advice that the police gave him whilst he was on the phone to them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not a lot it seems! Probably a civilian who takes calls for the police from the public.
JS
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

At seventy you can downshift the bmw into a lower gear infact you can downshift into 2nd at seventy in a bmw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.